Author Topic: Dough Calculator?  (Read 859 times)

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Offline Auralnauts

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Dough Calculator?
« on: December 08, 2013, 01:01:23 PM »
Howdy, I need some help with the Lehmann Pizza Dough Calculator. I need to figure out how to input the information I want to determine ingredients for different amount of dough balls.

Currently, my simple dough recipe is:
7.5 liters of water
10 oz of cake yeast per 25 lbs of white flour
5 oz of salt, 5 oz of sugar
25 lbs of flour
2 tsp of oil.

How can I input this information in the calculator? It asks for percentages, which I do not know about.
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2013, 03:07:08 PM »
Auralnauts,

I assume that all of the ingredients given by ounces are by weight. Is that correct?

As for the oil, what type are you using?

And is there a particular dough ball weight that you use and, if so, what is the corresponding pizza size?

Peter

Offline Auralnauts

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2013, 03:13:35 PM »
Auralnauts,

I assume that all of the ingredients given by ounces are by weight. Is that correct?

As for the oil, what type are you using?

And is there a particular dough ball weight that you use and, if so, what is the corresponding pizza size?

Peter

Weight in ounces, yes. I use regular vegetable oil, and the weight of a dough ball is 1 lb 15 oz made for a 16" pie.
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2013, 04:02:35 PM »
Auralnauts,

I converted all of the ingredients not recited by weight to ounces and calculated the baker's percents. The flour is always recited as 100%, no matter what the flour is, and all of the other weights are with respect to the flour. So, the overall recipe in baker's percent form is as follows:

White Flour (100%):
Water (66.1355%):
CY (2.5%):
Salt (1.25%):
Vegetable Oil (0.07936%):
Sugar (1.25%):
Total (171.21486%):
11340.05 g  |  400 oz | 25 lbs
7499.8 g  |  264.54 oz | 16.53 lbs
283.5 g | 10 oz | 0.63 lbs |
141.75 g | 5 oz | 0.31 lbs | 8.47 tbsp | 0.53 cups
9 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2 tsp | 0.67 tbsp
141.75 g | 5 oz | 0.31 lbs | 11.85 tbsp | 0.74 cups
19415.84 g | 684.86 oz | 42.8 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

For a single dough ball weighing 31 ounces, using the Dough Weight option of the Lehmann dough calculating tool, we get the following:

White Flour (100%):
Water (66.1355%):
CY (2.5%):
Salt (1.25%):
Oil (0.07936%):
Sugar (1.25%):
Total (171.21486%):
513.3 g  |  18.11 oz | 1.13 lbs
339.48 g  |  11.97 oz | 0.75 lbs
12.83 g | 0.45 oz | 0.03 lbs |
6.42 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.15 tsp | 0.38 tbsp
0.41 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.09 tsp | 0.03 tbsp
6.42 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.61 tsp | 0.54 tbsp
878.85 g | 31 oz | 1.94 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Dough (31 ounces) is for a single 16" pizza; corresponding thickness factor = 31/(3.14159 x 8 x 8) = 0.1541814; no bowl residue compensation

Using the above dough ball weight in the Lehmann dough calculating tool along with the specified baker's percents, you can specify any number of dough balls (up to 999) and the tool will give you the ingredient quantities for that number of dough balls. Also, if you use the the thickness factor calculated above along with the specified baker's percent in the Lehmann dough calculating tool (the Thickness Factor option), you can specify any desired number and size of pizza and the tool will give you the ingredient weights. With a little practice, I'm sure you will figure things out.

The thickness factor calculated above strikes me as being high. Is the 31-ounce dough ball weight correct, or are you making a thick crust?

Peter

 

Offline Auralnauts

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2013, 04:10:02 PM »
The thickness factor calculated above strikes me as being high. Is the 31-ounce dough ball weight correct, or are you making a thick crust?

Peter

Thanks a bunch Peter! It's a hand stretched pizza so I make the outer crust thick while the center stays thin. The crust in the center is thin but fairly chewey, I guess it's because it has a bit more dough. I will accept any suggestions if you have any. Anyway, thanks a lot!  :chef:
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2013, 04:55:37 PM »
Auralnauts,

I was curious about the small amount of vegetable oil. It is so low that I don't think you would miss it if it were omitted. When I think of oil, I usually think about 1-3% for a NY style and maybe 5% or more for an American style (think Papa John's). Chicago deep-dish and thin style pizzas can use a great deal of oil but that is not what your dough recipe is for.

Unless Colombians prefer low salt for their pizzas, your salt also strikes me as being a bit on the low side. My standard amount is around 1.75% but many of our members use 2%.

Can you tell us what kind of flour you are using, including protein percent? A hydration value of around 66% is high for almost all flours in the U.S, including high-gluten flours. By any chance are you using a pan or screen or disk for your pizzas?

Peter



Offline Auralnauts

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2013, 09:36:03 PM »
Auralnauts,

I was curious about the small amount of vegetable oil. It is so low that I don't think you would miss it if it were omitted. When I think of oil, I usually think about 1-3% for a NY style and maybe 5% or more for an American style (think Papa John's). Chicago deep-dish and thin style pizzas can use a great deal of oil but that is not what your dough recipe is for.

Unless Colombians prefer low salt for their pizzas, your salt also strikes me as being a bit on the low side. My standard amount is around 1.75% but many of our members use 2%.

Can you tell us what kind of flour you are using, including protein percent? A hydration value of around 66% is high for almost all flours in the U.S, including high-gluten flours. By any chance are you using a pan or screen or disk for your pizzas?

Peter

Interesting, I don't use pans, screens, or disks. I use a high gluten flour but I currently don't know the info on it. Is there a thread that maybe has the percentages of a good style of dough? I've been alright with this dough recipe but I see now that it could be better.
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2013, 10:25:24 AM »
Interesting, I don't use pans, screens, or disks. I use a high gluten flour but I currently don't know the info on it. Is there a thread that maybe has the percentages of a good style of dough? I've been alright with this dough recipe but I see now that it could be better.
Auralnauts,

In my last post, I neglected to mention that if you decide to increase the amount of oil, you should consider reducing the hydration value by the same percent because oil also has a "wetting" effect on the dough and could make the dough harder to work with. I thought that you might be using a pan or other carrier because of the high hydration dough you are using and a propensity for the skins to stick to a peel, which is usually not a problem if you are using a pan or the like. You didn't indicate how much bench flour you are using but if it is plentiful that can reduce the overall hydration of the dough and allow you to use a peel safely and avoid sticking or loading problems.

As for a dough recipe with baker's percents that you might consider, it all depends on the type of pizza you would like to make. If there is a particular type of pizza you have in mind, either for personal or professional use, maybe I or one of our other members can suggest something. However, I might add that from time to time I get PMs from members who are professional or would-be professional pizza makers in Central and South America and invariably their PMs are about my clones of the Papa John's dough and pizza. This has made me wonder what the appeal is of a Papa John's type of pizza in those countries, especially since PJ does not have a presence in those countries to familiarize people with that style.

Peter

Offline Auralnauts

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Re: Dough Calculator?
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2013, 09:47:06 PM »
Auralnauts,

In my last post, I neglected to mention that if you decide to increase the amount of oil, you should consider reducing the hydration value by the same percent because oil also has a "wetting" effect on the dough and could make the dough harder to work with. I thought that you might be using a pan or other carrier because of the high hydration dough you are using and a propensity for the skins to stick to a peel, which is usually not a problem if you are using a pan or the like. You didn't indicate how much bench flour you are using but if it is plentiful that can reduce the overall hydration of the dough and allow you to use a peel safely and avoid sticking or loading problems.

As for a dough recipe with baker's percents that you might consider, it all depends on the type of pizza you would like to make. If there is a particular type of pizza you have in mind, either for personal or professional use, maybe I or one of our other members can suggest something. However, I might add that from time to time I get PMs from members who are professional or would-be professional pizza makers in Central and South America and invariably their PMs are about my clones of the Papa John's dough and pizza. This has made me wonder what the appeal is of a Papa John's type of pizza in those countries, especially since PJ does not have a presence in those countries to familiarize people with that style.

Peter

Most likely it has to do with the freshness of the taste; in my opinion, it's terrible pizza. Then again, South America hasn't really been introduced to Italian style cuisine so...

King Arthur Bread Flour (100%):
Water (room temp) (61%):
IDY (.5%):
Salt (1.75%):
Soybean Oil (3%):
Sugar (1%):
Total (167.25%):

123 pizza recipe looks interesting and simple, though I don't think there is King Arthur flour in Colombia...
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.


 

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