Author Topic: A Blackstone Down Under  (Read 24709 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #340 on: August 09, 2014, 01:04:48 PM »
Dave,

Technically, yeast starts to die at around 140-143 degrees F, which usually takes place in the oven. If the yeast is put in with the flour, which acts as a buffer, one can use water at a temperature of around 120-130 degrees F without harming the yeast.

Peter


Offline parallei

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #341 on: August 09, 2014, 02:31:05 PM »
Looking good!

Offline Tampa

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #342 on: August 09, 2014, 02:43:44 PM »
Dave,

Technically, yeast starts to die at around 140-143 degrees F, which usually takes place in the oven. If the yeast is put in with the flour, which acts as a buffer, one can use water at a temperature of around 120-130 degrees F without harming the yeast.

Peter
Thanks Peter!

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #343 on: August 09, 2014, 02:51:36 PM »
wow..simply awesome pies...  and the mannequin photo bombed as well..   :-D   Really nice pies dylan...the marg is perfect..  my marg didn't goes as well  last night so i felt cheated.. :'(
Great stuff as usual ... ;D

chris

Beautiful as always. I really like the look of that Margherita.

Thanks Chris, Craig, the marg was a winner.  I'm not usually a slapper but tried it with opening this pie.

I'm at a loss for words.  All the superlatives have were awarded to your earlier creations, and now these....   So, um, I think those pies look pretty good. :chef:  Edit - I think they look simply amazing!

FWIIW, I like the window warm-up and use it for refrigerated sourdough and dough in a pinch.  I also use warm water sometimes.  In every case, I monitor frequently to ensure the temp well-below the 130F where yeast dies.  These techniques seem to work well, but I haven't searched through the threads to confirm the science. :-[

Dave

Thanks Dave  :)   And thanks for the thoughts around the yeast-killing temp.  I was paranoidly checking the temp often too, it was getting up to about 95f when they'd had enough, so only by luck I hadn't fried them!

Pizzas look great Dylan!

Chad
Thanks Chad!


Technically, yeast starts to die at around 140-143 degrees F, which usually takes place in the oven. If the yeast is put in with the flour, which acts as a buffer, one can use water at a temperature of around 120-130 degrees F without harming the yeast.

Peter

Thanks Peter, Dave - quick question to demonstrate my ignorance, you're referring to yeast, I assume same temperatures would kill sourdough culture?    I'll probably do more of the sun-assist in the coming months and would be good if I don't kill too many dough balls.

Looking good!
Thanks!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #344 on: August 09, 2014, 03:21:35 PM »
Dylan,

That's a good question on the impact of temperature on wild yeast, but I would say that the same temperature rules apply to wild yeast as to commercial yeast. So, you most likely wouldn't tempt fate by using excessively high water temperatures. As a practical matter, the question may be moot when you consider that the internal temperature of a pizza as it bakes can get up to around 180 degrees F. See, for example, numbered page 16 of this document:

http://www.pfmills.com/filebin/pdf/technical_informational_booklet_v1-opt.pdf

Peter

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #345 on: August 09, 2014, 03:35:04 PM »
Thanks Peter, useful info.  In my currently cold climate I'm using the 90f water for mixing, and then if I have the time and the sun is shining I'll use direct sunlight to accelerate the dough fermentation a few hours ahead of bake time.  I suspect if I left the dough out for too long in direct sunlight it would go over 100f, so I've been rotating the dough boxes to keep them under about 90f.

The table in that PDF is very interesting, those activation/deactivation processes must run their course very quickly at neapolitan temps.

Offline Tampa

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #346 on: August 09, 2014, 05:16:18 PM »
FWIIW, warm water brings a container of dough or sourdough up to temperature faster than leaving it in the sun (even in FL).  It is like dropping into a hot tub vs dry sauna - water is quicker.

Back to the accolades.  It is quite an accomplishment to land three beauties in one bake.  Knowing you, I bet it was 3/3 as opposed to 3/10 (which is what I might share - but not admit it).  Are the undersides spot on as well?  I'm starting to think about resurrecting that Blackstone Challenge.

Dave

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #347 on: August 09, 2014, 05:39:09 PM »
I thought Scott already met the challenge.   ???

If not, don`t worry...I`m about to bust out with some moves here very shortly.  :chef:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline cervicornis

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #348 on: August 11, 2014, 01:36:31 AM »
Beautiful pies, Dylan.  FWIW, those photos inspire my attempts to improve by copying the aesthetics of others' work here.  I like how your pizzas have a sense of orderly chaos.  If you happen to get a chance, I'd love to see what your current skins look like, just before you launch them in the Blackstone.
It's evolution, baby

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #349 on: August 11, 2014, 02:58:50 AM »
Thanks!  There is a bit of chaos around here, and just enough order to get a pie topped and into the oven.  I'll snap some unbaked pie pics when the next bake comes around.


Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #350 on: August 17, 2014, 01:15:17 AM »
I'm not sure what came over me but this week I bought a bag of cheap pre-shredded LM mozz/cheddar blend.  I inflicted the cheese on a plain cheese and funghi pie, both with a little fresh garlic.   A good reminder for me that fresh buffalo mozz is not the only cheese to throw on a pizza.   The cheese charred quickly, a bit odd as you can see in the cheese pie, the but taste buds and wife didn't mind one bit.

250g 5Stagioni Pizzaria: 63%, 2.7%, 4%SD 24+20@59f-75f
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 01:20:02 AM by dylandylan »

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #351 on: August 17, 2014, 01:17:53 AM »
Cont'd.

Offline jvp123

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #352 on: August 17, 2014, 01:23:12 AM »
Hi Dylan,
Looking at Fung 5 (side angle) is that typical for an NP in terms of oven spring and airiness cooked on a Blackstone?
Jeff

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #353 on: August 17, 2014, 02:18:32 AM »
I'm not really sure Jeff, it's fairly typical of my pies these days - possibly a little more charred on the underside than some of my pies though.  I tend to go for a fairly thin centre and fairly 'sprung' cornicione, but that's more my stretching than the oven dictating the shape.  I would say the oven itself is certainly capable of producing very good spring in that it can transfer a lot of heat to the dough very quickly.

Offline fagilia

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #354 on: August 17, 2014, 03:04:33 AM »
Is this always the way you keep your balled dough?
Since they do not touch after 20h i assume they are pretty flat and have a relatively large dia.
when i have tried this compared to balls with side support it has resulted in less spring in cornice.
i do assume craig as an example has a higher z axis on his balls and omid as well.
that is my observation on my dough.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 03:08:06 AM by fagilia »

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #355 on: August 17, 2014, 03:24:55 AM »
Is this always the way you keep your balled dough?
Since they do not touch after 20h i assume they are pretty flat and have a relatively large dia.
when i have tried this compared to balls with side support it has resulted in less spring in cornice.
i do assume craig as an example has a higher z axis on his balls and omid as well.
that is my observation on my dough.


Usually if I'm just doing a few pies I'll do two to a container and let them spread out.  Interesting observation about less spring, they do tend to be fairly flat but are nicely aerated and soft.  You've got me thinking that I'll try some different ways of rising the balls and see what the results are.      Usually if I'm cooking for larger numbers I'll do 3 or 4 to a container out of necessity (pic in an earlier post - not great pies, but shows 4x balls to a container).
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 03:26:33 AM by dylandylan »

Offline fagilia

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #356 on: August 17, 2014, 03:57:22 AM »
Ok just an observation i had.
but nothing wrong with it i do like that some times to.
Da Micheles dough trays look the same and their cornice looks somewhat like yours and their repotation is not that bad :)
On the other hand ciro salvos trays are more stacked and his has more spring.


Offline Roman

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #357 on: August 17, 2014, 07:10:04 AM »
Dylan,

You're spinning some mean disks there. May I ask what the finished gram weight is of your individual  balled doughs are?

Thanks,
Roman

Offline vandev

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #358 on: August 17, 2014, 07:49:57 AM »
yum Dylan! they look awesome..  really good.. I like the taste of the classic cheese. I had the same problem with the shredded as well but tasted great. I did what Craig told me and cut slices of a small block about 1/16" and then cut them in like 3/4' squares. Worked very well for me. as this the 64%?  Ah...sorry just saw was 63%.. ;D awesome pies bro.... ;D As usual....
« Last Edit: August 17, 2014, 07:55:19 AM by vandev »

Offline norma427

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #359 on: August 17, 2014, 09:29:06 AM »
Dylan,

Awesome pies!

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!