Author Topic: High Hydration Dough for Cracker Crust  (Read 1254 times)

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Offline bbqchuck

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High Hydration Dough for Cracker Crust
« on: November 12, 2013, 04:16:25 PM »
I was wondering about using a high (NY style normal) hydration dough to make a cracker crust pizza.  I thought it may even give a desireable characteristic to the final crust.

So, I had some 62% beer enhanced NY dough and simply rolled it out with the aid of abundant bench flour.  I rolled it very thin very quickly and easily. Probalbly as thin as a storebought corn tortilla. I docked it without overlapping the docker's path.  I had preheated the oven to 500F with my steel plate in the oven.    I successfully launched from a wood peel with flour and semolina onto the steel.  1 minute later, I removed it to a cooling rack.  It was still not crisp, but had nice bubbles from the oven spring.   I turned the oven off and left it open for about 4-5 mins, then, with the oven OFF, I put the skin back in the still hot (350F ish) oven to dehydrate for an hour.  It was crisp at the end of the hour.   

Since this was an experiment, I didn't make a pie from it, but just broke off chips and ate it.  I really liked the bubbles from the oven spring.  It may be a substitute for laminating cracker dough.   I have pix and will post later.  But I think I'll do a topped pie soon. 


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: High Hydration Dough for Cracker Crust
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2013, 04:51:59 PM »
Chuck,

I once tried something similar to what you did and described my results in Reply 119 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.msg50909.html#msg50909. What I discovered, and reported in the same thread, is that once you get above about 45% in hydration value you start to lose the crispy characteristic of the finished crust. If you bake the skin low and slow, you will get rid of some of the moisture in the dough but the usual practice in a commercial setting where time is of the essence is to just use a lower hydration value and a shorter bake.

There is more on the above subject of using a higher hydration dough for a cracker style starting at Reply 107 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.msg50791.html#msg50791.

Peter

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: High Hydration Dough for Cracker Crust
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2013, 06:11:35 PM »
Peter,
I'll read those later, but my goal was to be able to use a NY dough to get a cracker result.  This would allow me to have one dough frozen that could accomplish two styles.   I was successful in doing that and did indeed achieve a crispy crust.  But it did take an hour of the skin being in the oven to do it.  The result looked and tasted very good.  The oven spring was significant, as my pictures will show.  This oven spring provided an effect similar to laminations.   I would imagine a convection oven would dehydrate the skin much more quickly when using at a low temperature.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2013, 06:15:22 PM by bbqchuck »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: High Hydration Dough for Cracker Crust
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2013, 09:21:53 PM »
Chuck,

I understand. I just wanted to point out that a high hydration dough does not make the best cracker style pizza. However, you seem to have found a way to be able to use the same dough for two different styles of pizza.

I look forward to seeing your photos.

Peter

Offline kdefay

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Re: High Hydration Dough for Cracker Crust
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2013, 10:31:41 PM »
I have recently been experimenting with the same thing in my shop.  I use a NY style dough at 61% hydration and have been rolling and hand-stretching out a 200g ball to make a 12" thin crust.  The biggest problem I find is that underside doesn't get very crispy due the higher hydration and fast bake time, but the outer crust is outstanding.  It's not something we are planning to add to the menu, but I just wanted to see how well it would work.  I'll make another one this week and post a photo.  Every time I make one it disappears before I have time to get the camera.

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: High Hydration Dough for Cracker Crust
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2013, 12:08:34 PM »
I've been meaning to get back to this and post my photos.  I did do a 62% dough rolled very thin and pre-baked, first on a 550F stone for bit to get oven spring, then on a screen to dehydrate it. I did get good oven spring with lots of bubbles between the dock holes, making for an effect similar to the "laminating" others have done.   I think I need to look at a much lower temperature on the screen pre-bake portion to prevent burning.  More later.


 

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