Author Topic: My first NY attempt  (Read 1571 times)

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Offline kcbbq83

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My first NY attempt
« on: March 12, 2006, 12:25:43 PM »
Over the last several days since signing on here, I've read and learned so much. What a great site and group of helpful people. I've been mixing flour water and yeast for nearly 20 yrs, I didn't realize how little I knew, at least that is changing, I hope.

Operating with crappy scales I had on hand and grocery store flour, I stirred up my first NY style crust recipe yesterday. I've read too much, and taken too many notes to be sure, but I think it's one of the Lehmann variations. My thanks to whomever is responsible.

For 2 16" pies I used the following:

25.3 oz flour (Gold Medal Better for Bread) 72*
15.9 oz water (filtered from my fridge) 76* after warming in the microwave
3/4 tsp IDY
2 tsp light olive oil
2 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp honey

Using a small (pivot head) Kitchen Aid fitted with dough hook, I mixed the water and most of the flour (~2/3 - 3/4 of total) on stir for 2 mins until it looked like very thick batter, let sit for 20 mins.

Added remaining ingredients, mixed on stir for ~ 2 mins until things were beginning to come together then went to #2 speed for a total of 10 mins after rest period.

Off Hook Dough Temp 84*. Was aiming for 79-81 :o  guess my water can be a little cooler next  time.

Gave the dough a few turns by hand (I was surprised a dough this wet was so sturdy), less than 2 mins additional kneading, divided and put in containers in the coolest part of the fridge.

Wish I had the patience to wait 2 days before making pies, no chance. Will take the dough out of the fridge at 4pm (28hrs) for pizza making at 6pm.


Any obvious problems so far?

Any advice on shaping for someone used to using a rolling pin (leaving it in the drawer today)?

I'll be cooking on a stone, with the oven set at 550* (unless advised otherwise), will probably use parchment for transfer, I have 2 peels I made myself that work quite well, but the Mrs frowns a lot about the mess the cornmeal makes in the oven.

Any advice on shaping and baking process or corrections to what I've already done would be greatly appreciated.


Offline billneild

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Re: My first NY attempt
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2006, 03:32:01 PM »
I'm just a newbie, but I have made my share of pies over the years.  Don't use a roller.  It will pinch the edges down.  Use your fingers splayed out.  The nearest thing I can liken it to is the way a quarterback receives the ball from the center only with the fingers closer together.  Do not pinch down the edge.  The idea is to have your fingers push a little so the underside of the outside of the crust "rolls" up a little.  After you have pushed down enough to get the dough to a large enough circle, say 10 to 12 inches or more hold it so it is resting on your knuckles or finger joints and gently stretch around the circumference, NOT across the diameter.  If the dough is loose enough it will almost stretch under its own weight.  When you get it to size put on the peel.  By the way, the parchment paper trick is the only way I have made make pizzas for 2 years now.  Use your second grade scissor skills to make a circle, ie fold the rectangle into a wedge, cut the ragged end, open it up and bingo!  A perfect 15 " circle if you did it right.   Paper on peel, dough on paper, perfect transfer every time.  Oven should be as hot as you can get it and the stone should be at temp. for half an hour or more.Good luck!

Bill

Offline kcbbq83

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Re: My first NY attempt
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2006, 07:57:06 PM »
Wow, what a quantum leap! So much better than anything else I've ever made, very encouraging.

Turned out my stone is only 15" (pan is 16 :-[) so ended up with something thicker than I intended, but not really a big problem.  The dough was maybe a little too easy to stretch. Oven spring was good, but the crumb was a little tight, good variety of small sized voids, just not enough big ones. Never had to pick the crust up, just pushed it out to the size of the parchment circle (cut to size of stone), probably used less than 1 Tbsp of bench flour for 2 pies this way.

Toppings were all cheap grocery store stuff, pepperoni, Canadian bacon and ground beef seasoned with sausage seasonings (i'm on a low sodium diet). Shredded mozz, and cheddar.
Just need to quit cooking my sauce all together, I never considered how much the sauce cooks on the pie, so only reduced it half as much as I used too, but really didn't need to at all. Your read, you try, you learn!

Will post some pics as soon as I locate that darned cable.

Many thanks to all those who have contributed to the wealth of information contained in the archives here, great, great resource.



Thanks for all the good

Online Pete-zza

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Re: My first NY attempt
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2006, 09:10:15 PM »
kcbbq83,

Your recipe looks in good shape. And, yes, it is a clone of the basic Lehmann formulation.

I note from your comments that you used a 20-minute autolyse. One of the benefits of using an autolyse is to cut back on the total kneading time. So, next time, you may want to cut back on the 10 minute knead time you used. As between overkneading and underkneading, I believe underkneading is better, especially if you are after bigger holes in the crumb. You might also consider using 75 degrees F as your targeted finished dough temperature. When I first started with the Lehmann doughs, I used around 80 degrees F. That was the finished dough temperature that Tom Lehmann himself recommended. Later, it occurred to me that a home refrigerator operated at a slightly higher temperature than a commercial cooler as used by pizza operators for whom the Lehmann dough formulation was originally intended. Consequently, I started using the 75 degree F target. Subsequently, I read where Tom Lehmann made the same recommendation to a home pizza maker. To get a finished dough temperature of around 75 degrees, you will have to use cool to cold water, depending on your room temperature. As summer and warm weather approach, you will want to use even cooler water. Using a shorter knead time should also reduce heat buildup in the dough.

You can always scale back your recipe if you found the dough and crust to be too thick. If you need help doing this, let me know. It should be easy to do since you specified the weights of the flour and water. The other ingredients can easily be converted to weights.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 12, 2006, 09:14:58 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline kcbbq83

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Re: My first NY attempt
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2006, 10:56:11 PM »
Peter, thanks for the tips, I went with that particular recipe because it gave both weights and volumes for the heavy ingredients and had volumes for the light stuff that I knew I couldn't weigh with my current scales. I had a much easier time forming the second crust and I got some bigger voids with it, specifically, I didn't squish all the good voids out messing with it too much.

When I'm ready to try again, I'll do the math, post results and hope y'all will check my work.

Pasty AP flour tasting crust is a thing of the past, whoo hooo!!! ;D

Offline kcbbq83

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Re: My first NY attempt
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2006, 11:01:29 PM »
I made pizza that didn't suck, I'm ready to make more, now ;)


 

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