Author Topic: A swedish crust  (Read 6920 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #120 on: August 30, 2014, 04:47:01 PM »
Ahh ok. No my belief is that they do bulk fermentation until the morning. And then ball for service the same day. Dont know exact what times though. Also i dont know how long bulk ferment is but they told me total fermentation was at least 24hours. This is my belief i have not seen it beeing practised. They make all dough in one place so probably some guys make dough all day long.


Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #121 on: October 06, 2014, 03:09:41 AM »
Just wanted to ahow the best time i have made to date. Around 70 percent water. No leoaparding. Bad cheese melt. Too little tomatoe but still the best pie.
the crust was extremely soft but still robust enough to puff up extremely with perfect spiderweb inside crust even where puff was at maximum.
Recently i have found out the looks might not be that important after all.

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #122 on: October 06, 2014, 03:11:41 AM »
This is what happens to a forgotten pie in 3 minutes in my oven :)
Pretty cool looking

Offline stonecutter

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 798
  • Location: SC
    • Old World Stone & Garden
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #123 on: October 06, 2014, 07:42:53 AM »
Nice work with your first pizza!   70% huh?  Did you go with 24 hour bulk?  The burnt one looks like a lava field!
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/


When we build, let us think that we build for ever.
John Ruskin

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #124 on: October 06, 2014, 11:17:58 AM »
No around 16h bulk 8h ball.
yes i know just like vulcano

Offline dylandylan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 781
  • Location: Dunedin, New Zealand
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #125 on: October 07, 2014, 03:28:33 AM »
Recently i have found out the looks might not be that important after all.

Totally agree! 

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #126 on: October 07, 2014, 10:47:06 AM »
Just wanted to ahow the best time i have made to date. Around 70 percent water. No leoaparding. Bad cheese melt. Too little tomatoe but still the best pie.
the crust was extremely soft but still robust enough to puff up extremely with perfect spiderweb inside crust even where puff was at maximum.
Recently i have found out the looks might not be that important after all.

Totally agree!

I agree to the extent that you mean pronounced leoparding doesn't mean that the pizza will be great or that great pizza must have pronounced leoparding. To that end, I think it would be more accurate to say that a specific look might not be that important. Norma pointed it out here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26843.0

To say that looks are not important as a blanket statement, I think would be wrong however. We eat first with our eyes. What we see affects our perception of the taste. Looks do matter. They are a part of the entire sensory package. AOTBE, the best looking pizza is the best pizza. Of course, what great looks like is subjective, so it's hard to move this beyond an intellectual exercise. Notwithstanding, there are some commonalities. For example, your pizza in Reply 121 above, despite the cheese and sauce shortcomings you mentioned, has certain attributes that I associate with great pizza such as the distinct, abrupt transition where the cornicione and the center meet, the dimple at 9:00 where something depressed the crust and it didn't spring back, and beautiful even coloration. It has that tender look. I would also disagree that the pie has "no leoparding." There is enough to give it character.

To me, the goal is to figure out how to make your own great pizza and then do it consistently. The look of your pizza then becomes one of the looks of great pizza. Many, if not most of the pizzerias commonly associated with great pizza, have a distinct/signature look.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #127 on: October 07, 2014, 02:29:10 PM »
Ahh Craig i must admit it. You are really great for this forum. Its impressive how you put in the time and effort to answere and put in argument.
What you wrote above is pinpointing what i did mean to a large extent. My perception of great looking pizza is changing over time. But also a year ago i was only focusing on looks and off course in this forum it is natural since we cant taste here. Nowdays i have become more of a taster and in the end probably i find my balance.
Offcourse looks are important but not as important in relation to taste as i used to think.
but thanks againand keep up the good work you are doing here.

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #128 on: November 03, 2014, 06:55:04 AM »
Ok here is a take on using some chredded smoked mozzarella on my diavola with calabrian salami.

I have been experiencing extreme puff in crust lately. Maby due to handmixed 69 percent dough. I dont know but i love it. its so light to eat. Big piece reduces to very small and tender piece in the mouth. So big stuff feels so small and light in the stomache.
My peel is 32.5 cm wide and my dough balls are appr 260 grams so you can get reference.
In start of the bake i see all leopardings but as it never seem to stop to puff most leoparding seem to blend in in the end.

 

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #129 on: November 03, 2014, 08:30:50 AM »
I really like the look of that crust.
Pizza is not bread.


Offline mjoaobompastor

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 33
  • Location: Vila do conde Portugal
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #130 on: November 04, 2014, 05:51:11 PM »
This crust seems the best you ever made...really cool!!can you specify de recipe?
What levitation method are you using?

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #131 on: November 05, 2014, 02:09:15 AM »
Thank you Craig and mjaobompastor.
My theory of the dough is that every detail matters for the end product. From mixing to how you open the disk.
For example in this case i used around 70% hydration. With total ferment of 28h. 20 bulk and 8h ball. I used wood dough box. Here is the problem. If you do not use the exact same wood on the floor the result will be totally different. The more moist the bottom will suck water the less relaxed the doughball will ve. as the dough ball raises more on an z axis than an x.y axis it will be harder to open = tougher crust and less leoparding to my experience.
I really would like to write the whole process but i am not like craig. I change every time i make dough.
i am just saying this so if anyone gets a different result its because of large amount of variables.
this my little dough theory... :)

Offline mjoaobompastor

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 33
  • Location: Vila do conde Portugal
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #132 on: November 06, 2014, 07:29:37 AM »
fagilia, yesterday i made pizza dough with no total dough fermentation...
i finished the mixing, let it rest8total dough) for a few minuts and i went on balls and made the total fermentation(16hours) on balls...its incredible how relaxed were the balls....so easy to stretch and open....it was really amazing and the cornicione was really light and bubly....
so i guess this can make a diference....try your self...
and tellme something!!!

Offline vandev

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 393
  • Location: florida
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #133 on: November 06, 2014, 08:28:10 AM »
Totally agree!

I second it.. ;D Crust does look delicious .. :drool:

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #134 on: November 07, 2014, 07:19:37 AM »
Yes i have tried with almost no bulk and all ball. I think you can do like this but you have to change other things to get the perfect dough in my opinion. I think omid has written some good stuff about a correct streanght of dough. This is different to everybody though. Some like this type of dough some like that.
if i took my procedure now and changed to no bulk my dough would be too realxed for my personal taste.
In breadmaking 2 steps are in general used to streanghten elasticity of gluten strings (my mother sais this :). But then again. How elastic gluten strings you want is totally a personal matter.

Offline mjoaobompastor

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 33
  • Location: Vila do conde Portugal
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #135 on: November 07, 2014, 09:42:21 AM »
and wich are those 2 steps that you talk about??

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #136 on: November 07, 2014, 03:32:53 PM »
First bulk and then make the bread or ball.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13235
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #137 on: November 08, 2014, 09:37:02 AM »
My theory of the dough is that every detail matters for the end product.

I agree completely. Great pizza happens at the margins. It's the sum of hitting all the little details some of which individually may not seem all that important to the more casual observer.

Pizza is not bread.

Offline fagilia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 353
Re: A swedish crust
« Reply #138 on: November 09, 2014, 08:03:23 AM »
Yes it is almost strange.
the other day i did dough and used two woodboxes exactly the same but one of the boxes were more saturated with parafinoil than the other. The difference in finished pizza was very big. Very big.