Author Topic: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?  (Read 727 times)

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Offline Prefessa

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Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« on: November 24, 2013, 03:26:41 PM »
Guys: I have been to 3 of em...original new haven, Fairfield and Danbury....

The one thing I cannot figure is that there is a buttery note that is unique to their pies. I first thought it was the Grande Mozz they use....but I have had a the clam pie No Mozz and the buttery flavor is still there...which leads me to 2 possibilities....

Either the note is coming from the grated cheese they use......

or

Its Possible that the dough has butter in the recipe...

Any thoughts?? I know a lot of you guys have studied what these masters do to turn out great product.


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2013, 04:08:41 PM »
If you use butter as a dough ingredient, I'd think you'd have to use a whole bunch of it to be able to taste it. Probably at least 10%. I really doubt Pepe's does that, for a whole bunch of reasons, including: 1) It would probably lead to excessively burned crust; 2) The crust would have a different texture than Pepe's crust; 3) Butter is too expensive to use in dough, in most circumstances; 4) Using butter as a dough ingredient complicates things.

Offline Prefessa

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2013, 05:33:40 PM »
Great points. So now there are two options again there brand of grated cheese . Or now I wonder if they are using a preferment that makes alot of diacetyl? It des to be Congo from the toppings not the crust. It's likely very simple it a blend of domestic cheeses that give that note. Maybe domestic Romano or some other commercial enzyme treated cheese .

scott123

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2013, 10:14:46 PM »
I didn't get much of a diacetyl note when I tasted it a few months back. 

On your next trip, you might want to taste the crust separate from the toppings. That might help narrow it down.

In certain circles, I've seen the concept of 'wok hei' incorporate more than just the intense heat of the burner. Some people ascribe something intangible, almost mystical to a heavily used wok.  I only subscribe to the high heat definition. When it comes to coal ovens, though, there's definitely an intangible involved.  Perhaps it's the sootiness of the poorly cleaned decks. Maybe some component coming off the burning coal is making it's way into the crust, I'm not sure. But the buttery note might be coming from the oven.

My next theory is olive oil.  All non motz pies get olive oil, so perhaps they're using an extra buttery tasting brand of olive oil.

My last theory isn't so much as a theory but an observation about Romano.  Pizza obsessives tend to go to high end markets (like Trader Joes) and buy top shelf romano.  Non obsessives tend to gravitate towards Kraft. Pizzerias on the other hand, tend to use neither.  There's a middle ground that isn't expensive, but doesn't taste like sawdust.  This middle ground romano is way less complex/sheep-y than the top shelf stuff.

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2013, 10:29:59 PM »
Scott,

What brands of Pecorino Romano do you consider to be top shelf?

Mary Ann
Mary Ann

scott123

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2013, 10:36:03 PM »
Mary Ann, I'm not up on all the romano brands, but Locatelli is one of the ones that comes to mind.  Really, any romano sold in a chunk would probably be too high end.  I haven't done a huge amount of research but I'd bet any amount of money that Restaurant Depot has a bag of romano that's less flavorful than a chunk of Trader Joes, but that's more flavorful than Kraft. I'm certain that's what many pizzerias are using.

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2013, 10:37:59 PM »
Ok, good.  I always use Locatelli and always grate it  ;D
Mary Ann

scott123

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2013, 10:45:15 PM »
Ok, good.  I always use Locatelli and always grate it  ;D

As you know, I'm very pro-grating, but, in this instance, I think there's an advantage to pre-grated romano.  It's mellowier, which, in turn, allows pizzerias to use a lot more of it. If you take Locatelli and use a bit too much, which, imo, is incredibly easy to do, the romano completely overtakes the pizza.  The cheaper (but not cheapest) stuff allows you to toss on the romano a lot more haphazardly.  You can drive up the saltiness a bit, but the romano never completely takes over.

High end romano, imo, has too much intensity for pizza.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2013, 10:51:39 PM by scott123 »

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2013, 10:56:24 PM »
Forgot to mention that I only use it on pasta
Mary Ann

scott123

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2013, 11:00:30 PM »
Forgot to mention that I only use it on pasta

You should try romano on pizza.  I tend to prefer it with a less complex sauce (tomatoes, salt, sugar), but it's good on all pizzas.  It's imo, a big part of that classic old school pizza parlour-y taste.


Offline Jackitup

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Re: Frank Pepes....Buttery Note?
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2013, 06:31:25 AM »
Actually I have been getting the Supremo Italiano RD's house brand of Parmesan and find it 'not too bad'. It has a bit of a nutty/buttery finish, but would like a bit more funkiness to it. For the price, well worth trying. It comes in about a 6 pound chunk that is pre-segmented into about 30 smaller pieces (guessing) all stuck together as a chunk, I separate them and vacuum pack a couple per pack and grate as I use with a microplane grater. About 4-5 bucks a pound, and like I said, well worth trying

jon
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