Author Topic: Hobart mixers  (Read 1965 times)

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Offline Chaze215

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Hobart mixers
« on: January 13, 2014, 06:37:45 PM »
I'm in the market for a mixer and from what I've heard and read, the older Hobarts are made to last and are great. Those that use them or have used them, please give me your feedback and opinions. Breakdowns? The one that has been offered to me is a 30 quart 115v single phase with mixing bowl and attachments for $2200. What do you guys think? Thanks in advance!
Chaz


Offline Chaze215

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2014, 05:43:00 PM »
No Hobart users? Hmmmmmm
Chaz

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2014, 05:58:48 PM »
probably not many who are using that size @Chaze. My Kitchen Aid stand mixer was made by Hobart back before Kitchen Aid was bought out by Whirlpool. It's over 30 years old and still operates like the day it came out of the box. Can't speak for the bigger units, but I would assume they are great machines. I think the bigger ones are still made by Hobart, unlike the home sized Kitchen Aid units.
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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2014, 06:06:18 PM »
No Hobart users? Hmmmmmm

Chaze:  We use a 20 quart hobart from the early 80's.  It works great.   We make 15,  20 oz dough balls at a time in it and it never breaks a sweat.  Pizza dough is pretty light on a mixer. Bagels give it a much harder workout and we have been making hundreds of bagels a day with it for over 5 years.  We bought a new 20 quart thunderbolt mixer as well.  It has worked flawlessy for bagels, pizza dough, and dog biscuit dough (tougher than pizza and less tough than bagels).  I know a hobart repair man and he told me the 30 quart (highest capacity that will run on standart outlet) often get beat to all heck in pizzerias due to continually overloading them.  This usually happens in fairly high volume places that can't spring for a larger mixer so they work it to death.  I would have a technician look it over.  Obvious stuff to watch for are a welded output shaft.  They can snap after continual overloading and a place working it that hard will have it welded back together.  Another is listen for gear noise.  It should run smooth and quiet.  Anyway, unless you are going to be making 100 of dough balls a day and overloading it, a 30 quart hobart mixer will  last a lifetime.  I am casually on the loookout for one and have been for a couple years.  So far all I have found are ones that are beat up or way overpriced.  I keep my eye on craiglist everyday. I found our 20 quart hobart that way, on a rolling cart, for $300 with a hobart bowl and hobart original attachments in great shape.   that is another thing to watch for.  The cheap hobart knock off bowls, attachments sometimes don't mesh up right and the performance is not as good as it would be authentic hobart parts.  Walter
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 06:11:54 PM by waltertore »

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2014, 07:53:56 PM »
Thanks for your input guys. I don't plan on doing 100 doughballs a day since I have a full time job and the mobile business is just on the weekends. Actually, I really don't forsee me doing much more than 100 for private parties anyway. However for vending events im going to need more than 100. Walt, do you use high gluten flour? I think I'm going to have to suck it up and pull the trigger on this Hobart. It's always a bit nerve racking when putting out a good chunk of change for something old/used. :-)
Chaz

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2014, 09:19:51 PM »
Thanks for your input guys. I don't plan on doing 100 doughballs a day since I have a full time job and the mobile business is just on the weekends. Actually, I really don't forsee me doing much more than 100 for private parties anyway. However for vending events im going to need more than 100. Walt, do you use high gluten flour? I think I'm going to have to suck it up and pull the trigger on this Hobart. It's always a bit nerve racking when putting out a good chunk of change for something old/used. :-)

Chaze: We use all purpose, whole wheat, AT, FS, and semolina flours.  Any pizza dough is going to be not much strain at all on that mixer unless you fill it up at 1/2 way or more and  keep you hydration so low it barely comes together using the beater attachment.  Bagels and dog biscuits are the toughest on them when using the dough hook but not enough to cause any problems.   I ruined a dozen KA pro mixers over the years on a much smaller scale  doing what we do with the hobart/thunderbird mixers and they never really break a sweat.  I have worked in commercial bakeries where  60/80/120 quart mixers are working 12 hours or more a day, 7 days a week, with no problems.  What size will your dough balls be? Maybe a 30 quart is too big for you?  The 20 quarts are a lot cheaper and lighter (still heavy as heck) and can be put on a rolling cart.  Just like any size mixer if you are not filling it pretty good it is a hassle to get things to come together.  Walter
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 09:27:23 PM by waltertore »

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2014, 09:25:57 PM »
The reason I ask what kind of flour, they say you have to reduce the capacity when using hg flour. For right now it may be a bit big, but I'm looking to grow into it with more/bigger gigs vs buying for the moment and then need to upgrade. My doughballs are in the area of 300-325g.
Chaz

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2014, 09:34:21 PM »
The reason I ask what kind of flour, they say you have to reduce the capacity when using hg flour. For right now it may be a bit big, but I'm looking to grow into it with more/bigger gigs vs buying for the moment and then need to upgrade. My doughballs are in the area of 300-325g.

I guess it is all about how much dough you hope to make and the environment you will be making it in.  In a really hot workspace I remember having to make small batches because a big load would rise too much by the time it was all balled.  I operate different than most pizza guys.   I like the 20 quart for its small loads.  We put approx 11 lbs of HG flour and aprox 7 lbs of water for our 15, 20oz dough balls. I am sure this is technically overloading the mixer but I have been "overloading" them for years with no problems.  When I mention overloading it, I consider that to be having the ingredients so full that it is hard to get the ingredients to come together without throwing a ton of flour/water all over the place.  I had a student once start the mixer without securing the dough hook properly and it snapped in half.  Stuff like that won't happen if you own it and you run it.  Most commercial mixers are in the hands of people that really could care less about them.  It is just a job and usually a low paying one at that.  These resale guys paint them nice and often times they are mighty tired and beat up under the shine.  I would pay to have a good tech look it over. Walter
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 09:38:51 PM by waltertore »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2014, 09:46:55 AM »
Chaz,

I don't know if this will help but the document set forth below shows the specs for many of the old Hobart mixers. The document was originally at the Hobart website but then suddenly disappeared. Some time after that, I was able to find it again, but with an Australian URL. But it is the same document that was originally at the Hobart website. You may have to use the enlarge feature to make the document more readable.

http://www.hobartfood.com.au/resources/brochure/Mixer%20Capacity%20F-7701(9-05).pdf

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2014, 10:41:44 AM »
Chaz,

I have used my older 20 qt. Hobart to make many kinds of doughs.  I have also used it to mix on higher speeds.  So far my Hobart has not broken down in about 5 years.  I have also mixed more dough than it says it can handle.

Norma
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Offline Chaze215

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2014, 05:34:58 PM »
Pete, that's the same chart I came across recently when looking for capacities of the different size mixers. Thanks! Then I was a bit confused about their use of absorption rate in the chart and how that related to my dough's hydration. In turn where my dough falls on the chart. Maybe you or someone else can explain that a little better to me.
Norma, thanks for your feedback. How much dough are you able to do in 1 batch with the 20 quart?
Chaz

Offline norma427

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2014, 07:56:33 PM »

Norma, thanks for your feedback. How much dough are you able to do in 1 batch with the 20 quart?


Chaz,

I have made 20 lbs of dough at a time and the Hobart didn't seem to mind.  The only problem with that is I had to pull the mixer bowl lever up slowly or I would have had flour flying around.  I only use speed one to mix all of the NY style doughs.

Norma
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Offline Chaze215

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2014, 08:26:47 PM »
Chaz,

I have made 20 lbs of dough at a time and the Hobart didn't seem to mind.  The only problem with that is I had to pull the mixer bowl lever up slowly or I would have had flour flying around.  I only use speed one to mix all of the NY style doughs.

Norma

Now you guys have me debating myself  if I should go with a 20q or 30q. Ugh.
Chaz

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2014, 08:59:28 PM »
Chaz:  Have you made 100 pizzas in a day before?  That is a way lot of work for 1 person and to be working a day job as well.  Making the dough balls, sauce, toppings, getting your rig ready to go, firing it up....    Do you have mobile refrigeration for that many?  Most outdoor events will be in the hot months and keeping 100 dough balls happy in NJ heat would be tough without it.  You probably have thought all this out but I wonder if you have thought about making a maximum number of pies per event that makes it a fun time and not a high blood attack day?   Also training people for a part time/seasonal thing could be a real headache.  They will mean well but your pies will most likely not be like you want them.  For me the 1 man show is the way to go and if you want to add help get 1 person to clean up and prep with shredding cheese, topping, sauce.  You make less money but you split it only 1 way and you get to control  the entire process.  Our 20 oz dough balls are about twice the weight of yours.  We get easily 15 to a mix and can push 20 no sweat on it just a bit of flour will get thrown out.  you can pulse it till it comes together.  So that would give you around 30-40 balls per batch at you weight in a 20 quart mixer (I am getting tired so correct if my math is way off :)
« Last Edit: January 15, 2014, 09:12:34 PM by waltertore »

Offline JConk007

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2014, 09:55:24 PM »
Walter Yes you are correct that it is a lot of work ! 150 + (260 Gram) some days and a full time Job to Boot ! But I Love it ! Chaze there is 1 sweet spiral that I highlty recommend for mixing every type of dough can take up to 1 bag ! Youlll never by another one even if you open a brick and mortar! I have available 1  IM44 Mecnosud spiral  its last of the cheaper ones and I can grab it for you !  let me know if you have any interest it was sold but guy bagged out that same machine on the next container from Italy is  close to $1000 more now !!
lemme know you have the #  ;)
John
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Offline Chaze215

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2014, 10:14:40 PM »
Walt I see what your saying. To answer your first question, I have not made 100 pizzas in a day yet. I'm just starting out on this mobile journey and did a few private parties at the end of the season last year. My hope is to do mostly private events so I don't need to do much more than 100 doughballs at a time. I understand that in the beginning, I'm going to have to do some vending just to get the word out about my business and then ease into just private parties with a few vending events mixed in every so often. THAT is my hope anyway.
I have thought about the work involved in this venture and fully understand the work it takes for a single event. I have helped John at a few of his events and received "on the job training" add well as set up and break down. He has been a great help to me. Right now I'm keeping it in the family as far as my help is concerned. I have trained my dad to work the oven and he surprisingly did a very good job and I have a very supportive wife which is extremely important. I love doing this whole pizza thing and am extremely passionate about it. Without those 2 things and a supportive spouse (if applicable), this type of venture is not going to work. I can't wait for it to get warmer and start doing some parties on the weekends!
Chaz

Offline JConk007

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2014, 10:17:19 PM »
LIKE  ;D
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Offline Chaze215

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2014, 10:18:16 PM »
John, you know I'm looking and interested in a mixer. Send me a message on here or text me the info. Thanks!
Chaz

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2014, 06:31:04 AM »
Chaz:  I wasn't aware of all the training and support you have.  It sounds a lot of fun now!  That is great you have found such a passion John.  Next time I am in NJ hopefully I can taste some of your guys pies.  Walter

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Hobart mixers
« Reply #19 on: January 16, 2014, 09:56:51 AM »
Pete, that's the same chart I came across recently when looking for capacities of the different size mixers. Thanks! Then I was a bit confused about their use of absorption rate in the chart and how that related to my dough's hydration. In turn where my dough falls on the chart. Maybe you or someone else can explain that a little better to me.
Chaz,

The absorption ratio as referenced in the notes at the botton of the first page of the Hobart document at http://www.hobartfood.com.au/resources/brochure/Mixer%20Capacity%20F-7701(9-05).pdf is basically a hydration value. I believe that it it possible that that number is the rated absorption value of a flour as specified by the miller. For example, if you read the opening post at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4646.msg39204.html#msg39204, you will see the rated absorption values for three of the King Arthur flours. Most millers--and that includes General Mills--do not publicize the rated absorption values for their flours but they may provide the numbers upon specific request. As a practical matter, most rated absorption values are pretty close to what one might actually use as hydration values in practice. In relation to the absoption ratio, the Hobart notes make mention of a flour moisture of 12%. As you may know, in the U.S., most basic white flours have a moisture content of around 14% at the miller's facility. However, by the time it emerges at the tail end of the distribution channel, the moisture content can be around 12%. It would be highly unlikely under normal conditions for the moisture content to drop much below 12%. What all of this means is that there may be a need to tweak the hydration value of a dough to compensate for the altered moisture content of the flour.

The Hobart notes also mention the need to reduce the dough batch size by 10% if high gluten flour is used. Moreover, as the notes also say, one shouldn't use the second mixer speed for a dough with an AR of below 50%. Unless you plan to use high gluten flour and/or a dough with a hydration value of below 50%, then neither of these admonitions will apply to you.

The bottom line is that you should treat the AR value as essentially synonymous with the hydration value you plan to use but be prepared to make minor adjustments to the dough because of the flour's moisture content, and to adjust the dough batch size if you decide to use high gluten flour, in which case you would use only the first mixer speed.

Peter


 

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