Author Topic: DKM's Thin Crust?  (Read 556 times)

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Offline PizzaEater

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DKM's Thin Crust?
« on: February 13, 2014, 11:58:50 AM »
A few questions regarding DKM's Thin Crust.

1. I question the need for a cutter pan, why not a cookie sheet? Or just baking directly on a stone or steel with a sheet of parchment paper?
2. I'll be baking at 7,200', since the hydration is so low does anyone have any thoughts on reducing the amount of yeast, I know the issues with high altitude. I'm wondering how the low hydration might affect things in conjunction with the low hydration? DKM's call's for 1.2%, I'm guessing reduce that by half. Thoughts?

Thanks All
« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 12:02:18 PM by PizzaEater »


Offline PizzaGarage

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Re: DKM's Thin Crust?
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2014, 12:25:23 PM »
You can certainly bake that formulation on a stone.  The cutter provides the curled edge but you can do either.  If you put semolina or light corn meal on your paddle (if you have one) you can slide the pizza off directly onto the stone and eliminate the parchment paper.

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: DKM's Thin Crust?
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2014, 06:38:59 PM »
Cutter pan on oven rack vs stone = 2 different pizzas.
I prefer the pan ...to me that is old school Chicago thin pizza. Much softer and tender. But there are many, many places that go with the stone and that's a mighty fine pizza too...just different.  :chef:

Bob
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 12:51:18 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline PizzaGarage

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Re: DKM's Thin Crust?
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2014, 11:25:37 AM »
There is little difference in the final crust: cutter pan vs directly on stone if the cutter is placed on the preheated stone.  The same amount of heat energy is applied, in this case, to the metal.  Heat up time on thin aluminum is rapid, a slight variance would be the pan provides a slightly smoother crust bottom and less spotting.   

Online Aimless Ryan

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Re: DKM's Thin Crust?
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2014, 04:07:32 PM »
There is little difference in the final crust: cutter pan vs directly on stone if the cutter is placed on the preheated stone.  The same amount of heat energy is applied, in this case, to the metal.  Heat up time on thin aluminum is rapid, a slight variance would be the pan provides a slightly smoother crust bottom and less spotting.

I would expect a pretty big difference between pizzas baked on a cutter pan (on a hot stone) and pizzas baked directly on stone, and my experience agrees. That is, there is certainly a big difference in bake time (four minutes or so?). Honestly, I'm not sure I can say I've noticed much of a taste or texture difference between pizzas baked in each respective manner, but I have to figure there is some kind of noticeable difference. It's hard to say because I've never really done both side by side. Rather, my Tommy's cracker style pizzas have gradually evolved from pan-baked to stone-baked.

I may try baking a cracker style pizza directly on stone and then baking another identical pizza on a pan just to see for myself.

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: DKM's Thin Crust?
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2014, 04:32:52 PM »
I would expect a pretty big difference between pizzas baked on a cutter pan (on a hot stone) and pizzas baked directly on stone, and my experience agrees. That is, there is certainly a big difference in bake time (four minutes or so?). Honestly, I'm not sure I can say I've noticed much of a taste or texture difference between pizzas baked in each respective manner, but I have to figure there is some kind of noticeable difference. It's hard to say because I've never really done both side by side. Rather, my Tommy's cracker style pizzas have gradually evolved from pan-baked to stone-baked.

I may try baking a cracker style pizza directly on stone and then baking another identical pizza on a pan just to see for myself.
There is a big difference....but I believe it stems from the operators heat/temp level on his oven. The cutter pan on a steel deck is ran at a much lower temp than the guy running pies directly on a stone deck....this is from my observations/working in pizza joints around Chicago. Just depends on what outcome you're wanting. Yet, even still, if you did the 2 side by side at same temps your going to see a difference as Ryan indicates...

Bob
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 04:34:56 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Online Aimless Ryan

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Re: DKM's Thin Crust?
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2014, 05:19:45 PM »
Yeah, I'd think when you bake on any kind of pan, it takes at least a few minutes for the pan to reach the same temperature as the stone. At the same time, the pan is taking heat from the stone. Especially cutter pans, which are pretty thick and very dense.

So basically, the way I see it, when you bake on a cutter pan, the first few minutes of baking is essentially a form of proofing the dough in the pan. Which means such a pizza will be more airy and a little thicker than the same pizza baked directly on stone.

I've gotten to the point where I always prefer to bake without a pan if possible. Some styles just don't work that way, though, because certain pizzas have to take the shape of the pan. Like deep dish, stuffed, and PH thin. You can't make any of those styles without a pan.


 

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