Author Topic: Perfect pizza  (Read 1803 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2014, 11:19:48 AM »
Another thing worth pointing out is cold ferments, I haven't seen a bread recipe call for this but it is widely used in pizza making.
Nick (chasenpse),

In looking at the bread dough recipes in Prof. Calvel's book The Taste of Bread, I saw several bread dough recipes calling for the cold fermentation of preferments, for example, for 15-18 hours at 39-41 degrees F. But, as best I can tell, the final proof of the dough was at room temperature.

I also recall that Nancy Silverton, in her book Breads from the La Brea Bakery, has dough recipes that use natural leavenings and that call for cold fermentation of the dough.

Peter


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2014, 11:39:25 AM »
I also don't feel that it minimizes pizza in any way. If anything, it accentuates the art of making dough.
nickr,

I believe that these are largely matters of personal preference and maybe conditioning. For example, as I noted in Reply 3 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10160.msg88866/topicseen.html#msg88866 and also in Reply 23 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1599.msg39955/topicseen.html#msg39955, where I discussed my experiences using preferments and where the crusts ended up having baguette-like taste, I found that I preferred that my pizza crusts not have that taste. But that is just me. Had I started out on the bread side and spent a lot of time there, my reactions might well have been different. My view is that people should do what pleases and satisfies them, and maybe their prospective customers, the most.

Peter

Offline chasenpse

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2014, 11:42:06 AM »
Nick (chasenpse),

In looking at the bread dough recipes in Prof. Calvel's book The Taste of Bread, I saw several bread dough recipes calling for the cold fermentation of preferments, for example, for 15-18 hours at 39-41 degrees F. But, as best I can tell, the final proof of the dough was at room temperature.

I also recall that Nancy Silverton, in her book Breads from the La Brea Bakery, has dough recipes that use natural leavenings and that call for cold fermentation of the dough.

Peter

Ok, you got me. I'll have to do some more reading on the subject! It's been recommended to me to stay away from cold ferments when using natural leavening agents like starters because of the lack of 'power' compared to commercial yeast, although I'm starting to think about challenging that. Perhaps a test is in order, 4 dough balls of which two will be under developed and two will be autolysed, slap and folded, etc. and compare a RT ferment vs. a 3 day cold ferment.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2014, 11:50:48 AM »
Ok, you got me. I'll have to do some more reading on the subject! It's been recommended to me to stay away from cold ferments when using natural leavening agents like starters because of the lack of 'power' compared to commercial yeast, although I'm starting to think about challenging that. Perhaps a test is in order, 4 dough balls of which two will be under developed and two will be autolysed, slap and folded, etc. and compare a RT ferment vs. a 3 day cold ferment.
Nick (chasenpse),

What you say is generally true but if you use a lot of sourdough starter you can get away with cold fermentation. For example, Nancy Silverton has a basic dough recipe that calls for a cup and a third of "White Starter". When I converted that to baker's percent, it was around 35% by weight of the flour. Also, my recollection is that Jeff Varasano used around 8% starter, although he was using much higher than 8% when he first started. It is when you get to sub-5% levels that you can run into problems with cold fermentation using natural leavening systems.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 24, 2014, 11:54:57 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline nick57

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2014, 08:22:57 PM »
Here's another lovely. I think it's great that a recipe and a picture can start a interesting conversation, and in the process I learned some new things. As they say "A picture is worth a thousand words." I have never tried to make one of these. Today I saw the Chef Boyardee pizza kits and thought about picking it up for fun. Maybe next time.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2014, 08:26:44 PM by nick57 »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2014, 09:00:20 PM »
Yes, please do Nick....it's "fun for the whole family!".  :)

Bob
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Offline waynesize

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2014, 09:02:29 PM »
Pizza, just like Mom used to make.  When we had pizza at home, when I was a kid, it was Chef Boyardee. We enjoyed it, because it was all we knew. Then we got to go to Pizza Hut, in the late 1960s and early 70s. Luckily, my tastes have evolved well beyond those early pies.

Wayne

Offline norma427

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2014, 09:25:06 PM »
Here's another lovely. I think it's great that a recipe and a picture can start a interesting conversation, and in the process I learned some new things. As they say "A picture is worth a thousand words." I have never tried to make one of these. Today I saw the Chef Boyardee pizza kits and thought about picking it up for fun. Maybe next time.

Nick,

The Chef Boyardee Pizza Kit made a good pizza in my opinion except for the sauce.  I posted about the Chef Boyardee pizza at Reply 21 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26483.msg281229.html#msg281229

Norma
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Offline dmckean44

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2014, 11:26:36 PM »
Nick,

The Chef Boyardee Pizza Kit made a good pizza in my opinion except for the sauce.  I posted about the Chef Boyardee pizza at Reply 21 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26483.msg281229.html#msg281229

Wow!

Offline nick57

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Re: Perfect pizza
« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2014, 10:32:28 AM »
I second that "Wow" Norma! Your boxed pizza looks great! I'm hooked. I will give it a try. My oven only goes to 550, so I may cut back the H20 a little to get a better rise. I'll post a pic


 

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