Author Topic: Why can't I use quick-rise yeast?  (Read 3458 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline UGAChemDawg

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 24
  • I Love Pizza!
Why can't I use quick-rise yeast?
« on: March 16, 2006, 03:28:49 PM »
Why can't I use quick-rise yeast instead of the kind that takes all day?


Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21721
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Why can't I use quick-rise yeast?
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2006, 04:38:33 PM »
UGAChemDawg,

I'm not sure whether you are referring to something like Fleishchmann's Rapid-Rise yeast or Red Star's equivalent Quick Rise yeast or to what we usually call instant dry yeast on this forum. The "fast rise" yeasts are usually intended for short-term quick rise applications (e.g., an hour or so) as used by home users, not professionals. They are not identical to the instant dry yeasts but they should still work in applications calling for instant dry yeast.

If you are trying to draw a distinction between active dry yeast and instant dry yeast, I see no reason why you can't substitute the instant dry yeast for the active dry yeast. In fact, it is a good substitution because you don't have to rehydrate it in water before using. It can go directly in with the flour. You will need a little bit less of the instant dry yeast than active dry yeast to get equivalent performance, but that is about it. But don't look for identical results from using a fast-rise or instant dry yeast over a few hours as compared with a yeast that works all day.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 16, 2006, 04:44:42 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline UGAChemDawg

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 24
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Why can't I use quick-rise yeast?
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2006, 04:43:37 PM »
UGAChemDawg,

I'm not sure whether you are referring to something like Fleishchmann's Rapid-Rise yeast or Red Star's equivalent Quick Rise yeast or to what we usually call instant dry yeast on this forum. The "fast rise" yeasts are usually intended for short-term quick rise applications (e.g., an hour or so) as used by home users, not professionals. They are not identical to the instant dry yeasts but they should still work in applications calling for instant dry yeast.

If you are trying to draw a distinction between active dry yeast and instant dry yeast, I see no reason why you can't substitute the instant dry yeast for the active dry yeast. In fact, it is a good substitution because you don't have to rehydrate it in water before using. It can go directly in with the flour. You will need a little bit less of the instant dry yeast than active dry yeast to get equivalent performance, but that is about it.

Peter

In the initial recipe I used active dry yeast but accidentally killed it because the water was too hot. So I got some Fleishmann's Rapid-Rise yeast (It says on the jar "Bread machine yeast" but that it can also be used for any application calling for the Rapid Rise yeast). I made the dough using the exact same recipe except with the quick yeast, which will sit 2.5-3 hours instead of 8. I have to have the pizza made by 9 tonight.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21721
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Why can't I use quick-rise yeast?
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2006, 04:55:08 PM »
UGAChemDawg,

I was modifying my last post as you were posting. But if you read the last sentence I added, you will see the point I was trying to make. What you are doing is essentially what professionals do when they run out of their regular dough. They speed up the process (usually by doubling or tripling the amount of yeast and using warm water) so that everything happens within a few hours (sometimes as few as 1 to 2 hours) rather than several hours or even overnight. If you used the same amount of Fleishchmann's Rapid-Rise yeast as you did the active dry yeast, you will indeed get a much faster rise. Only you can judge whether the results are acceptable.

Peter

Offline UGAChemDawg

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 24
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Why can't I use quick-rise yeast?
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2006, 05:52:36 PM »
UGAChemDawg,

I was modifying my last post as you were posting. But if you read the last sentence I added, you will see the point I was trying to make. What you are doing is essentially what professionals do when they run out of their regular dough. They speed up the process (usually by doubling or tripling the amount of yeast and using warm water) so that everything happens within a few hours (sometimes as few as 1 to 2 hours) rather than several hours or even overnight. If you used the same amount of Fleishchmann's Rapid-Rise yeast as you did the active dry yeast, you will indeed get a much faster rise. Only you can judge whether the results are acceptable.

Peter

I used the same amount of rapid-rise as I normally use active dry yeast, and put it in the oven set to "proof mode" which basically just lets the dough rise in a warm environment that isn't hot enough to cook it (it holds the temperature at 100 degrees F even). After a little over an hour so far, the dough is huge. I proofed the yeast with warm water like you do for active dry yeast, even though it apparently isn't necessary for the rapid rise yeast. I'm going to let it sit about 2 hours and then decorate it.

Offline kcbbq83

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10
  • Age: 49
  • Location: Kansas City area
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Why can't I use quick-rise yeast?
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2006, 08:55:32 AM »
for those whose oven's don't have a "proof" setting, room temp rise can be helped along a bit by placing dough in the oven with the light on. Provides a few degrees over room temp and a draft free environment.