Author Topic: A Blackstone Down Under  (Read 35590 times)

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Offline dylandylan

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A Blackstone Down Under
« on: November 23, 2013, 02:00:06 AM »
I've started this thread to record my adventure with the Blackstone gas oven making neapolitanesque pizza.

To kick things off here's me and my pizza cave as it stands.

G'day.





Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2013, 02:16:05 AM »
Today's pies.

#1 a poor man's "Craigherita" - a Margherita with chunky peppadew chili oil, not calabrian chili... still working on sourcing those calabrians.   

#2 a white pie with a solitary zucchini blossom, with fresh flat leaf parsley, oregano and chives in support.

#3 another crack at a Craigherita.

Fresh home made mozz from cows just down the road, and regular dry mozz also added on the white pie.

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2013, 02:28:33 AM »
Continued...

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2013, 05:49:23 AM »
I've started this thread to record my adventure with the Blackstone gas oven making neapolitanesque pizza.

To kick things off here's me and my pizza cave as it stands.

G'day.

Nice to meet you Dylan. This is a great start! Thank you for sharing your beautiful pizzas. I look forward to your future posts. Good day!

Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2013, 06:15:51 AM »
Welcome Dylan! Nice post and great looking pies!
Il miglior fabbro

Offline jeff v

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2013, 07:02:05 AM »
I wouldn't call that a poor mans anything-they all look great. The pizza cave and it's views look very cool too. For your records sake and others curiosity you may want to post your current dough formulation.
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline norma427

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2013, 08:13:15 AM »
Dylan,

Beautiful job on your pizzas in your Blackstone.  :chef:

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2013, 08:35:51 AM »
Simply gorgeous again. I'm honored by the thought.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Tampa

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2013, 08:51:36 AM »
Pure yum right there.

Is it OK to ask about the purple door? ;D

Dave

Offline thezaman

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2013, 11:49:18 AM »
Dylan, beautiful pizzas. is your oven modified at all? i would love for you to share your dough and cheese making method. the cheese has a little yellow tint to it. is that from the high butterfat of the fresh milk? you didn't skim any fat off of the milk did you? last time i tried fresh milk cheese i got the same color as yours. i might have to try it again after seeing your impressive pizzas!
« Last Edit: November 23, 2013, 06:37:24 PM by thezaman »


Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2013, 02:02:07 PM »
Thanks for the kind words.  I still feel like I'm cheating using a Blackstone.  I've posted scraps of information about my process across the forum of late, but I'll repeat/consolidate it here.

A quick disclaimer... Invariably I vary things from one bake to the next, either subtly or radically.  As an example, I'm nearly out of flour right now, and I don't intend to buy more of the same, so I'll experiment with something else... which means I also expect to alter hydration ratios, ferment times, etc. so it could be that my next bake is nothing like this one.   I'm also very much learning, seeking advice, and adapting what I do based on curiosity/opportunity/optimizing/whim/advice.  I don't consider myself an authority on anything, but very happy to share what works for me.   I'm also a poor note taker and instruction follower... sometimes what I write isn't exactly what happened... it's just the best that I can recall.

Anyway... as at November 24 2013, this is what I do:

Starter: My starter is one I made back in 2008 using this method over on Breadtopia.

Starter workflow:  I keep my starter in the fridge all week until about 10 hours before I'm going to make dough. I take it out of the fridge, feed it, and leave it at room temp (60f-70f) during the day.  After 10 hours it is very active, I take what I need to make dough, and put the rest back in the fridge for another week.

Dough formula:
Formula for this batch (3 pizzas) was:
Flour:    340.65 g | 12.02 oz | 0.75 lbs
Water:    220.75 g | 7.79 oz | 0.49 lbs
Salt:    6.81 g | 0.24 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.22 tsp | 0.41 tbsp
Starter:    7.48 g | 0.26 oz | 0.02 lbs
Single Ball:   191.9 g | 6.77 oz | 0.42 lbs
Total:    575.7 g | 20.31 oz | 1.27 lbs  | TF = N/A

Flour: for this batch was "Elfin Home Life" pure flour. It's a standard NZ supermarket brand, nothing exotic. 11% protein.

Dough workflow:  Combine everything in a bowl, mix until a shaggy mass.  Leave to rest for 15 minutes.  Knead for about 5 minutes.  Rest for about 15 minutes, and the stretch & fold. Repeat 15 minute rest and stretch & fold 4 times (I think).  Then leave the dough in a covered bowl for 24 hours.  After 24 hours, divide and ball, putting the balls into rectangular airtight plastic box, 3 to a box. Leave the balls for another 24 hours - or in this case about 20 hours until bake time].   They flatten out and touch the edges and each other, but that's all part of the fun.

Oven:  Blackstone 1575 patio oven, with the 10PSI regulator (I gather some models now come with a 5PSI). Using standard "swap a bottle" gas which in New Zealand I gather is a Propane/Butane mix, quite a high % of butane, but can't find anything definitive to confirm this.

Oven Mods: note I'm not mechanically minded, so if I can do these mods, anyone can.  1) raised platter so it sits about 1/2" above the body. 2) aftermarket bearing installed below the collar. 3) 8x washers placed under the stone separating it from the platter 4) "Chauflector" installed - in my case it's a bent $3 cheese grater.

Bake workflow:  I'm running the regulator one turn back from completely open. I get the stone to about 750f (a little more near the perimeter of the stone) for launch.  At launch crank the flame up a lot (makes a good noise and temps rise very quickly a fair bit (haven't measured how much).   During the bake I've taken to shuffling the pie to the back/center of the stone every 1/4 rotation, so the cornicione is always coming through the hot zone.  It takes constant attention, but seems to help a lot with the 10" pies.  I bring the flame back down to "idling" in between bakes.

I haven't timed my bakes...  I think it's 1:30 - 2:00 but I'm not sure!

Making fresh mozzarella: I'm very lucky to commute past a farm that sells small quantities of raw milk from a herd of grass grazing jersey cows.  Milk is unskimmed high fat.  My process is:  put 2.4l milk into a double-boiler, add 1tsp citric acid dissolved in 10ml water.  Bring it all up to 34c.  Stir in 2.5ml vegetarian liquid rennet and leave to set for about 30 minutes.  Cut the curd, bring up to 42c while slowly bringing the curd mass together.  Strain curds through cheese cloth and hang to drain for an hour.  Fill a saucepan with water and heat to 75c.  Cut the drained curd mass into manaeable chunks, lower a curd chunk into water, let it warm up, then work it carefully by hand.  Repeat this about 4-5 times until the curd is silky and stretching easily, then ball and put into ice water.  Then store in water (no salt! made this mistake once and you get slimy mozz!).

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2013, 02:15:34 PM »
And @Tampa the purple door...   It's either an eyesore or a quirky mood lifter depending on your perspective.  It's always a talking point with guests.     It's an old lean-to shed, barely holding itself together.  It was painted festively before we moved in, my wife loves it, and I don't hate it, so it stays as-is.   The rest of the house is painted somewhat more conservatively.   The colored shed happens to not be visible at all from the main house. 

(3rd pic is an old pizza, not cooked in the Blackstone)


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2013, 02:18:56 PM »
Purple door with gold trim - I thought you went to LSU.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2013, 02:28:12 PM »
Hah.  The colors around these parts are close, but blue with gold trim http://www.thehighlanders.co.nz

Offline Tampa

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2013, 02:30:23 PM »
And @Tampa the purple door...   It's either an eyesore or a quirky mood lifter depending on your perspective.  It's always a talking point with guests.     It's an old lean-to shed, barely holding itself together.  It was painted festively before we moved in, my wife loves it, and I don't hate it, so it stays as-is.   The rest of the house is painted somewhat more conservatively.   The colored shed happens to not be visible at all from the main house. 
It is a mood lifter for me - memories of the good old days around Berkeley.
Dave

Offline arspistorica

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2013, 04:40:34 PM »
You Kiwis sure make beautiful fush, chups and puzza!  Down under representin'!

Your parsley leaves are effin' huge!  Looks almost like branch celery leaves.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2013, 05:06:40 PM by arspistorica »
"Senza il mio territorio sarei solo un panificatore."
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Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2013, 07:56:09 PM »
The flat leaf parsley is growing in the glasshouse under the tomatoes.  With such a sheltered life it thrives with giant leaves.  Love the taste and My wife and I go through bucket loads of the stuff in various dishes.   I've thought the same thing about the similarity with celery,  I figure they must be related somehow but haven't looked it up.

Offline PizzaJerk

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2013, 12:31:11 PM »
Quite intriguing and inspiring. Clearly the passion is present in your work!

Regards,
Anthony
May I glorify the Lord in all that I do.

Offline Roman

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2013, 06:03:21 AM »
Apart from the pizzas that look great, I'm enjoying the visual narrative to get to that point. What's great about the BSO is that it can be adapted to everyone's pizza making cave. Your place looks to be one that will inspire many great pies to come. Thanks for sharing.

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2013, 03:34:47 AM »
Thanks Roman!

So this weekend's pizza begins with uh-oh!    Normally I would take the starter out of the fridge in the morning, feed it immediately and leave it at room temperature all day, and then make dough in the evening.   For some reason this week I thought I'd meddle with things and I took the starter out of the fridge last night, didn't feed it immediately but instead left it at room temperature overnight, fed it this morning, left it for the day and finally made dough earlier this evening. 

This variation was just to see if I'm perhaps not using my starter in the optimal way.

So the good news and the bad news is that compared to my usual routine the starter is hyper-active.  Normally I wouldn't expect to see any fermentation activity during the first couple of hours, but this dough is really going for it.   If it continues at this rate it'll all be over long before I plan to make pizza in about 45 hours.   As much as I've become a room-temp ferment convert, I'm putting this one in the fridge.  Last pic of underside is about 3 hours after mixing, dough contains 1.3% starter.



 

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