Author Topic: Can Pan and Neopolitan use same dough formulation?  (Read 315 times)

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Offline BillyCorgan

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Can Pan and Neopolitan use same dough formulation?
« on: February 11, 2014, 12:03:02 AM »
Hi there - this is probably a simple question to anyone with pizza dough experience.

Is the major difference between a thick pan style pizza and thinner neopolitan in the dough formulation or in how it's stretched and pulled?  Basically I'm curious if it's possible to use the same formulation for these two crusts or if they must be made separately.

Thanks,
Billy Corgan


Offline dmckean44

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Re: Can Pan and Neopolitan use same dough formulation?
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2014, 12:22:07 AM »
Probably, but it may not be ideal.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 10:43:41 AM by dmckean44 »

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Can Pan and Neopolitan use same dough formulation?
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2014, 05:03:24 AM »
Hi there - this is probably a simple question to anyone with pizza dough experience.

Is the major difference between a thick pan style pizza and thinner neopolitan in the dough formulation or in how it's stretched and pulled?  Basically I'm curious if it's possible to use the same formulation for these two crusts or if they must be made separately.

Thanks,
Billy Corgan

It is an interesting question and the answer is not cut and dry. If you are talking about "thin crust" or NY Style pizza (not to be confused with Neapolitan pizza), then yes, you could easily make a dough that would serve both as a pan pizza and a thin crust or NY style.

John

Offline Donjo911

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Re: Can Pan and Neopolitan use same dough formulation?
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2014, 07:46:28 PM »
Just in case it's useful, I was recently reading on the forum about Greek Pizza; then Chicago, and then Bar pizza.  It made me hungry.  I make dough every week for 4 to 5 pizzas as I work to find 'my' perfect utility dough. It seemed to me that in some of the aforementioned types one of the biggest factors was the amount of oil in the dough. I typically stay below 2% but I thought I could really oil up a dark 9 x 14 steel pan that I have and work some oil into the dough - just to see what happens.  Below is a picture of an 8 minute NY (sort of) pie and using effectively the same dough a thick pan pizza.  It was awesome. It was much more airy and not bready. Rather it was very light.  I suppose it depends what you are shooting for but in terms of getting two different things from the same dough - you can.  Oh, the same dough also made quick buns for some home ground burgers that same week.  Happy baking.
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