Author Topic: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza  (Read 843 times)

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Offline The Dub Oracle

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gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« on: January 17, 2014, 06:44:12 AM »
Hello.

Who has experience with gorgonzola on a napoli pizza ?
I love gorgonzola but i discovered that the taste is gone when i bake them in 1.5 minutes at a temperature of 400 degree celsius, or 752 R.
It vapourises i think, it cant stand the temperature, i now use "danisch blue" cheese that has a mutch stronger taste and it wont vapourise the taste.
But gorgonzola is mutch better of cause.
I also bought a "pikant gorgonzola" for this reason with more blue vains but it wont help, still it taste like nothing.
What to do ? who knows ?
Must i buy the "extra pikant gorgonzola" with even more blue vains or am i doomed to bake on lower temperatures ?
And what must the temperature be before the taste vapourises ?


Offline kdefay

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2014, 02:27:47 AM »
Try putting it on near the end of the bake.  Take the pizza out, put the gorgonzola on and put it back in the oven to finish.  I use that technique for a number of toppings that don't like to be in the oven for the full bake time.

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 11:02:39 AM »
I had done that some times, its possible.
I ask myself how pizzaria's do this, or do they bake on a lower temperature.
Thanks.

Offline kdefay

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2014, 08:32:22 PM »
Not sure how other pizzerias do it.  I use a Danish Blue Cheese because it's what I can get here.  I bake at about 370C and it holds it taste nicely. 

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2014, 03:28:39 PM »
I've had the exact opposite experience using blue veined cheeses. I usually find the to be overpowering unless I cut them heavily with mascarpone, mozz, or something else mild.

~60 second bakes @ 900F+.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2014, 03:41:08 PM »
I find that also, Craig, I use very little blue cheese on the pizza I cook with them.  I haven't used Gorgonzola though.

Offline dhorst

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2014, 03:43:06 PM »
I like to break up a bit of gorgonzola or a bit of blue cheddar with a touch of olive oil and fresh roma tomatoes, aleppo and cracked pepper and dollop the mixture on very sparingly just before pulling the pie out of the oven.  Top it with lemon and olive oil dressed arugula post oven, and it's so awesome and balanced.  A drizzle of orange blossom honey into the blue mix is often nice if the blue is quite piquant.

Offline kdefay

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2014, 11:18:32 PM »
At my shop, a 14" pizza gets 12 grams of blue cheese.  It is meant to be an accent to a pizza, not to overpower it.   The way we handle it is to crumble up the blue cheese and freeze it before dividing it up into individual bags of 12 grams each.  These are then kept in the freezer until an order is received.  A soft cheese like this can be messy, so it's just easier to work with when it frozen.  Frozen crumbles get sprinkled onto the pizza before baking.  Our bake time is 3-4 minutes and it holds it taste really well.

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2014, 08:08:07 AM »
Danish blue will stand the extreme heat when you bake it at 400C but gorgonzola not.
Danish blue is a very strong cheese indeed, and its overpowering when you use to mutch.
Fresh Danish blue also taste like terpentine and is sour, i found out that you must ripe it in the fridge for a week or two, it tastes mutch better afterwards and is mutch less acid like, the terpentine taste is also gone.
But i prefer gorgonzola cheese, thats why i ask this.
The key for a good pizza is the baking temepature and that must be not lower then 350C i think, when i bake it longer then 3 minutes the taste is not that fresh anymore but if its shorter then 1.5 minutes its tastes to raw with less taste ( with vegetables toppings )
Last weekend i found out that 375C with a bake time of 2 minutes is perfect, the vegatebles release more taste but its not overkooked.
In this way how it is for me i must place the gorgonzola on top my pizza in the last stage of baking, it seems the only way.
Gorgonzola pikant or extra pikant is hard to get here by the way, i must order it from special stores.
Dolce gorgonzola is total useless bye the way, you must have that green blue remains of the fungee on top of the pizza, thats the taste.  :drool:

 
« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 08:10:10 AM by The Dub Oracle »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2014, 09:11:35 AM »
Fresh Danish blue also taste like terpentine...
TheDubOracle,

Out of curiosity, did you actually taste turpentine or did you mean that Fresh Danish blue cheese smells like turpentine? I sometimes ask a similar question when members have said that their pizza crusts tasted like cardboard.

Peter


Offline tommy

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2014, 09:17:12 AM »
I find blues are very strong, and if there's a blob of it on the pie, that bite will ruin anything following it.

I freeze the blue and shave it on after the pie comes out of the oven. This allows for a very uniform and controlled dusting.

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: gorgonzola on a napoli pizza
« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2014, 02:29:09 PM »
TheDubOracle,

Out of curiosity, did you actually taste turpentine or did you mean that Fresh Danish blue cheese smells like turpentine? I sometimes ask a similar question when members have said that their pizza crusts tasted like cardboard.

Peter

It taste like it, a really unplessend taste.
Its a byproduct from that sour taste i think, only when its to fresh.
Cardboard  :-D
They must have used very very old flower  ;D