Author Topic: Crunchy dough  (Read 680 times)

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Offline bhopper

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Crunchy dough
« on: November 05, 2013, 01:05:27 PM »
This morning I tried out a new recipe. The one I usually use takes to many ingredients, would like to keep food cost down. I did cheat, I used a bread machine to knead the dough. However the dough didnt turn out quite like I wanted it too. The crust was thin and crisp, which from my understanding is what you want, but for me I thought it was a little too crisp and it wasnt as quite as "airy" as Id like it to be. Would this be from over kneading the dough via bread machine? As far as light and fluffy, would this be from how the bread machine makes the dough rise.? I did like the characteristics that dough had when stretching it. My usual recipe calls for milk, eggs, shortening, sugar, salt, flour and yeast and I double rise the dough. This makes a very light, crisp, "airy dough". The one I used this morning was a basic recipe, flour, water, salt, yeast. Which is what I want to use and from my understanding is traditional. 1.5 pounds of dough is a lot for me to use and waste due too a limited budget. So I'll have to wait awhile before I can test it without the machine.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2013, 01:07:18 PM by bhopper »


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Crunchy dough
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2013, 01:10:24 PM »
What was your formula/recipe?
How did you manage/handle the dough after mixing.
How did you open the dough into a pizza skin?
What can you tell us about how you baked the pizza?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline bhopper

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Re: Crunchy dough
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2013, 01:42:29 PM »
Well I dont have a scale, but here it is.

3 c flour, all purpose. (Didnt wanna waste bread flour)
1/2 tsp salt, iodized
1 1/2 tsp ady
1 cup water
2 tblspn olive oil

After kneading the dough it was left to rise for an hour. The bread machine heats up to help with the rise, which I suspect is part of the problem.

After it was risen I formed into approximately .5 lb balls.

Not really sure what you mean by "opening the dough" but I put it on a floured board and stretched it by hand to about 3cm in the center.

I used cooking spray on a dark pan, (which thinking about it now may have been the reason) at 400 degrees for 15mins.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Crunchy dough
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2013, 03:45:09 PM »
At about 0.5-pound for about a 12-inch pizza you are on the light side for dough weight, depending upon the type of pizza you are attempting to make. With the limited fermentation time that your dough is subjected to it can be rather difficult to open the dough without developing thin spots in it, and baking the pizza in a pan may be a detriment to getting the dough to rise in the oven as it would if you were baking on a stone.  What you might do is to add additional water to the dough and also allow the dough to ferment longer, overnight in the fridge or at least 2-hours at room temperature before opening the dough into a pizza skin for topping and baking. Add sufficient additional water to just get a soft, pliable dough after the fermentation period. You might then try one of my tricks to open the dough ball into a pizza skin, that is to use a pie pin or rolling pin to open the dough ball to about 2/3 of the finished diameter, then finish opening the dough by hand. This method of opening the dough aids greatly in achieving a more uniform thickness across the diameter of the pizza skin.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Crunchy dough
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2013, 04:00:40 PM »
Well I dont have a scale, but here it is.

3 c flour, all purpose. (Didnt wanna waste bread flour)

OK, this is coming from someone with significant tightwad in his genes: Didn't want to waste flour?!?

What?!?

It's impossible to waste flour. Even though flour costs double what it cost several years ago, it's still dirt cheap. (Or is it 'flour cheap'? Anyone know the going rate for 5 lbs of dirt, or 50 lbs of dirt?)

 ;)

Offline bhopper

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Re: Crunchy dough
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2013, 05:00:40 PM »
At about 0.5-pound for about a 12-inch pizza you are on the light side for dough weight, depending upon the type of pizza you are attempting to make. With the limited fermentation time that your dough is subjected to it can be rather difficult to open the dough without developing thin spots in it, and baking the pizza in a pan may be a detriment to getting the dough to rise in the oven as it would if you were baking on a stone.  What you might do is to add additional water to the dough and also allow the dough to ferment longer, overnight in the fridge or at least 2-hours at room temperature before opening the dough into a pizza skin for topping and baking. Add sufficient additional water to just get a soft, pliable dough after the fermentation period. You might then try one of my tricks to open the dough ball into a pizza skin, that is to use a pie pin or rolling pin to open the dough ball to about 2/3 of the finished diameter, then finish opening the dough by hand. This method of opening the dough aids greatly in achieving a more uniform thickness across the diameter of the pizza skin.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Thanks Tom

Now that Ive thought it threw, your absolutely correct. Its a brand new recipe for me, so its going to be trial and error. I was developing thin spots  while strecthing. So the next time I will knead by hand and double rise the dough. I will also use a rolling pin to open it up. I was just in a hurry this morning, I was making chicken soup at the same time. Then I will post my results and go from there.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Crunchy dough
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2013, 02:58:24 PM »
Hey Ryan;
I bought some "dirt" this past summer from Walmart for $2.00 for a 40# bag ($0.05 per pound), come to think about it, I think they were referring to it as "top soil". :)
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor