Author Topic: Making bread in the Blackstone  (Read 1403 times)

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Offline barryvabeach

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Making bread in the Blackstone
« on: December 02, 2013, 09:36:19 PM »
I think Coon asked you can make bread in the Blackstone oven.  The answer, is with a little work you can, but I would not suggest it.

  I was pretty sure it wouldn't work, but I was making a few loaves this weekend and decided to try.  I was concerned that if I made a long baguette - say 15 inches or so, the outer ends could end up browned well before the middle of the loaf.  With pizza, we have mostly cheese in the middle, so the differential heating is not as much a problem, but with baking, if you bake at too high a temp, the exterior would be burned before the interior cooked .  I decided that to avoid this problem by making a torpedo shaped loaf - which is about 12 inches long.  Second, I was worried about getting the overall air temp right.  That turned out to be a pain.  I set it for the lowest temp on the front knob and let it preheat for about 10 minutes.  I then used a probe thermometer to measure the air temp in the middle of the oven and it was over 600F, way too hot.  I turned the pressure regulator closed a turn, checked and again, and kept repeating that for I don't remember how many turns, and finally got it in the neighborhood of 450 F.  By that time the stone temp, measured by an IR thermometer was under 400F, but not much I could do about it.  I loaded the loaf,  and checked on it a few times, and it eventually came out more even colored than I would have guessed.  The taste was nothing spectacular, and it didn't get as much oven spring as in an oven with moisture added, so I would not suggest doing it.  It would not have any of the smoke flavor of a wood fired oven, or even a BGE or BSK, so I don't see any advantage.   


Offline norma427

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2013, 06:39:30 AM »
Barry,

Nice try with bread in the BS.  8)

I would like to ask you what temperature it was outside when you baked your bread.  I have not used my Blackstone unit since it  is colder outside.  I did fire it up to see if the colder temperatures and maybe wind might not give an even bake.  I did not fire it up full blast but wanted to see if I could keep about the same temperature on the bottom stone.  My stone varied more in temperature than when it was warmer.  I don't know if the stone temperature would change as much if it was going full blast.  Since it seems like a lot of heat comes out the front of my BS I was thinking if maybe a baked might not go right in lower temperatures and wind. 

Norma
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Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2013, 07:28:40 AM »
Norma, it was pretty cold - I would say low 40's and fairly windy.  I made several pizzas later that night when the temps had dropped a bunch, and they came out great.  I load a pie, go back in the house and come out 90 seconds later and check on it - and it is usually done within less than another minute, so I don't spend much time out in the cold. You are  right that with the burner at medium or full, the outside temp has little to no impact.  What was surprising to me was how many turns I had to give to the regulator to get the air temp in the middle of the oven to around 400, and how puny the flame looked at that setting - compared to the roar when I use it for pizza.

Offline Tampa

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2013, 07:53:09 AM »
Great post Barry.  Thanks for sharing.

I haven't done a lot of bread baking but a few years ago I tried the no knead method in a Dutch Oven.  The result was quite tasty.  I'm guessing one could throw a Dutch Oven in the Blackstone, but it just seems easier to use the indoor oven.
Dave

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2013, 08:54:18 AM »
Great post Barry.  Thanks for sharing.

I haven't done a lot of bread baking but a few years ago I tried the no knead method in a Dutch Oven.  The result was quite tasty.  I'm guessing one could throw a Dutch Oven in the Blackstone, but it just seems easier to use the indoor oven.
Dave

Where does one find a Dutch oven that would fit in a Blackstone?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2013, 09:31:46 AM »
Where does one find a Dutch oven that would fit in a Blackstone?

The Netherlands? :-D

John K
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Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2013, 09:23:01 PM »
Txcraig,  they make dutch ovens in many sizes.  I
I have a two quart one that would fit,  I got it used on eBay.  With pizza, we are often searching for a balance between top heat and bottom heat.  In bread, we are often trying to keep it most during the initial part of the cook, and a DO can help.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2013, 09:33:38 PM »
Txcraig,  they make dutch ovens in many sizes.  I
I have a two quart one that would fit,  I got it used on eBay.  With pizza, we are often searching for a balance between top heat and bottom heat.  In bread, we are often trying to keep it most during the initial part of the cook, and a DO can help.

I've baked bread in a Dutch oven and am completely familiar with the concept. I simply didn't realize they made Dutch ovens that small.

I'm guessing that the 2qt won't fit with the lid on? Rather, upside down covering the a loaf on the stone? If so, please take a video of that maneuver if you ever try it.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Coon88

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2013, 09:43:17 PM »
I think Coon asked you can make bread in the Blackstone oven.  The answer, is with a little work you can, but I would not suggest it.
.

Thanks for the feedback and trying a little experiment for a bs question.


Coon

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2013, 05:46:06 PM »
I bought a stainless steel salad bowl from a restaurant supply that is about a perfect fit to rest on the stone of the BS.  I'm not sure if it will fit under the top stone nor how you'd load/unload the bread. I bought it for covering bread in my kitchen oven when baking on a 16" stone.  I paid like $12 for the bowl.  My wife has come up with a few different uses for it already.  I came home one night to see her using it loaded with ice water and cooling some chocolate in a pan.   


Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2013, 09:18:17 PM »
Bbbqchuck, if you wanted to use it, I would spray the bowl with a nonstick spray, then let the dough do its final rise, and put the bowl in the BS when the final rise is done.  A number of people have run tests of a preheated dutch oven v room temp dutch oven and found virtually no difference.

Offline GJranch

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Re: Making bread in the Blackstone
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2014, 10:30:44 AM »
I have made focaccia bread in my Blackstone . .  Used the America's Test Kitchen recipe (no kneading) and baked in cake pans.  Set the oven at the lowest flame, which showed about 375 on the temp gauge, and baked for about 12-14 minutes.  The first loaf was a bit too brown on bottom (see pic) but think that was because I started the bread at higher temp. Second loaf took a couple minutes longer and was great.  Love to be able to cook other things in this pizza oven - especially when I don't want to heat up kitchen. 


 

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