Author Topic: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?  (Read 1178 times)

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Offline Spumoni215

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Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« on: January 15, 2014, 12:48:26 PM »
I was watching a video on Youtube the other day of Roberto from Keste in NYC doing a demonstration.  While the sound wasn't great quality it sounded like the suggested using fresh yeast (the class was in Canada so I think he was referring to differences in ingredients between here and Italy).  I could have heard this wrong but I'm fairly certain he mentioned using fresh yeast and a little sugar in the dough. 

Has anyone heard this?  Have you used fresh yeast in your dough and if so how do you convert the ratio to use?  Fresh yeast is available at my local supermarket.   

Thanks for your help


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2014, 01:08:49 PM »
My guess is that fresh yeast is the most common form used in NP worldwide. Here is a conversion: http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm

I doubt he adds any sugar.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Spumoni215

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2014, 01:22:35 PM »
Thanks Craig-I think he was suggesting that because of the ingredients in North America to add a little bit of sugar, I can't be sure though since the sound quality on the video wasn't great.   Thanks for the conversion table.   Have you noticed a taste difference with fresh yeast?

My guess is that fresh yeast is the most common form used in NP worldwide. Here is a conversion: http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm

I doubt he adds any sugar.

Offline sub

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2014, 04:09:10 PM »
Hi

Here's a great tool to help you with the fresh yeast  pizza2calc


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2014, 04:15:26 PM »
Thanks Craig-I think he was suggesting that because of the ingredients in North America to add a little bit of sugar, I can't be sure though since the sound quality on the video wasn't great.   Thanks for the conversion table.   Have you noticed a taste difference with fresh yeast?

I rarely use anything besides sourdough. If I use baker's yeast, I use IDY. I don't have good access to fresh yeast.

It would be very unusual for a serious Neapolitan pizzeria to add sugar to the dough in North America or otherwise.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline thezaman

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2014, 04:56:26 PM »
if roberto was targeting the home cook he may suggest a little sugar or malt as well as a little oil. caputo flour needs help to cook at lower  home oven temperatures 500 to 550 degrees. in a restaurant setting targeting neapolitan he would not. when i make caputo dough i use from .5 gram up to 3 grams per kilo of flour depending on how long i need to hold the dough. i use fresh yeast only. 

Offline Spumoni215

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2014, 05:41:18 PM »
Hi so what are you referring to below-sugar?    I think you were correct that he was talking about using caputo at home which is possibly why he suggested adding some sugar.   Thanks and I'll look forward to hearing from you.

. when i make caputo dough i use from .5 gram up to 3 grams per kilo of flour depending on how long i need to hold the dough. i use fresh yeast only.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2014, 06:07:54 PM »
Hi so what are you referring to below-sugar?    I think you were correct that he was talking about using caputo at home which is possibly why he suggested adding some sugar.   Thanks and I'll look forward to hearing from you.

Larry (thezaman) is referring to fresh yeast.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Qarl

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2014, 08:22:21 PM »
Yes... see this thread.

I have done it successfully many times

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21730.0.html


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2014, 01:59:03 AM »
And there is this incredible result: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=21730.0

Though I bet Marlon could make perfect NP with anything he is given.  ;D
Pizza is not bread.


Offline Spumoni215

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2014, 06:49:32 PM »
Hi Craig-I wanted to ask. Does using a sourdough natural yeast give the crust a sourdough like taste at all?   I'm curious to know as to why you use it?  I've read that it makes the flour easier to digest rather than that though every recipe I've looked at in books, etc  suggests using IDY.

Thanks

I rarely use anything besides sourdough. If I use baker's yeast, I use IDY. I don't have good access to fresh yeast.

It would be very unusual for a serious Neapolitan pizzeria to add sugar to the dough in North America or otherwise.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fresh yeast in Neapolitan pies?
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2014, 07:05:09 PM »
Hi Craig-I wanted to ask. Does using a sourdough natural yeast give the crust a sourdough like taste at all?   I'm curious to know as to why you use it?  I've read that it makes the flour easier to digest rather than that though every recipe I've looked at in books, etc  suggests using IDY.

Thanks

It can, but that's not what I shoot for. Mine has no sour taste - it's more of a creamy taste - quite different from baker's yeast. I don't know about the digestibility, rather I think cookbooks recommend ADY because unless it is a very specialized SD cookbook, there is just no way to give a recipe for SD. There are way too many variables and techniques. YOu can see what all goes into my process here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,20479.0.html

It's a lot more work and complexity than baker's yeast, and it requires maintaining a living culture. It's like having a pet in many ways. For me it's worth the extra effort. For some it isn't. Like everything else, it's just personal preference. You can make a great pie with IDY too.
Pizza is not bread.