Author Topic: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.  (Read 6031 times)

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Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #60 on: November 24, 2013, 10:23:51 PM »
Also, the dough boxes that I believe Scott linked to are way deeper than what you need. The boxes on the linked page are like 6" deep; the ones you need are about 3" deep. The right ones are surely considerably cheaper than the deep ones, but I think they're still around $20 each.

Great catch, Ryan.  I googled 'dough boxes' and just pulled the first that came up, I wasn't aware that they came in different depths.  6" is way too deep.

BJ, for someone starting out on their pizza career, your pizza is way better than I expected. Dial in the yeast and stretch about a hundred pies and you'll be on your way. Btw, a good stretching exercise is to take a throwaway ball of dough and stretch it as far as you can possibly stretch it, fixing any holes that arise.  That's a great way to get a feel of how far you can take it.

One thing to be aware of, the Hobart mixes AND kneads the dough.  Stick it in the Hobart on the lowest setting until it's just past a cottage cheese appearance, then dump it out and start weighing it into portions.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2013, 10:26:52 PM by scott123 »


Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #61 on: November 24, 2013, 10:26:16 PM »
Also, that mixer appears to be really old. I think it's actually pretty cool. I've never even seen a mixer like that. I'm surprised no one else has said anything about it.

These ancient Hobarts are actually pretty common in pizzerias.  I think if it were a brand new Hobart, people would react more, since those are so rare.

Online Aimless Ryan

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #62 on: November 24, 2013, 10:27:19 PM »
after I took it out of the mixer I kneaded the whole thing for maybe 3 minutes. Folding and pressing over and over, then i cut, balled, and set in a container. Maybe it's because I'm super slow at balling? I can't seem to do it right.

That's probably what it is. I think you should just take the dough out of the mixer bowl and start scaling right away. Once you've scaled all the dough pieces, you can give each piece of dough a few kneads to begin the rounding process. It might not seem like such a change will affect the dough much differently than how you're currently doing it, but I think it will make a noticeable difference.

I agree with Scott. Even though it may seem like I was being a little critical, I think you're doing great.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #63 on: November 24, 2013, 10:36:18 PM »
I'm talking to my uncle about ovens and stuff.

He's saying if he had a shop, he'd use a conveyor belt and a sheeter.

If I owned a shop, I'd want a brick oven and hand stretch all the dough.

That's just because the way I like it seems to be more traditional? But what do I know, His way is for when your business is really busy.

What do you guys think? Brick oven + hand stretch vs conveyor oven + sheeter?
« Last Edit: November 24, 2013, 10:39:08 PM by PizzaGuy209 »

Online Aimless Ryan

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #64 on: November 24, 2013, 10:41:23 PM »
I like all kinds of pizza. I like hand-stretched pizza. I like pizza that's formed in a pan (like deep dish). I like certain kinds of sheeted dough, too.

Conveyor ovens are evil. They're for cheap pizza that requires no skills. Conveyor ovens are glorified hair dryers.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #65 on: November 24, 2013, 10:45:24 PM »
I just like traditional ovens...but if conveyors work though...why not? As long as it does a good job?.

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #66 on: November 24, 2013, 11:08:52 PM »
BJ, you should really make a drive into San Francisco and sample a few pizzas there.  There's a few solid NY style places and a handful of Neapolitan pizzerias.  Both Ryan and I are very anti-chain, along with most of the forum, but if, after tasting some good NY style and good Neapolitan pies, you prefer chain (conveyor), then follow your bliss. But truly world class NY style pies (the style you made today), can't be made on a conveyor, regardless of what some people on this forum might say.

And a sheeter doesn't really do NY style justice either- although it's a valuable component to other styles.

Online Aimless Ryan

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #67 on: November 24, 2013, 11:20:48 PM »
You can make decent pizza with a conveyor oven, but you can't make a true NY style pizza with a conveyor oven. (There are a few people who would dispute that statement, but I'm not gonna argue with anyone about it. If anyone chooses to dispute my statement, I'll let Scott argue for me.)

In a pizzeria setting, I want my customers to see us work the ovens, whether I'm selling NY style, deep dish, stuffed, cracker, or any other pizza style. That's worth money right there. Besides, deck ovens make better pizza, which is also worth money if you do things right. Conveyor ovens may have been cool and fascinating in 1980, but now they're the norm and ovens without moving parts are once again fascinating to pizza consumers.

There's a whole new pizza market just because people are fascinated by wood-fired ovens. There's probably not more than a couple handfuls of pizzeria owners in this country who actually know how to use their beautiful wood-fired ovens, but they're selling lotsa pizza anyway just because pizza consumers are fascinated by the concept of wood-fired ovens.

Online Aimless Ryan

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #68 on: November 24, 2013, 11:23:21 PM »
And a sheeter doesn't really do NY style justice either- although it's a valuable component to other styles.

I hope I didn't imply that I think it's OK to use a sheeter for NY style. I need a sheeter very badly, but certainly not for NY style. I need a sheeter for laminated cracker style, which is a serious workout with a rolling pin.

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #69 on: November 24, 2013, 11:30:50 PM »
I hope I didn't imply that I think it's OK to use a sheeter for NY style.

I didn't take it that way, Ryan, I was just conveying to BJ the importance of looking at equipment from a style centric perspective.


Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #70 on: November 24, 2013, 11:32:22 PM »
Oh I prefer brick ovens over conveyor ovens 100%

I was just thinking if I did go into business with my uncle, he'd want conveyor and sheeter.

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #71 on: November 24, 2013, 11:35:54 PM »
I was just thinking if I did go into business with my uncle, he'd want conveyor and sheeter.

BJ, you have an abundance of short sighted people in your life  ;D

Master the pizza at home, bring him a slice, blow his mind, and, when he says "we have to sell this," calmly explain that it can't be made in a conveyor.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #72 on: November 24, 2013, 11:41:12 PM »
BJ, you have an abundance of short sighted people in your life  ;D

Master the pizza at home, bring him a slice, blow his mind, and, when he says "we have to sell this," calmly explain that it can't be made in a conveyor.

I agree. It sucks man. He's been making bread since the 90's! Maybe he loves the conveyor so much because he gets very large amounts of orders. Specifically pita bread.  He knows his ingredients, but idk about pizza equipment.

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #73 on: November 25, 2013, 01:17:35 AM »
I agree. It sucks man. He's been making bread since the 90's! Maybe he loves the conveyor so much because he gets very large amounts of orders. Specifically pita bread.  He knows his ingredients, but idk about pizza equipment.

Well if you think he might be able to offer you a job... in this economic climate, you might want to take it.  I typically shun all things conveyor, so I probably won't be able to help you much, but this forum has a few notable members who swear by them. To get the most out of the conveyor, I don't think you'll be making authentic NY style pizza, but I'm sure you can make better pizza than the chains, and be quite profitable.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #74 on: November 25, 2013, 02:36:03 AM »
Man, I freaking love you all.

I think I may have found a new passion... Im thinking about pizza 24/7 lol...

I hope to learn and hopefully one day I'll be on here teaching newbies like you all taught me! (I'm a super newbie still  :chef: )

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #75 on: November 25, 2013, 03:57:13 AM »
What does it mean when bubbles form while cooling the dough?

Offline waltertore

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #76 on: November 25, 2013, 06:10:58 AM »
My uncle actually owns a bakery. I'm thinking about asking him if I could practice there. He has a conveyor belt oven and a better mixer. I'll buy the ingredients and all that..He loves making pizza too, even though his focus is regular bread.

I shared some of the ingredients you guys gave me for pizza dough and he liked them.

I'm sure if I asked him if we could go after they close and try a few pizzas, he'd be happy to join me and make a few of his own.


One thing that scott mentioned, and I agree with him 100% is, I need to understand the recipes and what each one does to the dough. I think once I do that I can play around to make the perfect batch.


That is perfect!  I worked in many bakeries that had stone deck ovens that they did their artisan breads in. I made lots of pizzas in them for the staff to eat.   Ryan is right on the depth of the dough boxes. 

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #77 on: November 25, 2013, 06:22:39 AM »

That is perfect!  I worked in many bakeries that had stone deck ovens that they did their artisan breads in. I made lots of pizzas in them for the staff to eat.   Ryan is right on the depth of the dough boxes.

Well my uncle is one of the best bread distributors in this town. I think he's actually one of the only bakeries that make top quality Pita Bread. He's been at it since the 90's and since he gets so busy he has to use a conveyor belt (which is why I believe he's so obsessed with using them for pizza) Because they make it so much easier for him when hes trying to push out 2000 pita bread in less than a days work. He made a pretty sweet wheat bread pizza the other day at his house. He comes over and we talk dough, he tells me about what each recipe does.

Tell me if hes right:

I may or may have not completely butchered what he told me or misinterpreted it.
This is all a rough translation of our conversation. He tried to simplify it for me.


He told me yeast makes the dough rise (obviously)
Salt adds a bit of flavor and keeps the dough down. (super rough translation)
Sugar basically just helps the dough expand. Won't add too much flavor.
Oil keeps the dough from sticking.

Offline deb415611

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #78 on: November 25, 2013, 06:40:48 AM »


Tell me if hes right:

I may or may have not completely butchered what he told me or misinterpreted it.
This is all a rough translation of our conversation. He tried to simplify it for me.


He told me yeast makes the dough rise (obviously)
Salt adds a bit of flavor and keeps the dough down. (super rough translation)
Sugar basically just helps the dough expand. Won't add too much flavor.
Oil keeps the dough from sticking.

sugar also promotes browning
oil also helps tenderize a dough

I'll see if I can find something good that explains how different ingredients in doughs

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #79 on: November 25, 2013, 06:42:30 AM »
sugar also promotes browning
oil also helps tenderize a dough

I'll see if I can find something good that explains how different ingredients in doughs

Yes! I forgot he told me it adds color.

He didn't mention much about the tenderizing though.  I think he said something like using less oil makes the dough more elastic? I can't remember.


 

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