Author Topic: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?  (Read 806 times)

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Offline mkevenson

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Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« on: November 24, 2013, 11:49:19 AM »
I have been exploring this thread : http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26831.20.html


In this thread are many pics of dough in various stages of fermentation. I am having a hard time knowing why one pic looks like the dough is ready to bake, and another pic where the dough is not ready.
Was just wondering if there is a pictorial thread that gives an explanation of why one pic of dough looks ready to bake and another shows the dough is not ready.


Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2013, 01:04:16 PM »
I know it's not exactly what you are looking for, but I'd be curious to see pictures of everyone's dough at the point that they consider it to be ready.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2013, 03:53:23 PM »
This was from my last bake, 12hr room temp. ferment. Usually don't get this much gluten development though, I stopped doing cold ferments and started doing a series of slap and folds so that might be why.
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Offline mkevenson

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Re: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2013, 08:43:09 PM »
Chasenpse, what is it in your pic that tells you about gluten developement? The answer to this question will help me understand what you and others are seeing.

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2013, 10:41:59 AM »
This is just my theory and I don't have any real evidence to back it up but I believe a dough is ready for use when you can visibly see a substantial amount of bubbles and a network created by the yeast/CO2 on the bottom and sides of a container. The finer and more pronounced the better I feel the dough is. Of course this is only applies to dough risen in clear containers, for dough left to rise in a tray or bowl I think it's more just trial and error of getting to know how your dough rises and recognizing when it's close to or just passing it's peak. If you keep a close eye on your dough keep time when it looks like it's gotten a good rise (I've read a lot of recipes that say when it doubles in size but that's not always true) and look for when it starts to collapse or get smaller, that should be a good start. I feel once it's passed it's peak the crumb will only get tighter from there on, which personally I find undesirable.

These are two doughs from an experiment, the first was refrigerated immediately after balling, the second I mixed and then did a series of rests/slap & folds before refrigerating. They both sat in the fridge for the same amount of time but the second had more development compared to the first because of the slap & folds. I'm sure if I had let the first ferment for longer (possibly as room temp) it would eventually resemble something like the second.
If Tetris has taught me anything, itís that errors pile up and accomplishments disappear.

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2013, 11:15:00 AM »
Chasenpse, thanks. I do see a difference both in the size of the holes and the fine striations especially in the mid portion . Interesting!

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline Needssalt

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Re: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2013, 02:21:23 PM »
I use the clear containers also.  In my kitchen, there has definitely been a range for "ready to bake".  I'm usually somewhere around the second/third pic in this thread, as far as activity appears before baking.  As the years go by, (and now it's more interesting to compare with Craig's yeast prediction table) I can flip a container, see the activity, and mostly know what to expect.  I can stack the containers, rearrange closer to the oven if needed, etc..  If I'm cooking throughout an evening, there's always "extra" dough, and by the end of the night, sometimes a 300g dough ball pops the top off a container, and the bottom of the ball looks blown (kind of like the first pic in this thread),  I'll bake anyways for lunch the next day, and usually I'm pleasantly surprised how it bakes up. 

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Picture guide to dough ready to bake?
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2013, 02:58:36 PM »
I fermented my dough in a dry cooler for 38 hrs. Temps ranged from 61F to 64F as measured by a Maverick ET 732 Redi Check therm. Used Craigs yeast chart which resulted in 0.08g of IDY.


New to me was a "poolish" mixed 90 g of recipe flour with 90 g of water and 2/3 the yeast. Let sit at room temp for 3 hrs before mixing with the remaining flour and water and salt and oil.


flour 231g (60 % 00 Caputo Pizzeria, 40 % KABF)
145.9 g water (63%)
idy 0.034 %
kosher salt 2 %
EVOO 3.47 g (1.5%)
bowl residue 1.5 %


here are the pics:
1 & 2 12 hr
3 &4 24 hr
5 &6 36 hr
7 & 8 38 hr.
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles