Author Topic: Newbie - dough too thick  (Read 566 times)

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Offline Pie Charles

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Newbie - dough too thick
« on: January 23, 2014, 09:36:23 PM »
I'm going for a neapolitan style pizza. but i cant seem to get the dough thin enough.

Here are my steps:

Using Kitchen Aid dough mixer:
pour in 2.5 cups warm water
add 2 tspn dry yeast
wait 20 min's
add 4.5 cups of all purpose King Arthur flour
add 2 tspn of salt
knead on low for 10 min's

dough pours out onto marble slab (wet/sticky).
let sit for an hour, covered.
work into 2 dough balls. i have to add quite a bit of flour at this point just to be able to work it into a ball at all. but it's still sticky even after adding about 2 cups of flour, and i put it in 2 containers in the fridge for 24-48 hr cold rise.

i'm unable to get the dough thin enough. i keep stretching it out (using hands) and will let it rest 15 min's, then go back and stretch again.
but my pizza comes out too thick.
any ideas?

thank you


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Newbie - dough too thick
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2014, 08:37:06 AM »
How much does your dough rise during the cold fermentation period?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pie Charles

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Re: Newbie - dough too thick
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2014, 08:48:39 AM »
not a whole lot. not double the size or anything.
i've been putting the dough in a plastic bowl with a towel over it in the fridge.
i made some last night and put it in a sealed tupperware container. not sure if that will make a difference but thought i'd try it.

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Newbie - dough too thick
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2014, 01:07:36 PM »
i would try using less water, perhaps 1/2c less and see how that works. 3 cups of flour with 1c of water is going to land you around ~55% hydration if you measure heavy on your flour. a few years back i took my scales to my mothers and had her measure out her flour, water etc of her bread machine recipe, and i adjusted her methods and found out that there was too much oil (fat, butter) which came in at 17% and hydration was only around 50%. final recipe wound up using 3c flour and 1 1/4c water on bread flour and 1 1/3c water on high gluten flour to land hydration around ~61-64%.

4.5c flour
2c water
1/2t yeast
2t salt

try your recipe as a countertop rise, room temp, with one doughball. keep the rest in the fridge. when your counter rise dough is doubled or slightly more than doubled, try using it and see if you like the results.

in short: too much water for the AP flour, and you are probably going to want to try 3 or even 4 dough balls. bread flour will greatly help you in making dough in the pizza aspect. also, look on here for how to stretch and fold your dough, it will add a great amount of strength to your dough that kneading isn't going to provide.

also, scales are cheap. 1g increment mechanical scales are going to be more than enough to start off accurate measurements, and there is plenty of members here that use measuring spoons with great success for the salt/sugar/yeast aspect of the recipe. certain flours like specific hydration more than other flours, and some will tolerate higher amounts of water. specifically high gluten flours or lesser flours with vital wheat gluten added.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2014, 01:11:51 PM by c0mpl3x »
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Offline Pie Charles

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Re: Newbie - dough too thick
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2014, 05:34:44 PM »
Thanks compl3x - I used a little more flour and also made sure the dough was completely room temperature (may still have been a bit cold when i tried to roll it out before) and that worked. got a very thin and manageable crusth.
Thanks!


 

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