Author Topic: Help with my dough  (Read 559 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Azdevil09

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 14
  • Location: Arizona, USA
  • I Love Pizza!
Help with my dough
« on: January 23, 2014, 10:35:53 PM »
Looking for some help with my dough. Just getting started and I can not get that "airy" crust on my Neapolitan pizzas. The crust just ends up flat. My recipe is as follows:
500g Tipo 00 (can get the brand if needed)
325g water
10g salt
3g active yeast

I am stuck with cooking on my Grand Turbo gas grill and a stone. I light all 6 burners on high and heat my stone for 30+ minutes. Not sure how hot it is getting but I would guess 600+. Pizzas cook in about 2-3 minutes and the crust always starts to burn before my toppings are all cooked off. Last fact is that I feel that the center of the crust (as in center of the pizza) is never quite done as crust near the outside of the pizza.

Any thoughts on what I can do with what I got?

Much appreciated.


Offline dellavecchia

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2628
Re: Help with my dough
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2014, 06:51:58 AM »
First, can you tell us your dough workflow in detail?

John

Offline Azdevil09

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 14
  • Location: Arizona, USA
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Help with my dough
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2014, 09:04:57 AM »
Still learning all the "lingo" so hope I guessed correctly.

Mix flour and water by hand in bowl.
Let rest for 10 min in bowl.
Then add salt and yeast and knead dough for 10-12 minutes.
Let rest at room temp for 60 min and then transfer to refrigerator to rest for 40ish hours. (depends on what time I make the dough, use it 2 days later)

That what you are looking for.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21904
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Help with my dough
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2014, 11:05:15 AM »
Azdevil09,

Using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, I converted your recipe into baker's percent format and got the following:

Flour (100%):
Water (65%):
ADY (0.60%):
Salt (2%):
Total (167.6%):
500 g  |  17.64 oz | 1.1 lbs
325 g  |  11.46 oz | 0.72 lbs
3 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.79 tsp | 0.26 tbsp
10 g | 0.35 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.79 tsp | 0.6 tbsp
838 g | 29.56 oz | 1.85 lbs | TF = N/A

The first thing that I noticed, from your last post, is that you used the ADY dry in your dough. The proper way to use ADY is to prehydrate it in a small portion of the formula water (about 4-5 times the weight of the ADY) for about 10 minutes at around 105 degrees F. The prehydrated ADY can then be added to the rest of the formula water, which ideally should be at a temperature to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 75-80 degrees. If you would like to get a better understanding of what you can expect when you use the ADY dry, you might take a look at the post at Reply 48 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg64308.html#msg64308.

The second thing that I noticed was the hydration value. It is 65%. That is very high for 00 flour, which, for the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour, has a rated absorption value of 55-57% (see http://caputoflour.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/00-Pizzeria-SPECS.pdf). With 65% hydration, and assuming that the 0.60% ADY properly performed its assigned duties (notwithstanding its dry form), it is possible that the dough ended up with an open and airy texture with above average volume and height. A good part of that volume/height might have been attributed to the high hydration. If that happened, then it is possible that the dough acquired insulating characteristics. What that usually means is that the bottom heat will be directed more to the bottom of the pizza and cause it to bake/brown more fully rather than passing through the dough to bake the things on the top of the pizza. So, you might not only end up with underbaked cheese and toppings but portions of the crust that are pasty and underbaked.

To the above, I would add that 00 flours normally require much higher bake temperatures than around 600 degrees F. If you had used higher bake temperatures, you might have been able to overcome the effects of the high hydration value. Next time, you might try lowering the hydration value to around 58% to see if that improves matters in your particular oven and bake temperature. You should also prehydrate the ADY as discussed above.

If you proceed with the above suggestions, I hope that you will return and post your results.

Peter

Offline Azdevil09

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 14
  • Location: Arizona, USA
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Help with my dough
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2014, 06:07:24 PM »
Thanks for the reply Peter, that was a very informative read. I have ALOT to learn! Thanks again.