Author Topic: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?  (Read 789 times)

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Offline prophecy

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How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« on: February 18, 2014, 09:47:03 PM »
I'm currently using a 12" round steel grate from an electric grill and wonder how a stone would affect the crust differently? I'm getting nice browning and crispness all over but wondering if a stone would improve it further...This is in a small old oven that gets pretty darn hot, my gauge stops at 600 degrees and it'll bury the needle...

I'd post a pic, but I still need to build my post count haha, I'll post a pic ASAP ;D


Offline Tampa

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2014, 08:46:57 AM »
Love to see a picture.
Dave

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2014, 09:13:32 AM »
A steel grate doesn't have much capacity for storing latent heat, instead it allows the pizza to bake by allowing the heat to pass right through it to the dough. A solid stone or heave steel deck can store latent heat and quickly transfer that heat to the pizza that has been placed on it so you actually end up getting a better bake if done right. Another way to look at it is like this;
You can put your hand inside of a 600F oven without getting burned...I do it all the time, just don't touch anything while you're in there.
Using that same oven and temperature, put a solid stone deck in it and allow it to fully heat to oven temperature, now if you were to touch that stone you would instantly get a burn. This is rate of heat transfer. Air is a poor transfer medium while steel, stone, water or oil are all much better and a lot more efficient. A couple of things that need to be considered with a solid deck, it must be sufficiently heavy to be able to store sufficient latent heat to provide heat to the bottom of the pizza during the entire baking cycle, and you must allow sufficient preheat time to allow the surface to absorb as much heat as it can (this could take the better part of an hour).
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline prophecy

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2014, 03:20:32 PM »
Very interesting, thank you!

So the pizza would probably take less time using a proper stone or steel? At the moment, the last one took about 8 minutes...Now this makes me wonder just how much mass is needed to store an adequate amount of heat for the pizza to fully cook...

I have access to flat stones used for a walkway that seem to be some kind of red hard sandstone or sedimentary stone...they are about 1.5" thick and would be a hefty energy storage...but I'm assuming only certain types of stone is useable?

 

Offline Tampa

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2014, 04:01:20 PM »
Very interesting, thank you!

So the pizza would probably take less time using a proper stone or steel? At the moment, the last one took about 8 minutes...Now this makes me wonder just how much mass is needed to store an adequate amount of heat for the pizza to fully cook...

I have access to flat stones used for a walkway that seem to be some kind of red hard sandstone or sedimentary stone...they are about 1.5" thick and would be a hefty energy storage...but I'm assuming only certain types of stone is useable?
Dr Tom - thanks for keeping this out of the mud.  I was imagining something more exotic than a grill rack but that intellectual pursuit is best left in a dream at this point.

Prophecy - "less time" with a stone or steel is correct.  I may be getting this order wrong, but I'm confident somebody will correct me (credit to smart forum members).  Generally speaking the more conductive the surface, the faster the bottom of the pizza will cook.  So going from slowest to fastest is fire brick, fibrament, cordierite, stoapstone, and steel.  Do a search on these terms and you will learn about the differences.  If you want a quick summary: fire brick is common in Wood Fired Ovens, Cordierite is common in gas and commercial electric ovens, steel is sometimes used in home ovens.

Dave

Offline Mmmph

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2014, 04:06:47 PM »
Cooking on a grate? No thanks.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline JD

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2014, 04:09:31 PM »
Cooking on a grate? No thanks.

That picture made me laugh... looks like an atomic pizza bomb went off in your oven.
Josh

Offline prophecy

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2014, 04:28:40 PM »
Thank you Dave, I'm curious what type of device you had in mind? I will do more research and figure out what I would like.

Haha, nuclear lunch...notice the spacing is much closer on my grate though at .5" so I haven't had that issue... so far
« Last Edit: February 19, 2014, 04:33:20 PM by prophecy »

Offline Tampa

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2014, 04:34:46 PM »
Cooking on a grate? No thanks.
Dang Mmmph!  That's my dream, right there.  I like that crispier cheese. :)
Dave

Offline pythonic

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Re: How is Stone Better than Steel Grate?
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2014, 09:44:16 AM »
That picture made me laugh... looks like an atomic pizza bomb went off in your oven.

That's why those frozen pizzas have the words "do not thaw all over them"
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.