Author Topic: Complete recipes?  (Read 2494 times)

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Offline enchant

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Complete recipes?
« on: April 11, 2006, 08:48:08 AM »
I've been looking through this part of the forum for a good sauce recipe, but I can only find discussions on San Marzano tomatoes.  Are there any good sauce recipes on the site?  Thanks.
--pat--


Offline ihavezippers

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Re: Complete recipes?
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2006, 02:41:36 AM »
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2527.0.html
This is for starters.  There are many many more hidden in the catacombs of the forum.  You just have to search them out.

Offline enchant

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Re: Complete recipes?
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2006, 06:35:26 AM »
Thanks.  I have found a few others that I'd like to try.  One of the main problems is that pizza is such a subjective thing.  I guess I'm not really looking for a "good" recipe.  I'm looking for a recipe that I will like, and that might be difficult to find.
--pat--

Offline Fio

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Re: Complete recipes?
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2006, 10:19:18 AM »
Thanks.  I have found a few others that I'd like to try.  One of the main problems is that pizza is such a subjective thing.  I guess I'm not really looking for a "good" recipe.  I'm looking for a recipe that I will like, and that might be difficult to find.

Try this:

1) Try to identify WHAT you like about a particular sauce: texture, saltiness, spice, herbs, etc. 

Herbs: oregano (turkish OR Mexican), basil (fresh or dry), thyme, majoram, etc.

Garlic: fresh (crushed or chopped), powder, granulated?
Pepper: Black, white, crushed red, cayenne?
Oil: Does the sauce have oil (i.e. is it "orange" instead of "red?")  Olive, soybean?
Sugar/sweetness?
Saltiness?
Vinegar?
Cheese?  Parm or Romano?


2) Next, decide on a tomato base that you like: Crushed, puree, whole chopped, etc.  If you like crushed, try several brands.

3) Obtain a 28-oz can of the tomatoes you like and experiment with different combinations of spices/herbs.  Obtain a dozen small plastic containers.  In each, prepare a "micro batch" with a given combination of ingredients.  Make several.  TAKE DETAILED NOTES.

4) LET THEM SIT OVERNIGHT IN THE FRIDGE TO MELD THE FLAVORS.

5) The next day, taste and compare.   If you find one or two you like, repeat the exercise, but tweak the ingredient proportions until you get what you want.
Since joining this forum, I've begun using words like "autolyze" and have become anal about baker's percents.  My dough is forever changed.

Offline enchant

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Re: Complete recipes?
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2006, 10:26:07 AM »
Sounds like good advice.

There is a pizza joint near me that is wildly popular with the local crowd.  There is something about the sauce that everyone loves.  I recently ordered a sauce-only pizza to go and scraped the sauce into a plastic container.  I've been tasting it, trying to determine what the flavor is, but I can't figure it out.  There's something very different in there that has a very strong and unique flavor - not the usual basil/oregano type of spice.  Perhaps it's a combination of two herbs like fennel and something.  I wish I had a better knowledge of herbs and what they taste like.
--pat--

Offline Lydia

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Re: Complete recipes?
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2006, 03:20:15 PM »
Hi Enchant

If you follow what fio is suggesting you WILL develop you sense of taste, and will begin to identify flavors in your favorite foods.

Fennel is one of the herbs that comes to my mind first. It can have a bit of an ansie/licorice flavor, but is a common seasoning in pepperoni and pizza sausage. Also as Fio mentions: thyme and marjorum, both have very distinct flavors.

On the other end of things; there are two flavoring agents that can make a big difference but can go un-noticed. First is Flat-leafed/Italian parsley and the other being celery, either fresh cooked or as seeds or celery salt.

non-herb flavorings are
* olive oil, the flavors vary from type and brand. Rich and nutty or beefy to hardly any flavor at all)
* The use of fresh verses dehyrated galic is very significant.
* The other is adding a dry wine, for more authentic Italian style sauce.

Hope this helps and good luck on your sauce.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline enchant

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Re: Complete recipes?
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2006, 05:09:46 PM »
Lydia,

Thanks - that *does* help - I appreciate the info.

Over the weekend, I made my favorite minestrone soup.  One of the primary ingredients is sweet Italian sausage, and I think that the primary spice that gives it its sweetness was in this sauce.  Might this be fennel?
--pat--

Offline PizzaDanPizzaMan

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Re: Complete recipes?
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2006, 11:57:54 AM »
Indeed fennel is the herb most associated with Italian sausage. However most would say its flavor is characteristic of licorice and I don't think it is what gives sweet italian sausage it's sweetness. I believe "sweet" Italian sausage is simply the "other" choice over "hot" Italian sausage, In other words, the same recipe without red pepper flakes. My local Italian deli sells their sausage in four different versions. Regular (which is what you could refer to as "sweet" or "mild", same stuff), hot, garlic and finally a "no fennel" version which in my opinion is not Italian sausage at all. I only recently fell upon the garlic version and let me tell you it is awesome when used for a deep dish Chicago style pie. ;D ;D

Dan