Author Topic: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?  (Read 584 times)

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Offline GarlicLover

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Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« on: November 20, 2013, 03:26:28 PM »
As you all know, here in Germany I don't have the same types/brands of flour as in the states. For example there is no King Arthur flour, so I have to make other choices and rely on number-types such as 405, 550, etc.

At the beginning I used all-purpose flour (Type 405), and then I switched to bread flour (Type 550). Now I found a Type 1050, and would like to know your thoughts on it. Here is a comparison between Type 550 and Type 1050.

100 g of Type 550 wheat flour contains:

Energy 1474 kJ / 352 kcal
Fat 1,1 g (of which are 0,2 g saturated fatty acids)
Carbohydrates 72,0 g (of which is 1,1 g sugar)
Fiber 3,5 g
Protein 10,6 g
Salt 0,005 g

100 g of Type 1050 wheat flour contains:

Energy 1454 kJ / 347 kcal
Fat 1,8 g (of which are 0,3 g saturated fatty acids)
Carbohydrates 67,2 g (of which is 0,8 g sugar)
Fiber 5,2 g
Protein 12,1 g
Salt 0,005 g


Which of these two types would be more suitable for pizza, and why?

Thank you! :D


Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2013, 03:46:08 PM »
What temperature are you cooking at?

Offline GarlicLover

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2013, 03:56:43 PM »
Only 250 Celsius (482 Fahrenheit).

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2013, 04:14:37 PM »
550 would be my choice. I think 1050 would be too full-flavored for my taste in pizza. I' save it for rye bread.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2013, 04:16:30 PM »
GarlicLover,

Do you know the maximum moisture content of the two flours? In the U.S., that number is typically around 14%. European flours can be 15% or more. The difference is useful to be able to convert the protein values from one system to the other to compare their values.

Peter

Offline GarlicLover

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2013, 04:17:09 PM »
What I forgot to add... this flour type 1050 is just a tiny bit darker than type 550. It's really not much darker, but I don't know if this is a problem.

Here is a picture - left side is 1050, right side is 550.

Offline GarlicLover

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2013, 04:22:08 PM »
Do you know the maximum moisture content of the two flours?

No clue really.

550 would be my choice. I think 1050 would be too full-flavored for my taste in pizza. I' save it for rye bread.

Alright, thanks. Just one more question: Would it be any useful to mix the two flours, 550 and 1050 together? Would this serve any purpose at all?

In any case... there's a website on the net which has to do with german flour types, although it's a bit misleading to say the least: http://www.germanfoodguide.com/flours.cfm

It lists Type 812 as bread flour and 550 as all-purpose, which is AFAIK incorrect. It also lists Type 1050 as high-gluten? :-X

If anyone could provide more insight, I'd appreciate it. For now I'll stick with 550.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2013, 04:25:46 PM »
Alright, thanks. Just one more question: Would it be any useful to mix the two flours, 550 and 1050 together? Would this serve any purpose at all?

I don't know what other than to make for a stronger flavored crust. It doesn't cost much to find out, however. I would always encourage people to try things side-by-side if they are curious which they would like more. Dough is cheap.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline misterschu

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2013, 04:51:42 PM »
550 would be my choice. I think 1050 would be too full-flavored for my taste in pizza. I' save it for rye bread.

Are you basing this on the fiber content? or some omitted info?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2013, 04:54:45 PM »
Are you basing this on the fiber content? or some omitted info?

No, like I said - just because it is a more full-flavored flour - i.e. higher extraction rate than a typical white flour. That's why it has a slightly darker color.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2013, 04:56:22 PM »
GarlicLover,

It is hard to translate what we know about U.S. flours to flours that you have available to you in Germany. So, your best bet is to experiment with the flours you have on hand.

Here is another article that discusses German flours: http://vegetarische.wordpress.com/2010/01/30/german-flour/. We do have several members from Germany. Maybe they will be able to steer you in the right direction.

Peter

Offline misterschu

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2013, 05:23:45 PM »
No, like I said - just because it is a more full-flavored flour - i.e. higher extraction rate than a typical white flour. That's why it has a slightly darker color.

I see, higher number is a higher extraction rate.  That was the info I was missing.

Offline GarlicLover

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Re: Flour Type 1050... thoughts?
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2013, 05:42:23 PM »
GarlicLover,

It is hard to translate what we know about U.S. flours to flours that you have available to you in Germany. So, your best bet is to experiment with the flours you have on hand.

Here is another article that discusses German flours: http://vegetarische.wordpress.com/2010/01/30/german-flour/. We do have several members from Germany. Maybe they will be able to steer you in the right direction.

Peter

Thanks for that link. So based on that website, it seems that Type 812 is high-gluten and would perhaps be the best choice.

I'll experiment some time and see what happens.


 

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