Author Topic: Making my own Mozzarella  (Read 801 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline JohnnyQuest86

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4
  • Location: United States
  • I Love Pizza!
Making my own Mozzarella
« on: February 26, 2014, 01:01:42 AM »
 ???
So I am wanting to open a Pizza Restaurant and bar. I have been researching and have taken a class on making mozzarella cheese. It seems an easy enough venture, so I was wondering why it seems that no one does it. Is fresh mozzarella not appropriate for Pizza? I feel like as long as you start with a full fat milk that it should melt properly.

So I was wondering, beyond the obvious fact that it takes some time to make fresh mozz, are there any other reasons it is not more commonplace?

The first thing that came to mind is that it may just be more expensive to make your own. If this is the case, is it due to the cost of labor, or is it just that the amount of cheese/gallon of milk just isn't near competitive with what you could get from a mass producer.

Is anyone currently doing this in their restaurant, and if so, have there been major hurdles?

Thanks,
Pizza Newb


Offline Pastaking

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 67
  • Location: New York
  • take it easy
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2014, 09:17:46 AM »
fresh mozzarella is for quick bakes such as a Neopolitan pizza where the crust bakes quicker than the cheese can melt. If you use fresh mozzarella on a NY style pie it melts into goo and burns before the crust is done. you need a low moisture cheese, which can handle a high heat for a bit longer period of time before it burns. Plus the fresh mozzarella has alot of water in it and will saturate your crust once you slice it.... messy. Experiment with different cheese and you will see what I mean.

Offline Bjorn74

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2014, 08:38:50 PM »
The pasteurization equipment for commercial cheese making is expensive and introduces a whole new set of inspections and regulations. Most artisan cheese makers won't even touch the fresh cheeses (<90day aged) like mozzarella. If you see someone "making mozzarella", they're buying curd and stretching it which doesn't really cost less. It _can_ taste better, but depends on the person doing it.

Offline JohnnyQuest86

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4
  • Location: United States
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2014, 05:34:25 PM »
Maybe I am mistaken, but I was under the impression that I can use rennin and citric acid to turn Pasteurized milk(so long as it is not ultra high temperature pasteurized)  into curd with relative ease. I have not yet tested the amount of curd I can get and if it is financially reasonable, but assuming it is, will this pass whatever codes I would need to be able to use this cheese in a restaurant setting, or is there some further steps that would need to be taken?

Offline dmckean44

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 225
  • Age: 36
  • Location: San Diego
  • pizza pizza
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2014, 08:17:16 PM »
You'll need to source raw milk from a local dairy. Pasteurized milk won't come together as smoothly and you'll end up with a cheese inferior to what you can buy. Plus it makes no sense to buy already processed milk at retail prices. You won't need any milk pasteurization equipment or anything like that but depending on where you live you may need a cheesemakers license.

Offline Bjorn74

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2014, 08:54:31 AM »
If you sell mozzarella in any form, it has to be pasteurized. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=133.155

So, you buy gallons of pasteurized milk at Aldi, say. That's $2.69 today. Each gallon is about half a pound of cheese. So, $5.38 per pound plus labor, acid, enzymes, salt and materials. Belioigoso curd is $3.02 at my Restaurant Depot.

The big thing is the health department. Milk gets special treatment. They may require some milk handlers permit to make cheese. We have those in Indiana. I'm sure it can be done and I'd like to do it, but mozzarella is a lot more difficult to license than aged cheeses.

Offline mbrulato

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 969
  • Location: NJ
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2014, 09:58:13 AM »
Sorry to hijack this thread, but could you tell me what brands of mozzarella curd they sell at RD?  My BIL is going to show me how to make it and I'd like to buy the curd there.

Can you recommend what brands are the best?  I've heard that Polly-O brand adds a whitener to theirs and I want to avoid that.... 

TIA
Mary Ann

Offline Bjorn74

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2014, 03:34:19 PM »
Right now, my RD only has BelGioioso. I've seen a couple others there but don't recall a brand. Their inventory changes from region to region. I can't get a 00 flour without buying a pallet. Other areas you can have a choice.

Offline mbrulato

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 969
  • Location: NJ
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2014, 04:51:03 PM »
Right now, my RD only has BelGioioso. I've seen a couple others there but don't recall a brand. Their inventory changes from region to region. I can't get a 00 flour without buying a pallet. Other areas you can have a choice.

Thanks, Ben.  Do you like the Belgioso curd?
Mary Ann

Offline Bjorn74

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 7
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2014, 04:59:32 PM »
I didn't have time to use any curd last year. I want to get a cheese maker here to do it, but the only place that will touch mozzarella wanted to charge me $.50/lb ABOVE their retail price. There are some hobby farms that are milking for home use. I can't use anything they produce until they're licensed.


Offline thezaman

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1908
  • Age: 61
  • Location: ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
    • lorenzos pizza
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2014, 08:01:32 PM »
 i do not think the yield of curd per gallon of milk is very high. it would be extremely expensive,and also very hard to get consistent results.the use of curd offers a realy consistent product that you can customize for your needs. you can adjust the salt levels even adjust the texture. there is a lot you can do with curd.i know  places that stretch appetizers to order from curd so you get that wet milky warm fresh stretched cheese.all of those textures make it a premium appetizer that a customer is willing to pay for.
 i use curd for my mobile wood fired and there is a nice saving over buying it in finished balls. with labor i save 1.40 per pound.  polly-o uses a whitener where grande doesn't, i use grande my buddy uses polly-o and he swears by it. i have a dvd that you are welcome to on the stretching method PM me if you want one
 

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12833
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2014, 09:44:30 PM »
Maybe I am mistaken, but I was under the impression that I can use rennin and citric acid to turn Pasteurized milk(so long as it is not ultra high temperature pasteurized)  into curd with relative ease. I have not yet tested the amount of curd I can get and if it is financially reasonable, but assuming it is, will this pass whatever codes I would need to be able to use this cheese in a restaurant setting, or is there some further steps that would need to be taken?

I've never heard of this being done in a pizzeria nor can I think of a single reason why you would want to. It would be a nightmare for several reasons - many mentioned here already. Buy curd.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Dorkmeat

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 28
  • Location: United States
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2014, 02:02:15 PM »
I've never heard of this being done in a pizzeria nor can I think of a single reason why you would want to. It would be a nightmare for several reasons - many mentioned here already. Buy curd.

So the normal process for making fresh mozz in a pizzeria is starting from curd and not milk?

Online Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10808
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2014, 10:57:07 PM »
So the normal process for making fresh mozz in a pizzeria is starting from curd and not milk?
Dude, did you read the post you just quoted?
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline moose13

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 666
  • Location: Wyoming
Re: Making my own Mozzarella
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2014, 11:33:43 PM »
I made this and a couple others.
It was decent, did not melt well, flavor was ok.
Lots of work for what it was. Have not made it again.


 

pizzapan