Author Topic: Is it unorthodox to cold-ferment and stretch & bake a pizza straight from the +  (Read 449 times)

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Offline amooola

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fridge/cooler? Does anyone have experience with this?


Offline Tscarborough

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It is the normal way I do it.  It might be a little hard to do with a low hydration dough though.

Online norma427

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fridge/cooler? Does anyone have experience with this?

amooola,

You can open dough balls right out of the fridge and use them to make pizzas, but why would you want to do that?  If given a warm-up time the dough balls are a lot easier to open, and also less prone to bubbling in the middle when baking.  I have opened cold dough balls right out of the prep fridge, but usually they need a little rest time, in between opening the skin, for them to be able opened better.  I have a little warmer cabinet that I use sometimes to warm up dough balls if I become busier and don't have enough dough balls warming up on the bench.

Norma
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Offline amooola

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amooola,

You can open dough balls right out of the fridge and use them to make pizzas, but why would you want to do that?  If given a warm-up time the dough balls are a lot easier to open, and also less prone to bubbling in the middle when baking.  I have opened cold dough balls right out of the prep fridge, but usually they need a little rest time, in between opening the skin, for them to be able opened better.  I have a little warmer cabinet that I use sometimes to warm up dough balls if I become busier and don't have enough dough balls warming up on the bench.

Norma

I made one batch of dough and opened some balls after having them sit at room temp for 1 and 2 hours (note that room temp on the prep table is often 78-79 degrees as it's directly across from the pizza oven). They stretched easily, but after the 2 hour mark, they stretched almost too easily and didn't hold up well to any toppings. I started pulling them straight from the cooler, opening them up half way, letting them sit for around 2 minutes and then stretched them to size and it worked beautifully. I love the outcome and I don't have to waste any dough balls this way. I just wasn't sure if this was the norm for anyone.



Offline Gluten4punishment

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When I worked at a pizza place a long time ago that is how we always did it. Now at home I will let them sit out for 30 minutes, I don't like it too soft.

Offline David Esq.

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Forkish recommends this with his higher hydration pizza dough. Says it gives dough strength for the toss and stretch.

Offline jvp123

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I fiddled with this a bit and perceived my dough to have more oven spring and thus a more airy crumb when the dough balls had ample time to warm up.  (1-2 hours depending on the actual room temp and how proofed my dough looked.)

When the dough was colder the crust seemed to be a bit more bready and dense. 

This is by no means scientific analysis, but just what I thought might be going on and why.
Jeff

Offline David Esq.

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Dough is so tricky.  Letting it come up to room temperature for an hour or two basically means the dough is continuing to ferment, which means the dough may have needed to ferment more to get to where you wanted it -- and maybe that would have given a similar result had you left it in the fridge for say, another 6 hours ... but that would also have some impact on the flavor of the dough since a longer cold ferment is different from a shorter warm ferment.

I've had my sourdough pizza dough in the fridge for a couple of nights now. Plan to bake right out of the fridge tonight after work if my kids let me.

Offline mkevenson

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Hmmm, Cold fermentation is = to retarded fermentation. I think that the topic question all depends on the amount of yeast used and the activity of the yeast before it goes in the cooler. I use both cold and controlled fermentation temps, with different batches. I use relatively small amounts of yeast and the DB goes directly in the cooler after DB formation when using cold ferm. I bench my DB approx 2 hrs after it comes out of the fridge with good results.

Mark
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Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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As a disclaimer, I'm a mere passionate amateur, so this is just based on my experience, but I've had (what I think are) really good results working directly out of the fridge..or within 5 or 10 minutes of it.

My current dough is pretty high hydration at 70% and following the Forkish technique David mentions, I've had mostly good results. With a 3-5 day cold ferment in the fridge  my dough balls  are quite soft  and easy to shape  directly  from the fridge. I'd tested identical dough balls direct from fridge vs two hours at room temperature and can't really taste or see a difference (my judging skills are not as advanced as many of you, however) 


Offline mkevenson

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As a disclaimer, I'm a mere passionate amateur, so this is just based on my experience, but I've had (what I think are) really good results working directly out of the fridge..or within 5 or 10 minutes of it.

My current dough is pretty high hydration at 70% and following the Forkish technique David mentions, I've had mostly good results. With a 3-5 day cold ferment in the fridge  my dough balls  are quite soft  and easy to shape  directly  from the fridge. I'd tested identical dough balls direct from fridge vs two hours at room temperature and can't really taste or see a difference (my judging skills are not as advanced as many of you, however) 
Just out of curiosity what % yeast, and what type do you use?
Mark
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Offline Chicago Bob

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This topic comes up often and there are a lot of folks here that say to leave it out on the counter for hours.

How many NY style pizza joints do that?  :-\
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Offline David Esq.

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I think that could work with a tiny amount of yeast but given how warm a pizzeria is, maybe that isn't an option.

Online waltertore

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With a commercial set up leaving dough on the bench for an hour or 2 is ideal if the dough is prime. If it is getting on the old side in the fridge taking it out to early will make working with it difficult.  Taking it right from the fridge to the oven is something I don't like to do.  The crust doesn't open as easy as when warmed up some so I usually get in a basic circle of open and then let it sit a few before tossing.  But sometimes a customer will come in and we are out of bench warmed dough and wrapping up for the day but do have some in the fridge for tomorrow.  I explain it will not have the nice puffiness that our crusts normally have and it bakes a bit different because the dough is so cold going on the stone.  I don't have bubbling issues with a cold dough under the cheese/sauce.  I will have bubbling issues when I don't put enough sauce/cheese on a pie.  Anyway, I prefer not to go straight from fridge to oven.  Most places I worked in back in the NYC area had the dough out for a while to warm up.  Walter
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 09:02:14 PM by waltertore »

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Mark--I'm experimenting because the amount of yeast I need seems to change seasonally here in Northeast. I'd been using .25% IDY, in the cooler months with very good results, but during the summer, even with AC  on a good part of the time, I was finding that during my cold-ferment, the dough was becoming over-fermented, and I was losing flavor and oven spring. So for the past weeks, I've been experimenting with reduced amounts of IDY, in the .03% to .06% range and getting good results. Naturally, now it's cooling again, and I wasn't making notes last fall and winter, so I'm trying get the right amounts to gradually add back some of the yeast.  Right now, I have four different formulations in the fridge (which leaves little room for non-pizza food ..if there is such a thing) including  poolish and levain versions...all affected by room temperature (though the levain has no IDY)