Author Topic: How to season baking steel  (Read 592 times)

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Offline luanna

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How to season baking steel
« on: February 24, 2014, 12:38:07 PM »
Hi, I am thinking about buying a steel locally and Scott gave me some great ideas. Now my dilema is how do I start to use this steel. It must be cleaned and seasoned. Is there a proper procedure. Please help. Thx


Offline mbrulato

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Re: How to season baking steel
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2014, 12:45:12 PM »
No dilemma, Luanna.  If you source your steel locally, most likely it will have some mill scale or rust on it.  Some members on the forum paid a little extra to have a matte finish put on it, but that was not available to me.  Depending on how much you may need to soak the steel in vinegar for awhile.

When I bought mine, I scrubbed the heck out of it with sandpaper first, then steel wool.  Then I washed it a few times with a vinegar and water solution.  Then with soap and water.  After rinsing and drying it, I applied a very thin layer of vegetable oil to it using a microfiber cloth.  I placed it into the oven and seasoned it at 550 degrees Fahrenheit for an hour.  It was ready to use after that.  Good luck!

Here's a picture of mine

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=27552.msg278885#msg278885
« Last Edit: February 24, 2014, 12:47:52 PM by mbrulato »
Mary Ann

scott123

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Re: How to season baking steel
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2014, 07:24:28 PM »
Luanna, I think the steps to take to prepare steel plate really boil down to the condition of the plate you buy.  Mary Ann's plate was in pretty good condition, so she didn't have to take it down to the metal with a long vinegar soak.  If you have a good amount of rust, though, or the mill scale keeps coming off on your hands after multiple washings, then a couple days in vinegar is a good idea. On mine, the mill scale seemed very stable and durable, almost like a powder coating, so I left it on.

As far as seasoning goes... from a non stick, food safety or anti-corrosive perspective, you don't really need it. If you've removed all the mill scale and are down to bare metal, an infrared thermometer will tend to have issues taking readings with something that reflective, so an extremely thin layer of oil (any oil) to provide a tiny amount of color will give you more reliable IR thermometer readings, but that's the only reason I can see for seasoning.

Offline luanna

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Re: How to season baking steel
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2014, 01:48:39 AM »
Thanks Scott, I'll let you know how I fare and send some pictures, However  this will take several days before I can do this. Thanks for all your help.


 

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