Author Topic: Need some advice on Diastatic Malt  (Read 489 times)

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Offline Wazza McG

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Need some advice on Diastatic Malt
« on: February 25, 2014, 04:59:07 PM »
Hi,

I have read a fair bit on diastatic malt and its benefits.  I was hoping to gain users experience with the stuff.

Primarily, I was hoping they could fill the following gaps on my knowledge and hear from their experiences.

1.  Could diastatic malt be used in a extended autolyse, flour & water only [overnight+] ?

2.  Could diastaic malt be used successfully with minimal yeast with an extended cold fermantaion [24 hrs+]

3.  Have you ever used diastatic malt in your sourdough starter?

I will probably test a bit myself in the near future - I just wanted to welcome your thoughts.

Cheers,
Wazza McG
Fair Dinkum - you want more Pizza!  Crikey ! I've run out out them prawny thingymebobs again!


Offline Johnny the Gent

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Re: Need some advice on Diastatic Malt
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2014, 03:44:52 PM »
I came across your post while using the search feature (trying to nail down a NY formula that calls for diastatic malt), and would also be interested in hearing what experienced malt users have to say - especially in regards to your first 2 questions. 

Hi,

I have read a fair bit on diastatic malt and its benefits.  I was hoping to gain users experience with the stuff.

Primarily, I was hoping they could fill the following gaps on my knowledge and hear from their experiences.

1.  Could diastatic malt be used in a extended autolyse, flour & water only [overnight+] ?

2.  Could diastaic malt be used successfully with minimal yeast with an extended cold fermantaion [24 hrs+]

3.  Have you ever used diastatic malt in your sourdough starter?

I will probably test a bit myself in the near future - I just wanted to welcome your thoughts.

Cheers,
Wazza McG
Il miglior fabbro

Offline petef

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Re: Need some advice on Diastatic Malt
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2014, 01:14:44 AM »
I just started using Diastatic Malt powder for baking Kaiser rolls, but I've never used it for pizza dough.
What benefits or characteristics are you expecting to obtain by using Diastatic Malt?

For my Kaiser Rolls, the recipe called out for Malt Powder and initially, I didn't have any, so I substituted the water ingredient with Budwieser beer which gave great results in flavor. After that, I found some Diastatic Malt powder on Amazon and tried it along with the beer. I didn't detect much difference in taste, but the texture changed very slightly by giving the finished rolls a bit more rise and airyness.

---pete---

Offline Wazza McG

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Re: Need some advice on Diastatic Malt
« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2014, 03:13:28 AM »
Diastatic Malt is used to help convert the starch found in flour to sugars that are useable by the yeast over an extended ferment.  It is used to give improved rise, softer crumb and more crust colour development without the need for adding sugar. 

When the amylase breaks down starch down into sugars, it helps feed the yeast and aids in browning. The proteases break the proteins in the flour down into amino acids, which also spurs yeast growth, as well as improving the flavor and aroma in breads.

 I have also found that the dough becomes more elastic to handle.  What has spurred me to use it was its contribution to flavour and aroma - those wonderful acids.
Fair Dinkum - you want more Pizza!  Crikey ! I've run out out them prawny thingymebobs again!

Offline petef

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Re: Need some advice on Diastatic Malt
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2014, 03:09:39 AM »
Diastatic Malt is used to help convert the starch found in flour to sugars that are useable by the yeast over an extended ferment.  It is used to give improved rise, softer crumb and more crust colour development without the need for adding sugar. 

When the amylase breaks down starch down into sugars, it helps feed the yeast and aids in browning. The proteases break the proteins in the flour down into amino acids, which also spurs yeast growth, as well as improving the flavor and aroma in breads.

 I have also found that the dough becomes more elastic to handle.  What has spurred me to use it was its contribution to flavour and aroma - those wonderful acids.

Great explanation! I just might try a combo of Diastatic Malt and Budweiser beer in my next dough recipe. If I do, I'll post a pic here. Thanks!  ---pete---