Author Topic: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....  (Read 1246 times)

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Offline sandsman1949

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To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« on: February 25, 2014, 06:59:01 AM »
I've made countless gallons of pasta sauce over the years and, needless to say, always simmered it for hours. I'm new to pizza making (will be doing it on a large scale in a concession stand on the Jersey Shore this summer) and I see on this site that many suggest Not cooking the pizza sauce. Any feedback on this subject will be greatly appreciated.


Offline jeff v

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2014, 08:51:38 AM »
I've made countless gallons of pasta sauce over the years and, needless to say, always simmered it for hours. I'm new to pizza making (will be doing it on a large scale in a concession stand on the Jersey Shore this summer) and I see on this site that many suggest Not cooking the pizza sauce. Any feedback on this subject will be greatly appreciated.

What kind of pizza are you going to make?

Personally I am burnt out on the long cooked sauces for pizza or pasta, so I use an uncooked or slightly cooked sauce. Have you had uncooked sauce? t cooks on the pizza, just for a shorter time so it ends up tasting more fresh and light IMO.
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Online TXCraig1

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2014, 10:03:59 PM »
I don't cook the sauce for any pies I make (NP, NY, DS, or Sicilian). I do cook pasta sauce though with lots of ham hocks or trotters.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline jsaras

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2014, 11:01:13 PM »
Do a search for "microwave extraction".  Member November provided an interesting alternative to cooking pizza sauce that involves nuking just the spices. 
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Offline Jackitup

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2014, 03:25:42 AM »
I do cook pasta sauce though with lots of ham hocks or trotters.

YUM :drool:
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Offline Chaze215

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2014, 07:03:54 AM »
I agree with Craig. I never cook my sauce for my pies either.
Sands, where is your concession stand going to be on the Jersey Shore?
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2014, 03:14:08 PM »
Don't you dare cook that sauce....besides, you'll already have enough work on your hands.  ;)
Good luck this Summer!

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Offline mkevenson

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2014, 04:01:03 PM »
Find really good tasting tomatoes, crush and use. No cooking , please!
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2014, 08:02:35 PM »
I've made countless gallons of pasta sauce over the years and, needless to say, always simmered it for hours. I'm new to pizza making (will be doing it on a large scale in a concession stand on the Jersey Shore this summer) and I see on this site that many suggest Not cooking the pizza sauce. Any feedback on this subject will be greatly appreciated.
sandman1949,

There are some pizza operators who do cook their pizza sauces. From my reading over the years, including at the PMQ Think Tank, the sauces that are most often cooked are those that are based on tomato paste or inexpensive tomatoes that might benefit from the addition of things like sugar, herbs and spices and then cooked. For the better quality tomatoes, like fresh pack tomatoes from producers like Stanislaus, Escalon and San Benito, it is uncommon to see those tomato products cooked, as I noted recently in the second and third paragraphs of Reply 118 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30096.msg303512;topicseen#msg303512. The same generally goes for San Marzano tomatoes.

For some additional insight on the matter of cooking or not cooking pizza sauces, see the PMQTT threads at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=10188&hilit=36ec9bc0b5effc22694c898d8641428e, http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=9487&hilit=36ec9bc0b5effc22694c898d8641428e and http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7216&hilit=.

To the above, I would add that there are some types of pizza sauces that can be cooked, and done so successfully. For example, several years ago, as I was passing through the kitchen area of DiFara's on my way to the restroom, I saw a pot of sauce being cooked on the stove. I asked the fellow in the kitchen (I believe that it was Dom DeMarco's son) where that sauce was to be used. He said it was for the Sicilian pizzas, which were a big favorite among many of Dom's customers. As for Dom's other pizzas, which used a combination of high quality San Marzano tomatoes (DOP Vantia's) and fresh tomatoes, the sauces were not cooked.

In your case, you may want to assess what kinds of pizzas you plan to make, who your customers will be and what they might be willing to pay for the pizzas, and select the types and brands and price points of tomato products that might best meet that profile and demographics.

Peter

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2014, 08:20:40 PM »
I do both, and if I was running a pizza joint that was not WFO Neapolitan I would mildly cook my sauce, primarily to maintain consistency.  Just keep it below 200 degrees.


Offline Auralnauts

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2014, 02:22:26 PM »
I cook my pizza sauce only because it is made from fresh ingredients. If my sauce was not cooked my oven would be a mess. Once the tomato sauce is heated, the tomatoes begin to release moisture which means a hell of a lot of water. I think many members here do not cook their sauce because they use at least 1 ingredient in their sauce that is canned, which is usually the tomatoes. Where are you going to be at the Jersey Shore? I might visit and eat some pizza while I'm knee deep in snow.
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2014, 03:33:31 PM »
Usually I don't cook my sauce. Occasionally I do cook it briefly if it has ingredients other than tomatoes.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2014, 08:41:35 PM »
I cooked my sauce for years and then several years ago I became very involved in searching out the best tomato products I could find. Today I use tomatoes straight from the can on my pizza, but if I were limited to lower quality tomatoes I would advocate cooked sauce.

Offline Old Red

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2014, 10:20:29 AM »
I don't cook the sauce for any pies I make (NP, NY, DS, or Sicilian). I do cook pasta sauce though with lots of ham hocks or trotters.

Trotters? I am only familiar with the equine definition . . .

Offline Jackitup

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2014, 02:38:50 AM »
Trotters? I am only familiar with the equine definition . . .

http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2002/02/pork-hocks-shanks-jowls-trotters.html

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/10/momofuku-bo-ssam-hocks-and-trotters.html

http://foodetective.wordpress.com/tag/food/

Fine, High, Dining in my book.....Living high on the hog???? Keep it, I'll eat better food with the poor folks that figured it out!!! nuff said :drool:

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Offline thezaman

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2014, 06:30:48 PM »
I am going to go against the masses and recommend you cook your sauce,just enough to blend you spices . since very few do this you will have a unique taste that is a little different from the norm. try it.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2014, 10:22:02 PM »
Exit Sandman....before he could even tell us what type of pizza he was gonna dealio.  ::)

Bob
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Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2014, 05:18:44 AM »
sandman1949,

There are some pizza operators who do cook their pizza sauces. From my reading over the years, including at the PMQ Think Tank, the sauces that are most often cooked are those that are based on tomato paste or inexpensive tomatoes that might benefit from the addition of things like sugar, herbs and spices and then cooked. For the better quality tomatoes, like fresh pack tomatoes from producers like Stanislaus, Escalon and San Benito, it is uncommon to see those tomato products cooked, as I noted recently in the second and third paragraphs of Reply 118 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30096.msg303512;topicseen#msg303512. The same generally goes for San Marzano tomatoes.

For some additional insight on the matter of cooking or not cooking pizza sauces, see the PMQTT threads at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=10188&hilit=36ec9bc0b5effc22694c898d8641428e, http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=9487&hilit=36ec9bc0b5effc22694c898d8641428e and http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7216&hilit=.

To the above, I would add that there are some types of pizza sauces that can be cooked, and done so successfully. For example, several years ago, as I was passing through the kitchen area of DiFara's on my way to the restroom, I saw a pot of sauce being cooked on the stove. I asked the fellow in the kitchen (I believe that it was Dom DeMarco's son) where that sauce was to be used. He said it was for the Sicilian pizzas, which were a big favorite among many of Dom's customers. As for Dom's other pizzas, which used a combination of high quality San Marzano tomatoes (DOP Vantia's) and fresh tomatoes, the sauces were not cooked.

In your case, you may want to assess what kinds of pizzas you plan to make, who your customers will be and what they might be willing to pay for the pizzas, and select the types and brands and price points of tomato products that might best meet that profile and demographics.

Peter

i stand to be corrected here pete, but former readings taught that anything put in a can to be sold in the US market has to be heated to a certain temperature before the can is sealed and vacuum results
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2014, 08:33:41 AM »
i stand to be corrected here pete, but former readings taught that anything put in a can to be sold in the US market has to be heated to a certain temperature before the can is sealed and vacuum results
Jon,

What you say is generally correct but there are differences in how the tomatoes are cooked. For example, if you go to the Stanislaus website, where their fresh pack tomato processing is discussed, you will see some of those differences. For example, see the comparison flow diagrams at http://www.stanislaus.com/products/not-from-concentrate/process_comparison. There is also further discussion at http://www.stanislaus.com/products/not-from-concentrate/consequences_of_rmfg and at http://www.stanislaus.com/company/stanislaus-difference (note, in particular, the topic "Time and Temperature are the enemies of fresh tomato flavor!"). If you use the search feature at the Stanislaus website, you will find still other discussions on how things are done at Stanislaus.

I also recall that many years ago Big Dave Ostrander wrote an article at PMQ on how tomatoes are processed by Stanislaus and Escalon. The article is dated but it still contains a lot of useful and informative material on how fresh pack tomatoes, and other tomatoes, are processed, from field to can. The article is reproduced at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=605.msg5593;topicseen#msg5593.

Peter

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: To COOK or NOT to Cook- the sauce that is....
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2014, 02:51:07 PM »
They also cook under vacuum to keep the temperatures below the magic 200 degrees.


 

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