Author Topic: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.  (Read 5980 times)

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Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #100 on: November 25, 2013, 11:02:31 PM »
Say I make 2 10 lb batches of dough (that's 20 20" pizzas) and they all sell out before the day is over and some customers come in...

Would it be okay if I made and cooked fresh dough?

And since I'm asking what to do if I don't have enough dough, what do I do with leftover dough balls? Do I just refrigerate them and do the same thing the next day? How long can you typically leave a dough ball in the fridge?

First of all, you want to develop an ability to gauge demand so that you don't have too little or too many dough balls. It's not easy to do starting out, but you get a better sense for it as you go along.

Between the two, too many is preferable, since using a leftover dough ball the next day is much better than serving your customers a tasteless quick ferment dough. Some pizzeria owners will make a set amount of dough, and, when that runs out, they'll close shop.  There's a certain romance to this, and it prevents serving imperfect dough, but, imo, it's a good way to anger your customers.

Gauge the demand, make a few extra dough balls, and use those first thing the next day.

If, say, you're doing a 48 hour ferment, at any given time, you'll have dough that's ready (48 hours) and dough that's been fermenting for 24 hour.  In that scenario, if you're in a jam, you can pull from the 24 hour batch.


Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #101 on: November 25, 2013, 11:03:49 PM »
525 is the highest

525 is actually written on the dial, or does the dial say 500 and you have one more mark beyond it?

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #102 on: November 25, 2013, 11:04:53 PM »
One more mark beyond it

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #103 on: November 25, 2013, 11:13:59 PM »
Well, to match the effect of the deck oven you were using at 570, you'll need a conductive hearth material with plenty of thermal mass- 1/2" steel plate. This will give you the same results at the deck oven did.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #104 on: November 25, 2013, 11:37:08 PM »
I might just go there at night when they're closed. He won't mind.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #105 on: November 25, 2013, 11:46:02 PM »
These were huge. Tasted good though. I melted butter, added some salt and garlic powder and brushed the raw dough. Cooked it and lightly added a little more garlic powder. I need to make them way thinner and smaller.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #106 on: November 25, 2013, 11:47:25 PM »
Id prefer the 24 hour ferment by the way. Its just easier.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #107 on: November 26, 2013, 07:59:26 AM »
I added 6 gallons warm water to the mixer (Not too warm or cold, more room temp).
I believe you meant to say six pounds of water, not six gallons.

Peter

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #108 on: November 26, 2013, 08:00:23 AM »
I believe you meant to say six pounds of water, not six gallons.

Peter

Oops! Yes, 6 lbs. Thanks pete.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #109 on: November 26, 2013, 09:05:48 AM »
Norma,

The ingredients I used were:

Flour (100%):4526.43 g  |  159.66 oz | 9.98 lbs
Water (61%):2761.12 g  |  97.39 oz | 6.09 lbs
IDY (.5%):22.63 g | 0.8 oz | 0.05 lbs | 7.51 tsp | 2.5 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):79.21 g | 2.79 oz | 0.17 lbs | 4.73 tbsp | 0.3 cups
Oil (3%):135.79 g | 4.79 oz | 0.3 lbs | 10.06 tbsp | 0.63 cups
Sugar (1%):45.26 g | 1.6 oz | 0.1 lbs | 11.35 tsp | 3.78 tbsp
Total (167.25%):7570.45 g | 267.04 oz | 16.69 lbs | TF = 0.085
Single Ball:757.05 g | 26.7 oz | 1.67 lbs
10 balls total.

The way I did it:

I added 6 gallons warm water to the mixer (Not too warm or cold, more room temp).
I added 4.7 oz oil to the mixer with the water along with 2.5 tbsp ADY (I didn't have IDY)
I mixed that by hand for a few minutes. I let it sit for 5-10 minutes (I should have waited longer, 10-15 mins maybe)
After that I weighed 10 lbs flour, added the 4.7 tbsp salt and 3.8 tbsp sugar to the weighed flour.
I turned on the mixer at speed 1 and slowly started adding in the flour.
After it formed, I took it out and kneaded it (I now know I'm not supposed to knead after its done mixing, the hobart kneads it good enough once the dough is formed)
After kneading I cut, weighed, balled and stored.

I'm late to the party but noticed some things worth pointing out - your dough balls weigh 757G each, assuming you're making one pie with them that's either one really big pie or one really thick pie, how did you end up with this number? Also, I personally don't practice it since I make such low volume but I notice you ball directly and don't bulk ferment, perhaps that might be something worth looking into. There's been discussions and members strongly advocating that a double rise is crucial for making good pizza but as I recall there hasn't been much proof to support why. Can anyone with more experience elaborate?
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Offline JD

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #110 on: November 26, 2013, 12:11:19 PM »
I checked the fridge and I put it below 1.. 1 is the lowest it will go. Theres an off option too.. the owner doesnt care though

If "off" is next to 1, then you probably have your refrigerator set to the maximum temperature. For example if the scale is 1-5, 5 may actually be the coldest setting, not 1.

Josh

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #111 on: November 26, 2013, 01:44:21 PM »
I'm late to the party but noticed some things worth pointing out - your dough balls weigh 757G each, assuming you're making one pie with them that's either one really big pie or one really thick pie, how did you end up with this number? Also, I personally don't practice it since I make such low volume but I notice you ball directly and don't bulk ferment, perhaps that might be something worth looking into. There's been discussions and members strongly advocating that a double rise is crucial for making good pizza but as I recall there hasn't been much proof to support why. Can anyone with more experience elaborate?


BJ made dough balls for his shop, where they were making 20" pies.

Here's the proof supporting double rises.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,16761.0.html

I was re-balling for a while, but then stopped.  The re-balling step involved too much labor (washing my dough pans, re-oiling, cleaning a flour-y bench) and I wasn't discerning much difference between my re-balled crust and non-re-balled crust. I will probably revisit it at some point.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #112 on: November 26, 2013, 03:39:40 PM »
Here's the proof supporting double rises.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,16761.0.html

I don't see anything I would consider proof there. I love fazzari's work, but I don't see NY style pizza in those pictures. Especially when I put on my scott123 glasses (which are usually on anyway).

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #113 on: November 26, 2013, 03:44:15 PM »
The re-balling step involved too much labor (washing my dough pans, re-oiling, cleaning a flour-y bench) and I wasn't discerning much difference between my re-balled crust and non-re-balled crust.

Which is precisely why it's not done in any pizzeria that intends to stay in business. Extra work costs money. Spending extra money for absolutely no reason puts you out of business.

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #114 on: November 26, 2013, 04:02:09 PM »
Ryan, when I first saw John's results, I, too, thought that it might be a style specific phenomenon and that it wouldn't be applicable to what I do.  But I tried it, and I did see an improvement.  It's just, logistically, right now, the improvement, for me, isn't worth the extra labor.

I really need to get off my butt and convert my existing recipe to a bulk version.  These days, though, when I make pizza- which is incredibly infrequently, I want tried and true results.  If I experiment with a bulk, it's going to take some trial and error.

I believe in John's results. I also believe that bulks can be added both to home regimes and commercial ones without additional labor. It's just a matter of time before I incorporate a bulk in my recipe- and never look back.

There is a simple, classic elegance to making the dough, balling it, letting it rise, and then making the pizza, but then there's also a simple, no fuss somewhat classic aspect to a 2 hour proof (rather than a 2 day proof). But when the evidence points towards superior results with greater complexity (and one might say lesser historical accuracy), then you have no choice but to go where it takes you.

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #115 on: November 26, 2013, 04:24:21 PM »
......    but then there's also a simple, no fuss somewhat classic aspect to a 2 hour proof (rather than a 2 day proof).

Like we're gonna see you waiting in line at Di Fara ? :drool: :-D
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Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #116 on: November 26, 2013, 04:25:18 PM »
I reball because my dough comes out square and when I try to take it out it gets ruined.

Offline PizzaGuy209

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #117 on: November 26, 2013, 04:26:08 PM »
If "off" is next to 1, then you probably have your refrigerator set to the maximum temperature. For example if the scale is 1-5, 5 may actually be the coldest setting, not 1.

Yeah i put it below 1 hoping it would go up around 34 from 27... but it doesnt.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #118 on: November 26, 2013, 04:39:06 PM »
I reball because my dough comes out square and when I try to take it out it gets ruined.

Yeah, well you just started doing this like last week, plus you're working with crappy equipment and dealing with a bunch of nutjobs. You get some time to figure out a few things (like how to keep from having the square dough problem). That is, you're allowed to do it "wrong" for a while, because we all know you're doing everything you can to start getting it right. It's not gonna happen in a day or two.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 05:10:59 PM by Aimless Ryan »

Offline scott123

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Re: New to pizza making and I might be in a bit of a predicament.
« Reply #119 on: November 26, 2013, 05:59:31 PM »
I reball because my dough comes out square and when I try to take it out it gets ruined.

Once you get the right proofing pans, that all changes.