Author Topic: What happends??  (Read 536 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline runeli

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12
  • Location: Thailand
  • I Love Pizza!
What happends??
« on: November 06, 2013, 07:01:46 PM »
Hi

Last 2-3 weeks i slowly start to selling my pizza to colleagues, friends and nabours. This morning i had an order of 2 pizza. Morning means early and delivery at 6 am.  Thais are funny. They like pizza for breakfast :)

I tok out the dough last night from the refrigerator and put them in the box i use. (Normaly for ealy order like this, I pre-bake the dough in the evening.)
When i start stretching the dough. it just fell apart. Like it was rotten.

I live in Thailand and the temprature in the kitchen is properly 29-30 centigrades (86f).

Can anyone tell me wy this happends?

Dought:
Flour   100% all-purpose
Water   60 %
Yeast   0,28 %
Sugar   0,84 %
Salt   1,14 %
Olive oil   8,23 %


Offline runeli

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12
  • Location: Thailand
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What happends??
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2013, 10:06:38 PM »
I learn from another post here that the dough properly was over-fermentet.

Can someone tell me how much ADY i should use for 24-hours cold fermentation - New York style. Today I use 0.28%. And how long should it rest on the counter before streatching it (30C)?

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 971
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: What happends??
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2013, 07:58:20 AM »
A couple of things stand out about your formula;
The oil level is rather high for this type of pizza. I would suggest reducing it to around 2%.
The salt level is a bit on the low side so I would suggest increasing it to 1.75 to 2%.
Your yeast level is probably a bit low for ADY, you could go as high as 0.5%.
All of this said, I doubt that the problem is with the dough formula, but rather with either the protein content of the flour (protein content might be too low) or even more likely, your finished dough temperature (the temperature of the dough immediately after mixing) is/was too high. This would cause the dough to over ferment during the overnight period, resulting in what many describe as a "rotten" dough. I would think that, under your conditions, a finished dough temperature of 70 to 75F/21 to 24C might work pretty well for you. Additionally, it would also help if you could tell us how you manage your dough after mixing. This is everything you do with the dough from the time it is removed from the mixer until you use it on the following day.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline runeli

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12
  • Location: Thailand
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: What happends??
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2013, 07:39:23 PM »
Thank you so much taking your time answering me.

I hand knead the dough. 5 min knead, 5 min rest and 5 min knead again.
I use bottle water, but probably way to warm. I have a batch going on now where i follow this formula. I also chilled the water first.

Bread flour: 100%
Sugar: 2%
Salt: 1.5%
Instant yeast: 1.5 %
Olive oil: 5%
Water: 67%

By hand i couldn't handel 67% water, so i had to use quite much flour when kneading. Probably ending up with around 60%. My batch now should be ready in 6-7 hour, but they have gone quite fare alread (ADY 1.5%) and probably to much ADY. Yesterday it was around 35 centigrades in the kitchen.

I thought my pizza always have been "perfect" and that I really know how to make a good dough. I used 30 years practise, but actually dont learn anything. 2-3 days in this forum and i feel like a new world opening. Thank you.

Where I live we dont have any kitchen equipment, but next week I'll go to Chiang mai (north of Thailand) and buy a food processor and a "kitchen helper".

Since my english is not my native language, I hope the forum can bare with my writing :)

Again thank you

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 971
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: What happends??
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2013, 02:32:47 PM »
Runeli;
Don't worry, your English is just fine.
If you don't already have one, try to pick up a stem or dial type thermometer, like you see the chef's running around with in their pocket. These are usually pretty low cost and they will work great for measuring the dough temperature. If you use some type of a closed box to store your dough in you might also consider leaving the top off of the container for the first two or three hours in the fridge/cooler to allow the dough to cool down more uniformly, then cover the containers until you're ready to use the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline GotRocks

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 255
  • Location: up to my butt in snow
  • Trying to get financing sucks!
Re: What happends??
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2013, 05:51:38 PM »
Runeli;
Don't worry, your English is just fine.
If you don't already have one, try to pick up a stem or dial type thermometer, like you see the chef's running around with in their pocket. These are usually pretty low cost and they will work great for measuring the dough temperature. If you use some type of a closed box to store your dough in you might also consider leaving the top off of the container for the first two or three hours in the fridge/cooler to allow the dough to cool down more uniformly, then cover the containers until you're ready to use the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

I changed over to a Non-contact IR thermometer for check dough temps, And I really like it.
Do you see any problems using an IR thermometer for this?
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!


 

pizzapan