Author Topic: My first pics + new combination  (Read 1872 times)

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Offline tonymark

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My first pics + new combination
« on: March 09, 2006, 09:20:57 AM »
I recently read a post on here somewhere about goat cheese and pesto.  ( I'm sure some NY purists believe goat cheese only belongs on California style).

My combo:  Goat cheese (cherve), roasted red peppers, and Italian parsley pesto (recipe below).  Of course there was sauce and mozz.

WOW!  I never thought goat cheese would taste so good on pizza.  My wife loved the pizza, but I thought it seemed a bit rich after 3 or 4 slices.

Parsley pesto: 
1/2 c      Packed Italian Parsley (home grown)
1/4 c      EV olive oil
1/4 c      parmesan
1/2-1 T  10 year old balsamic vinegar

Process in mini food processor.  ( I meant to add garlic, but forgot )

Making Pizza is not cooking, it is Performance Art!


Offline Buffalo

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2006, 09:27:37 AM »
Good Morning tonymark;
Your pizzas look absolutely professional........would fit in ANY gourmet shop and give major competion to the other pizzas......Your crust is an eye catcher.....Would you share your formula ???  Thanks......
Buffalo

Offline tonymark

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2006, 10:04:28 AM »
Thanks ...

For this batch I used the following for 3 pies.  (25 min autolyse with 4 day retardation).

Flour      100.00%  King Arthur Bread
Water      64.00%
IDY          0.90%
Salt          1.50%

The IDY is probably a little high for a 4 day retardation.  The dough looked like it fell at the end of rising(not good),  but the oven spring was great as you can see from the photo.  I may have just thought the dough fell, but I will put less IDY in for a 4 day retardation next time.  I meant to cook this dough at 3 days, but didn't have time.

I like to use varasano's spreedsheet http://www.think2020.com/jv/Dough/PizzaRecipe.xls.

Look at my post for my mixing procedure http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2707.msg23707.html#msg23707


TM
Making Pizza is not cooking, it is Performance Art!

Offline briterian

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2006, 10:12:56 AM »
Great pie. You may have seen my post about the Green Lantern in Cinci (Dewey's Pizza)

The pizza I made - which I will post here soon - is called the "Green Lantern' and is famous at a pizza place here in Cincinnati called Deweys.
1. Tomato sauce base
2. Roasted Garlic
3. Mozz Cheese
4. Artichoke Hearts
5. Mushrooms
6. Pesto drizzled
7. Goat Cheese

This is by far the best gourmet pizza I've ever had.   

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2006, 11:05:11 AM »
TM,

Nice job.

Can you tell me how much each dough ball weighed and the sizes of the three pizzas?

Thanks.

Peter

Offline tonymark

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2006, 11:42:32 AM »
Each dough ball had a mass of 324 grams.  I try for a 13 - 14" pizza.  The pesto one was distorted upon release from the peel.  The dough was a little more difficult work with than my 3 day retarded dough.  Why is that?

TM
Making Pizza is not cooking, it is Performance Art!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2006, 12:49:18 PM »
TM,

From your numbers, it appears that your NY style is more in line with the "elite" NY style, like Patsy's and Raquel.

Four days is a fairly long time for cold fermentation. The "shelf life" of a dough is programmed into the dough from the start and is governed by several factors: type of flour, hydration, amount of yeast, and finished dough temperature (off the hook and in the refrigerator). All else being equal, a high protein dough will usually tolerate a longer fermentation than a lower protein flour. The difference may not be great between say, a high-gluten flour and a bread flour, but it is there nonetheless. A high hydration dough will also undergo greater biochemical activity than a lower hydration dough (it permeates everything more completely) and generally leads to a faster fermentation.  As the amount of yeast increases, the fermentation also takes place faster and if there is not enough sugar left when the time comes to bake the pizza, the dough will start to head south. That is one of the reasons that some people put a bit of sugar in the dough--to be sure that the yeast is always fed, especially after several days. A high finished dough temperature will also cause the fermentation to take place faster. In a collective sense, the greater the fermentation and the faster its rate, the shorter the shelf life of the dough.

In your case, there was enough sugar left in the dough at the time of baking to produce a good oven spring and to promote good crust coloration. If you used warm water, along with the amount of yeast you used and the 64% hydration, those factors could easily have kept the dough from lasting 4 days and handling well. I'm hesitant to tell you to change those factors if you really liked your results, but they are points that you might want to think about. I know from your past posts that you observe these kinds of considerations and are willing to experiment with them. That's a good way to learn and will virtually guarantee you good results.

Peter

Offline foodblogger

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2006, 01:19:59 PM »
Those pies look amazing!  I'm glad to see another believer in KA bread flour.  I've found that it makes amazing pizzas if you process it right.

Offline tonymark

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2006, 01:46:18 PM »
TM,

 A high finished dough temperature will also cause the fermentation to take place faster. In a collective sense, the greater the fermentation and the faster its rate, the shorter the shelf life of the dough.


I use water right from an under counter filter.  Currently the water temp is about 64 F.  I am sure the dough finishes higher with all the mixing I do.  I guess I am going to have to use cool water once the summer heat turns up in Atlanta. 

I have noticed that I get a good bit of rise in the first 12 hours.  After 2 hours out of the frigde, I can't notice any additional rise even at warm temps.  If I use cooler water, how will that effect the initial rise and overall rise after three days?

TM
Making Pizza is not cooking, it is Performance Art!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My first pics + new combination
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2006, 02:40:40 PM »
TM,

I took a look at your processing steps as outlined in the link you referenced in your opening post and unless you were using high mixer speeds I can't see how you would generate enough frictional heat to overcome a rather low water temperature of 64 degrees F, even after a total mix/knead time of around 13 minutes. You did use an autolyse and a shorter rest period, and that might have allowed the dough to warm up a bit if your room temperature was above 65 degrees, but even then the temperature rise would be slight. Next time, you may want to actually check the finished dough temperature.

Generally speaking, the cooler water will slow down the rate of fermentation and, in theory, should help increase the shelf life of the dough. But, the effects of using the cooler water can be negated, and then some, by using too much yeast. Under the circumstances, it would not be unusual to see the dough rise very quickly, even in the refrigerator. The best way to slow down the rate of fermentation is to use both cool/cold water and small amounts of yeast. In fact, I tested that combination with a Lehmann NY style dough and reported on the results at Reply 280, at page 15, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.280.html. If you read that post, I think you will see how the two factors—cool water and small amounts of yeast—work hand in hand to keep dough temperature and fermentation under control. The dough expansion will be restrained but it won't affect the final results.

Peter


 

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