Author Topic: Special technique for this pizza crust?  (Read 3475 times)

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Offline tourmaline

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Special technique for this pizza crust?
« on: January 08, 2014, 03:14:43 AM »
Hello,
As some of you may know, I have been trying to clone my favorite pizzeria pizza. My focus is primarily on their sauce and cheese but I do also notice that they have an unusual, layered crust. The crust is quite thin, it's docked...but it has this very conspicuous layered effect. Here are the pictures - can anyone tell me how they achieve and maintain these  defined layers in their cooked crust?  ???


Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2014, 04:32:38 PM »
that's called a laminated dough, similar to what a baker would use to make croissants. True laminated doughs are usually layered with butter, this may or may not be the case with this pizza dough, could possible be layers of dough that got a brushing of olive oil. Do a google search of laminated doughs and ou should be able to find some You tube videos of the technique.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2014, 04:59:57 PM »
Hello,
As some of you may know, I have been trying to clone my favorite pizzeria pizza. My focus is primarily on their sauce and cheese but I do also notice that they have an unusual, layered crust. The crust is quite thin, it's docked...but it has this very conspicuous layered effect. Here are the pictures - can anyone tell me how they achieve and maintain these  defined layers in their cooked crust?  ???
I know of a couple guys here that would like to know how they did that.  ;D

What is the name of that pizzeria  tourmaline?
Thanks.

Bob
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Offline tourmaline

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2014, 02:12:30 AM »
DM Cavanagh, thank you very much!
I wonder why they go to all the trouble of making their dough layered/laminated like that...

Chicago Bob: Sorry, but I never reveal the name/location of this pizzeria on this forum. The reason is because I know this forum's posts show up in Google searches, and I don't want the owner to find the name of his pizzeria on this forum and see that someone is trying to copy their pizza. They're already paranoid enough as it is!

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2014, 11:01:04 PM »
That crust appears to be around 1/4" thick to me. Am I close? I'd say the dough is not as stiff as most laminated doughs (like Shakey's and Tommy's), but probably stiffer than Round Table.

A "true laminated dough" does not require butter or any other kind of fat. The only thing that makes a laminated dough a "true laminated dough" is lamination. Croissants are croissants and pizza is pizza. They are not the same thing, and it's very impractical for a pizzeria to use croissant-making techniques when making pizza. Croissants and laminated pizza crusts may have a couple common characteristics, but that's about all they have in common. And if this pizzeria is trying to make croissant pizza, they're not gonna be in business for very long because it's too labor-intensive for pizza. There's a good reason why it's hard to find laminated pizzas nowadays. It's because laminated pizza is already very labor-intensive without using croissant-making techniques.

With pizza, if there is anything between the layers of lamination, it's flour. It could be a little flour or it could be a lot of flour. The stiffer the dough, the less bench flour between the layers. With the pictured pizza, I'm guessing it's more than a little bit of flour. This pizza doesn't appear to be very crispy. It appears to be a tad crispy on the very bottom, then progressively chewier as you work your way up, with a bit of a gummy layer at the top. Probably not unlike a soft pretzel in a lot of ways.

I've made the pizza in those pictures before, but with fewer layers and probably considerably thinner. With the thickness of my pizzas, if I had used the same quantity of layers as the pictured pizza, you'd only be able to notice two or three layers (out of 8 layers) because the layers would mostly be too thin to recognize as individual layers. You say this pizza is quite thin, but it sure doesn't look thin. (I'm not saying it looks thick, but it doesn't look like what I consider thin.)

I feel like this pizza was baked very shortly after being sheeted. Probably relatively low yeast and no sugar. I also feel like there is little or no fat. Looks like at least 8 layers, or maybe 10-ish. The dough is probably sheeted at the thinnest sheeter setting before being folded and sheeted again to it's final thickness, which is much thicker than the thinnest sheeter setting.

You're not gonna hurt anyone by revealing whose pizza this is. If you reveal the pizzeria, they will probably never even know about it. If they're so paranoid, you better name the place and let other members tell you whatever they can about it while this place is still in business because they won't be in business for long. By refusing to reveal whose pizza this is, all you're gonna do is alienate members and make them not want to help you. Why would anyone want to help you when you refuse to share important information that could help them help you?

Just look at how much I've revealed about Tommy's (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12446.0.html). I've been doing it for over three years now. Do you think Tommy's is after me for the things I've figured out about their pizza and shared on the internet? Do you think they'd recognize me as "Aimless Ryan" if I walked into the place? And do you think I care? Why should I? I figured out how to make a much better Tommy's style pizza than actual Tommy's pizza. But I can slack off and make a near perfect copy of Tommy's, too, whenever I want. And so can anyone else who reads what I have to say about Tommy's in the Tommy's thread. If briterian had been as secretive as you when he started that thread, that thread would be one post long and it would be buried several pages deep.

You need to show more pictures. These pictures help, but they're not enough. We need to see the bottom of the pizza and other shots I can't think of right now. We need to see something in the picture to give us a perspective of how thick it is. Like a quarter or something. We need to see your next pizza and the pizza after that, and so on, because I'm betting this place does not produce consistent results. Most laminated pizzerias produce inconsistent pizzas. It's a nature of the beast.

Here's a post with a picture I think resembles the pizza in your pics somewhat, but not perfectly (Reply #257): http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12446.msg209159.html#msg209159.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2014, 11:02:34 PM »
I'm already questioning what I said about little or no fat.

Offline tourmaline

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2014, 02:26:49 AM »
Hi Ryan,
Thank you for the informative response.
Yes, Iíd say the crust is about ľĒ thick generally. Itís definitely not a cracker-y crust like in your pics, but I described it as quite thin because compared to a thicker crust or Chicago style, it is thin. Ryan, what would be the benefit/advantage of creating a layered crust like this, as opposed to a regular crust?

In terms of consistency,  the only occasional inconsistency is how cooked/brown the pizza is. Usually the cheese remains white-ish and not browned and I love it like that, but occasionally they leave it in longer and it gets more cooked, which I don't care for as much.

Now, about alienating members by being secretiveÖ

1. The name/location of this pizza place really has no bearing on my question in this thread, which is how to make the style of crust in the pics.

2. Iím not paranoid about the owner coming after me or being mad at me, and Iím certainly not trying to be cryptic or mysterious on the forum.
Look, here's the thing: This is a small family-owned Italian restaurant with one location, not a chain. The owner has actually responded to a bad review in Google Reviews, so I know for a fact that he googles their restaurant and keeps up on whatís being said about them. If he found a thread where someone was reporting on how sheís been dumpster diving and going through their recycling bin, trying to get information on their Ďsecret ingredient,í he would double down and would STOP putting their cheese boxes out in the recycling bin and start hiding the packaging of their pizza ingredients from public view. How would that bode for me and my quest?  Not good...
Iíve emailed with this restaurant and quizzed them in person, and let me tell you, they are paranoid and suspicious about people seeking information about their pizzas.
So I feel like I have pretty good reason to not want to tell the name of this place...NOT cuz the ownerís going to put a hit out on me but because he will start hiding their packaging from me. Iíve even ordered one of those long grabber mechanisms to help me reach into the recycling bin better. (((blush)))

(And BTW, this place is not going out of business for being paranoid. They've been in business since the 60s, they have fed the Kennedys and many movie stars. They are a special place with amazing pizza, and they're here to stay.)

Anyway, I have a hunch that the special flavor MAY just come from using Grande Mozzarella. I bit the bullet and ordered a loaf of Grande from Vern's in Wisconsin and it's due to arrive tomorrow. I have some dough ready, I've got a bowl of pizza sauce from this pizzeria, so we'll see tomorrow evening if the Grande cheese gives this pizza that amazing flavor. If not, I'm out $50 and will try to sell the Grande on Craigslist.  :o
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 03:17:32 AM by tourmaline »

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2014, 11:49:43 AM »
Here's an idea: Maybe you can describe the place using misspelled words that detective-like members can add up and figure out but would never show up on a Google search, beginning with the cross streets and the initials of the place. Like phonetically or something. Instead of saying the city's name, say "It's in a city 5 miles directly southwest of [City Name]." Or, if you're in "Cow uh four nya," say "the state west of Nevada (or Arizona)" or something like that (like maybe "Cow uh four nya"). Cuz, y'know, I can find out a lot about a place by reading Yelp reviews and looking at Yelp customer pics (and stuff like that). (If you don't believe me, just look at the pizzas I've shared in the "Definitive Giordano's" thread in the Chicago boards. By the way, I've never had Giordano's. And no one else, either here or elsewhere on the internet, has shared a good, reliable blueprint for cloning Giordano's.)

You said there was a foodservice truck in the Google Maps pic of this place, right? If so, that's something we can look for without you having to give away any Google-able information.

Let me try doing this with a place I know of, whose owner is a member here.

There's a place in a California city maybe 10 miles south of downtown City of Angels (just south of the international airport), west of the 405. The city name begins with a word that's identical to the borough of NYC with all the skyscrapers (or the home city of Kansas State University), but it has another word added to the end of city name. The second word of the city's name is the word we use to describe a sandy area on the edge of an ocean. The first half of the one-word street name where this pizzeria is located is the same word as the specific flower a guy might give his girlfriend on Valentines Day (or the football stadium/bowl game in Pasadena). The second half of the street name is similar to "cranberry" but without "berry." This pizzeria is in a shopping center on the south side of that road, just east of the main north/south road beginning with "Sep" and ending with "veda." The pizzeria is directly adjacent to a high-end grocery store. This pizzeria sells both NY style and DD, but promotes their DD a lot more than their NY style. The first word in the pizzeria's name (of three words) is a word generally used to describe the North entity during the Civil War (or the opposite of "Confederacy"). This word begins with a "U" but is a lot like "onion." The next word is "Pizza." There's one more word after that.

OK, that should be more than enough information to help you figure out after only a few minutes' detective work what pizzeria I'm talking about (particularly if you're using Google Maps). And I guarantee you the owner will never see this post. If he does find it, I'd like him respond in a follow-up post on this thread to say he's seen this post.

Glad to hear you got some Grande from Vern's. I've ordered Grande from them many times over the years, but last time I looked at their web site, it appeared that they had totally changed their business model and no longer carried Grande. One cool thing about Vern's is that they tend to include a couple reusable icepack thingies in the shipping box if the cheese is shipped at a time when the weather is warm or if they're shipping to a place where the weather is always warm. Even including shipping costs, from what I remember, the price ends up being comparable to the price of crappy cheese you can get at your local grocery store.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2014, 12:12:49 PM »
Ryan, what would be the benefit/advantage of creating a layered crust like this, as opposed to a regular crust?

That's a tough one to describe? What is it that you like about this place's crust? Whatever your answer is to that question, such a characteristic can probably only be accomplished with a laminated crust. To me, part of the joy of laminated crust is the way each layer is a little different than every other layer. They tend to be crispy at the bottom, then a little less crispy with each layer as you go up. I think it comes out most in slightly softer doughs, like Round Table's dough, (compared to Shakey's and Tommy's, which are stiffer than Round Table).

There's a pizza joint near me that I realized about a year ago laminates their skins, producing a pizza that kinda resembles the one in your pics. Their pizza is softer than laminated crusts I'm used to, and I can't quite figure out how they might do it. (I haven't snooped. I've only ordered from this place like once in the last ten or more years.)

With the pizza you're trying to figure out, I wonder if maybe they use a lower-protein flour than Tommy's or Shakey's. Like lower protein than AP flour. Regardless, I doubt that they use anything stronger than AP.

Regarding fat in the dough. If there is fat in this place's dough, I suspect it could be shortening or some other kind of fat without much or any color. The pizza in your pics is very white, and that says something important. But I'm not sure exactly what yet.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2014, 12:41:31 PM »
1. The name/location of this pizza place really has no bearing on my question in this thread, which is how to make the style of crust in the pics.

Well that's easy. Their crust is clearly laminated. For you to do this, first you need to roll a skin as thin as possible. If it's a soft dough (as it appears to be), you then want to dust each side liberally with bench flour then fold it into at least 8 layers, then roll that to the thickness you want. After that, use a pan and a pizza wheel to trim it. It will probably shrink (and become thicker) after you trim it, so you may want to roll it some more after you've trimmed it. (I usually end up rolling my skins a couple inches larger than the target pizza size.)

I like to do this by rolling two separate thin layers of dough, then stacking them. After stacking, I fold in half one way, then fold in half the other way, which gives me 8 layers. But with all the layers in your pictured pizza, you might want to fold it into thirds each way. That will give you 18 layers, which I suspect is too many layers. So what you might have to do is fold in half one way but fold in thirds the other way, which makes things a little tricky because you'll probably end up with a rectangle instead of a square (which probably works great when you're making a long sheet of dough with a sheeter, which is almost certainly how your favorite pizza joint does it).

You need to start out with a lot more dough than the desired weight of your skin. Maybe as much as 50% more dough than your trimmed skin will weigh. The excess dough can be recycled if you'll be making more than one pizza. Scan through the Tommy's thread I linked to above. I now consider it mostly useless before about page 15, but there are a lot of pictures that may help you, even in those first 15 pages. Also, Round Table and Shakey's threads may be very helpful to you.

Warning: This will make you sweat and hurt.


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2014, 12:46:20 PM »
...so we'll see tomorrow evening if the Grande cheese gives this pizza that amazing flavor. If not, I'm out $50 and will try to sell the Grande on Craigslist.  :o

No, you want the Grande cheese. Don't even think about selling it or getting rid of it. Just enjoy it while you have it. And don't waste it.

Did you find Grande packaging in their cardboard dumpster?

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2014, 01:46:57 PM »


Glad to hear you got some Grande from Vern's. I've ordered Grande from them many times over the years, but last time I looked at their web site, it appeared that they had totally changed their business model and no longer carried Grande. One cool thing about Vern's is that they tend to include a couple reusable icepack thingies in the shipping box if the cheese is shipped at a time when the weather is warm or if they're shipping to a place where the weather is always warm. Even including shipping costs, from what I remember, the price ends up being comparable to the price of crappy cheese you can get at your local grocery store.
Ryan, I just checked and they still sell Grande....you have to enter it in their site search box.

For 1 five lb. bag delivered to NC comes to $8.27 a lb......I didn't bother trying to see how much poundage I'd need to get the price down.

Bob
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Offline tourmaline

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2014, 03:13:53 AM »
Ryan, thank you for the thoughtful answers to my post.  :)

I am not comfortable revealing many details of this place through riddles, but for fun Iíll give a couple hints:

Hint 1. If I have a map of the United States in my hand, and I turn the map 180 degrees to the side, the geographic  region  of this pizza restaurant would now be located in the SE quadrant of the map.
Hint 2. The restaurant is named after a person,  and this common name is also the name of a minor, secondary Disney character from the old Mickey/Minnie/Donald Duck/Pluto cartoons.

Thatís all. If you figure it out, great. But donít try to play guessing game because I refuse to confirm or deny! ;-)  Now I AM being cryptic & mysterious. lol   :P

No, I didnít find any Grande packaging in the bin.  I thought it was Grande because the amazing flavor of their pizza is a bit cheddary, to my palate, and I read a post from someone on the board saying Grande Mozz had a ďcheddaryĒ flavor. Also, Iíve been eating pizza from this restaurant since I was a child in the 1980s and itís always had the same distinctive, strong flavor, so I knew it had to be a cheese that had been around for many years. Grande has such a solid, entrenched reputation with pizzerias, I just got the idea in my head that it was probably Grande that they use. But itís not. And itís definitely not a prepackaged blend, because they brag on their menu about ďgrating our own cheese daily.Ē
What I know is: there is ZERO romano in it, although a cashier at the restaurant once told me ďOh, itís just a blend of romano & mozzarella.Ē  There is no romano in their cheese. Thereís something sublime and incredible, but it tastes nothing like romano.

The Grande arrived on schedule and it does seem a bit more salty than other mozzarellas out there, giving it a bit more flavor, but it was not mind-blowing, and it did not have the strong, characteristic flavor of  the cheese from my pizzeria. Iím honestly thinking it *could* possibly be some type of white cheddar they use, like Norma does.
I really wish I could buy a pizza and send a slice out to several really knowledgeable people on the forum, but that would be prohibitively expensive to keep it cool.
Actually, Verns did not do anything to keep my Grande loaf cool because itís wintertime.....and it was just fine. I wonder, if I sent a slice of pizza to someone through the mail without a cooler or any type of ice packÖ.do you think it would be okay after 2-3 days of transit? In wintertime? I would really love some feedback about this pizza, Iíd be happy to send a slice to the most knowledgeable people on the forum to try and give feedback onÖ

About the dough, Ryan, I used my manual pasta maker tonight to roll the dough out really thin, flour it, fold it and roll it again. My crust did not look like those layers in my pictures above, it was more like the crackery, hollow, layered crust that you linked to a picture of. So the special laminated crust from my pizzeria remains elusive. I probably floured and folded 10+ times. Oh well, maybe next time Iíll try it with little to no  flour between the layers and see if that helps.
Thank you again, for all your feedback. You really do know a lot about pizza making.
You want some Grande cheese over there in Ohio? HereÖCATCH!  :D

Offline norma427

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2014, 09:20:35 AM »
Zoe,

I agree with Ryan that you probably won't get a lot of help with trying to clone your beloved pizza if you don't want to reveal more details and also show more photos.

I posted in the other cheese thread you posted in that it is very difficult to clone any pizzerias pizza if you don't have nutrition facts and ingredients.  With the crust photo you posted I would think your pizza would be more difficult to clone because of how that crust looks.  I don't know about other members but I never saw a pizza crust that looked like the one you posted.

Right off the top of my head I can't think of many Disney characters that are minor and all that comes to my head right now are Goofy, Daisy Duck and Peg-leg Pete. 

Since you have the Grande cheese you could blend it with some white cheddar to see if that gets you closer to the cheese profile, or even try mild white cheddar.

I think you saw in when I was trying to clone Mack's pizza I used all the help of other forum members and I would not have gotten to where I did without their help.   

Norma
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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2014, 10:40:46 AM »
I think Grande mozzarella tastes considerably different on a baked pizza than it tastes cold. I don't care much for the taste of cold Grande, but I love it on pizza. (For whatever that may be worth.) If you know they're not using Grande, then what I just said doesn't matter anyway.

Very important tip: Don't blindly trust statements on any pizzeria's menu or marketing material. It might be true, but it might not. I was gonna link to a page on the Tommy's web site where they say they bake in "brick ovens" or something, which is a lie (at least with one location), but it looks like they've changed the web site. Here's a page that says something similar, but not as specific as the statement I was looking for: http://www.tommyspizza.com/faq.html.

Regarding mailing/shipping pizza: At the very least, it would probably be possible for someone to learn a bit about the crust, even if it arrived more than a couple days after being baked (and was no longer edible). But I know your focus is not on the crust, at least right now. So I don't know what else can be said about that.

Even though your pasta roller attempt did not work out right, I want to assure you that this crust most certainly is laminated. It may not be done the same way you did it, or the dough may be much different than the dough you used, but it IS laminated. There is no doubt about that. I haven't been consciously thinking very hard about this the last few days, but I'm sure my subconscious is trying to figure out the specifics of this dough and dough management. Because I'm just as curious as you, if not more curious, about the specifics of how they end up with that crust.

Here's one important thing to consider: If you make too many layers, you end up compressing the layers so much that you end up making a crust without these distinct layers. That's a big reason why I've kinda settled at 8 or 9 layers for my Tommy's style crusts. I used to fold two stacked skins into thirds each way (18 layers) before rolling to the desired thickness, but now I fold into halves (8 layers), and it's a totally different result. I could see a big difference when I looked through the Tommy's thread a few days ago.

Just keep trying. I didn't know ANYTHING about Tommy's when I first started trying to clone it, but now I probably know more than just about anyone about that specific style of pizza, possibly including the owners of Tommy's. I wouldn't call your pizza the same style as Tommy's, but it's close. It has the same origins as Tommy's, Shakey's, and Round Table. The pizzas offered by these places are all siblings or cousins. Just be aware that there are so many different variables in making this kind of crust, it might take a while for you or anyone to figure it out.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2014, 12:13:06 PM by Aimless Ryan »

Offline tourmaline

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2014, 02:43:57 AM »
Norma, thanks for your input.

What other details can I reveal? I've posted probably 7 or 8 photos of this pizza in various threads over the last couple months. And I think Iíve provided a legitimate reason why I donít want this pizza place named on the forum. I don't think anyone can help me clone the special flavor, because no one knows what it actually tastes like. Words and pictures only tell so much. It's the taste that is magical, and that cannot be communicated easily, especially when I don't have a sophisticated chef's vocabulary of descriptive terms.
However, I guess if I sent slice/s of pizza out to knowledgeable people in the mail, I could  let them know the name of the pizza place in a PM. Of course, theyíd need to be sworn to secrecy by signing a contract....in tomato sauce.     :D

I think it could be a blend of cheddar & mozz on their pizza, or perhaps even just a cheddar alone. When I went to FSA and the lady read me off a list of cheeses that this pizzeria is contracted for, cheddar WAS one of them. And mozzarella was NOT. Hmmmm...I should have asked her if that cheddar was a white cheddar or not, because if it's a white cheddar, then to me that's pretty conclusive that it's what goes on their pizza. Maybe I'll go back there again and ask them to pull it up again...
I believe they are truthful when they say they grate their own cheese because they gave me that tiny cup of grated cheese and it absolutely did not look like pre-shredded cheese, which has a dryer, more spindly look. Can you recommend a white cheddar that would go good on pizza thatís available at grocery stores from a national brand? Every white cheddar I see at grocery stores seems to say sharp or extra sharpÖ

Ryan, the Grande is the most flavorful mozzarella Iíve tried on pizza. But it just doesnít have the unusual cheese  flavor of this place. Perhaps if it was blended with a cheddar, then maybe.
Perhaps next time I go there for a pizza, Iíll let you know, and Iíll put a slice in a Ziploc baggie, and send it to you, if you like. It should be there in 2-3 days with Priority Mail, and probably since itís winter, itíll still be in great shape. Would you be open to that, or no?

I will keep trying on the crust with my pasta roller, thank you for your advice!
« Last Edit: January 21, 2014, 03:13:55 AM by tourmaline »

Offline norma427

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2014, 06:13:21 AM »
Norma, thanks for your input.

What other details can I reveal? I've posted probably 7 or 8 photos of this pizza in various threads over the last couple months. And I think Iíve provided a legitimate reason why I donít want this pizza place named on the forum. I don't think anyone can help me clone the special flavor, because no one knows what it actually tastes like. Words and pictures only tell so much. It's the taste that is magical, and that cannot be communicated easily, especially when I don't have a sophisticated chef's vocabulary of descriptive terms.
However, I guess if I sent slice/s of pizza out to knowledgeable people in the mail, I could  let them know the name of the pizza place in a PM. Of course, theyíd need to be sworn to secrecy by signing a contract....in tomato sauce.     :D

I think it could be a blend of cheddar & mozz on their pizza, or perhaps even just a cheddar alone. When I went to FSA and the lady read me off a list of cheeses that this pizzeria is contracted for, cheddar WAS one of them. And mozzarella was NOT. Hmmmm...I should have asked her if that cheddar was a white cheddar or not, because if it's a white cheddar, then to me that's pretty conclusive that it's what goes on their pizza. Maybe I'll go back there again and ask them to pull it up again...
I believe they are truthful when they say they grate their own cheese because they gave me that tiny cup of grated cheese and it absolutely did not look like pre-shredded cheese, which has a dryer, more spindly look. Can you recommend a white cheddar that would go good on pizza thatís available at grocery stores from a national brand? Every white cheddar I see at grocery stores seems to say sharp or extra sharpÖ



Zoe,

The more photos of a whole pizza, the bottom crust, a slice, or something else might help.  I know words and photos only tell so much though.  Maybe that would be an idea to send a few slices out to members that are interested to see if the might be able to help you. 

Maybe you could ask FSA how much cheddar you pizzeria purchases so that might help you decide if they use all cheddar.

That crust reminds me of Croissants like Ryan and Dave posted before, but would be flattened some when the toppings are added.  I would not think a pizzeria would go to the trouble of making a Croissant like dough though.  http://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/wkb-2012-croissant-making-log/  Is the bottom crust flaky when eaten and is there docking holes on the bottom crust?

I don't know what you will think of the Cracker Barrel Sharp White Cheddar, but I thought it tasted very good as the cheese on a pizza.  The label is green.  It says Sharp but really isn't.  It almost tastes like my cheddar but is not as creamy, or soft in texture.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2014, 11:27:15 AM »
What other details can I reveal? I've posted probably 7 or 8 photos of this pizza in various threads over the last couple months. And I think Iíve provided a legitimate reason why I donít want this pizza place named on the forum. I don't think anyone can help me clone the special flavor, because no one knows what it actually tastes like.

I've seen two pictures.

No one can help you clone the special flavor because no one knows where to get a taste of it. For all you know, one of the most knowledgeable members on the forum might live right down the street from you. And if so, providing some useful information might prompt that person to try this pizzeria and figure out everything you need to know.

Or there might be someone like me, who has been known to disappear to everywhere in the United States for extended periods. I didn't attempt your cryptic puzzle, but I'm thinking you're in California somewhere. Well, my best friend lives in eastern LA County, and it wouldn't be very strange for me to just head out there and stick around for a month or two. And if I did, both he and I would probably like to go to this place if it's within a couple hundred miles of LA County. Maybe even if it's in Oregon.

Offline norma427

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2014, 12:51:43 PM »
Ryan,

Zoe also posted photos at Reply 82 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,27952.msg291720.html#msg291720 and at  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,28334.msg285651.html#msg285651  Those were the only other photos I saw of pizza she is trying to create.  In the second link it appears there is docking on the rim crust.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Zing

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Re: Special technique for this pizza crust?
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2014, 02:04:42 AM »
From Zoe's Rštsel,  we could be talking about an area of the country where they sell "Danish" mozzarella cheese. There was a discussion on the second page of a thread on Sorrento cheese:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,16872.20.html

Rumiano Cheese Company also makes it, primarily for the Pagliacci chain.


 

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