Author Topic: Shameful oven spring  (Read 828 times)

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Offline WarEagle09

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Shameful oven spring
« on: February 10, 2014, 09:06:41 AM »
Last night I made two pies using the Glutenboy recipe. I followed his recipe, adjusting the final weight to yield two dough balls for 14’’ pies with a .069 TF:

Flour (100%):    375.4 g  |  13.24 oz | 0.83 lbs
Water (62%):    232.75 g  |  8.21 oz | 0.51 lbs
IDY (.19%):    0.71 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.24 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
Salt (2.25%):    8.45 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.76 tsp | 0.59 tbsp
Total (164.44%):   617.31 g | 21.77 oz | 1.36 lbs | TF = 0.070725
Single Ball:   308.65 g | 10.89 oz | 0.68 lbs

(Note: After the two-hour rise and reball, the balls weighed 306 g and 305 g. The nominal TF was .069 before bowl residue compensation, so my 2.5% BRC was pretty close).
1.   I used Gold Medal Bread Flour supplemented with Hodgson Mill VWG to yield a protein content of approximately 14%.
2.   I added a 1/4 tsp of Fleischmann’s Bread Machine yeast for simplicity to the flour/VWG mixture.
3.   I followed Glutenboy’s workflow, and I weighed the salt (I did not use volume measurements for the salt)
4.   I used a dough hook because I did not have a spiral mixer for my KA home mixer.
5.   After adding the final batch of flour mixture, I kneaded the dough with the mixer and by hand (while still in the bowl), until the dough pulled cleanly from the bowl. The dough was homogeneous but sticky, and I continued kneading until it was no longer sticky. I didn’t feel like I overkneaded it, but, in hindsight, maybe I did.

I used tap-water which was approximately 65 – 70 F out of the tap. After kneading, I placed the dough in a covered bowl greased with olive oil for the 2 hour rise. The ambient temperature was approximately 70 F. I then balled and scaled the two balls into separate greased bowls and placed them in the refrigerator.

After three days, it appeared the dough balls had almost tripled in size, and were looking very gassy. One was developing a bubble. Not wanting to punch it down, I opted to cook the pies after a three day rise (I know this is a deviation from his recipe, but I figured it would not be a major deviation).

I formed the pie on a floured surface (the bench flour was Gold Medal AP flour… does it matter if you use AP or bread flour for your bench flour?). I formed the pie in a fairly standard way, by tapping from almost the center out towards the edge with my fingers and spinning the dough on the surface, then stretching while still on the counter, then stretching by hand, then a few tosses. I left a slight rim… nothing big, but there was a rim. The pie was ~14’’ when I was done.

I topped both pizzas with Cento crushed tomatoes that had been in the fridge (to marinate with the herbs, salt, and sugar). I added 8 oz of shredded Sorrento whole cheese mozz to one pie, and 8 oz of Publix part skim mozz to the other. Both mozzes had spent about ~10-15 minutes in the freezer (shredded) so the pies would get more browning before the cheese was done. An assortment of meats and vegetables was also added to each pie.

The pies were cooked at 550 F on a 3/4’’ cordierite stone that had been preheated (on the lowest rack) at that temperature for 1 ½ hours. (This was in a conventional electric oven) It took about 5 minutes for each pie to cook before the cheese started to brown and I had to pull them out.

As you can see from the pictures below, the oven spring was shameful. (I use that cheap Walmart aluminum pizza tray as a pizza-cutting surface, not to cook on)

I also think there was a slight gumline, but I’m not an expert on that. I may have formed a smaller rim when forming the dough, but I’ve also previously done the Lehmann dough recipe with a bigger rim, and I ended up with a really bready crust (e.g. very small air pockets similar to bread). I also experienced similar oven spring issues with the Lehmann recipe, but the rim was so big it almost didn’t matter.

What is going wrong here? Why is my crust not blowing up like I see in the pictures on the other discussion boards? Any help is very much appreciated.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2014, 07:21:05 PM by WarEagle09 »


Offline PizzaAlaJoey

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Re: Shameful oven spring
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2014, 04:34:50 PM »
My less-educated guess would be the fridge was a bit too warm and caused the yeast to eat most of the sugars. The other thing I think happened was you used a pan. Despite using your stone the pan will block a lot of the heat that transfers in the early stages giving more oven spring. If you feel comfortable enough using a peel and sliding the pizza onto the stone even as big as that is you should get significantly more rise. By the way it looks pretty damn good still. A lot of the pizzas I see on reddit.com/r/pizza are completely unappetizing looking.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Shameful oven spring
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2014, 05:04:56 PM »
I agree with PizzaAlaJoey, I think your fridge is too warm, or it is being opened a lot and allowed to warm. I use a similar formula but with even more yeast and I never have my doughs rise anywhere near as much as your's are. I always keep f=my cold fermented doughs in an extra fridge located in my cellar, and it is rarely opened so it stays nice and cold. Try placing your doughs in the lower part of the fridge pushed to the back to avoid them from warming due to repeated opening of the fridge. Also, try uping your yeast amount a little while turning down the temperature of your fridge. Actually, if your fridge is cold enough, your doughs won't rise much at all in cold storage, you should look to get your rise as the dough warms and during baking.

Offline WarEagle09

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Re: Shameful oven spring
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2014, 07:47:47 PM »
Please see the highlighted sentence from the original post. Thanks!

Offline WarEagle09

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Re: Shameful oven spring
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2014, 07:53:21 PM »
I agree with PizzaAlaJoey, I think your fridge is too warm, or it is being opened a lot and allowed to warm. I use a similar formula but with even more yeast and I never have my doughs rise anywhere near as much as your's are. I always keep f=my cold fermented doughs in an extra fridge located in my cellar, and it is rarely opened so it stays nice and cold. Try placing your doughs in the lower part of the fridge pushed to the back to avoid them from warming due to repeated opening of the fridge. Also, try uping your yeast amount a little while turning down the temperature of your fridge. Actually, if your fridge is cold enough, your doughs won't rise much at all in cold storage, you should look to get your rise as the dough warms and during baking.

I always keep my dough in the back of the fridge, in plastic containers. The next notch down on the temperature dial freezes my milk, so I'll have live with the temperature setting as it is.

Offline scarboni

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Re: Shameful oven spring
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2014, 08:09:03 PM »
I'm not sure what his original recipe calls for...but I say shorten the time it sits outside before you first put it in the cooler, especially if you plan on holding it in your fridge for a long period of time. It sounds like your dough was already over proofed by the time you went to make a pie with it.

Offline PizzaAlaJoey

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Re: Shameful oven spring
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2014, 08:25:29 PM »
That sounds like it. Sorry I misread about the pan.

Offline pdog

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Re: Shameful oven spring
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2014, 08:28:45 PM »
I apologize if this may be a  stupid questions, but do you cover the dough in the fridge?

If no, I would assume the fridge is pull moisture out of the dough and you are getting a cracker like effect. 


 

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