Author Topic: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?  (Read 634 times)

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Offline UrbanNoir75

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California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« on: February 26, 2014, 07:30:02 PM »
I'm writing a Yelp review about a mediocre shop in California, and one of the things that bugged me was the light, spongy crust. As if it were more air and water than flour. It's become ubiquitous in California chain restaurants and take-out shops like Domino's and Pizza Hut, most notably Domino's, where all of the ingredients are of low quality.

The only redeeming factor here might be if this shop were to bill itself as "California style" pizza, and the dough/crust was intended to be this way. When you read about California style pizza, it's usually distinguished by the exotic or experimental toppings, but in a few cases (here for example), I've seen California-style crust described as light and fluffy. Is that to say Domino's has distinctly "California-style" crust? Are we talking about different things?

Also, how would fluffy crust be made? For example, how would Domino's make their garbagy crust so "garbage?" Is it in fact more water or air?

Worth mentioning is this shop I'm reviewing in question (not Domino's) has three dough types: thin crust, regular crust, and thick crust. I picked regular.
“The cheaper the crook, the gaudier the patter.” -- Sam Spade - The Maltese Falcon


Offline Doughboy20

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Re: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2014, 02:41:51 AM »
The ubiquitous crust you speak of is NOT a sign of California pizza, its a result of fast food chains cost cutting methods.   Domino's is no more authentic or Representative of California pizza then Taco Bell is to Mexican food.  Pizza in California is getting better and better, but not the delivery kind, it's garbage.  There are some great pizza places in San Francisco like Pizzaiolo's, Tony's Pizza Napoletana,  and Los Angles there is Mozza which is owned by Chef Mario Batali and La Brea Bakery Chef Nancy Silverton or in Long Beach Micheal's Pizza winner of Zagat. 2013

I am not an expert on crust but from what I gather, they do several things that are cost cutting that make it so spongy.  Without knowing the recipe I cant really comment but I would guess they use some oil in the dough which helps for browning but kill the gluten... so more dense crust.  They also use minimum wage part time workers so let's just say they do not know how to really push out the dough correctly.  And probably most important is the oven.  The best pizzas are made in a wood fired oven at high heat baking in about 2 minutes, Domino's uses some kind of conveyer system and therefore the heat is probably a lot lower so the dough dose not get the big blast of heat it needs to puff up in the oven before the structure sets.  Ergo, thick bready crust.  I would not be surprised at all if they use dough conditioners and other chemical so it can be made in huge quantities and stored for long periods of time. 

Offline jsaras

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Re: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2014, 10:44:43 AM »
The distictive aspects of CPK's crust are the use of all purpose flour and a LOT of oil.  Here's the formulation that I found several years ago:

100%, Flour (all-purpose)
59.3%, Water
3.75%, Sugar
2.63%, Salt,
8.78%, Extra virgin olive oil
0.94%, Instant dry yeast (IDY)

Thickness factor (TF) = 0.103
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Offline dmckean44

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Re: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2014, 01:00:16 PM »
The distictive aspects of CPK's crust are the use of all purpose flour and a LOT of oil.  Here's the formulation that I found several years ago:

100%, Flour (all-purpose)
59.3%, Water
3.75%, Sugar
2.63%, Salt,
8.78%, Extra virgin olive oil
0.94%, Instant dry yeast (IDY)

Thickness factor (TF) = 0.103

A lot is relative, I just mixed a dough with 27% oil.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2014, 01:54:34 PM »
For those who are interested, they can see the ingredients for Domino's pizza doughs and other food items at https://order.dominos.com/en/pages/content/nutritional/ingredients.jsp. The Domino's Nutrition Guide is set forth at https://order.dominos.com/en/assets/derived/pdf/DominosNutritionGuide.pdf.

CPK does not reveal its ingredients but they do disclose their Nutrition Facts at http://info.cpk.com/documents/nutrition_facts.pdf.

Peter

Offline UrbanNoir75

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Re: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2014, 07:26:36 PM »
The ubiquitous crust you speak of is NOT a sign of California pizza, its a result of fast food chains cost cutting methods.   Domino's is no more authentic or Representative of California pizza then Taco Bell is to Mexican food.  Pizza in California is getting better and better, but not the delivery kind, it's garbage.  There are some great pizza places in San Francisco like Pizzaiolo's, Tony's Pizza Napoletana,  and Los Angles there is Mozza which is owned by Chef Mario Batali and La Brea Bakery Chef Nancy Silverton or in Long Beach Micheal's Pizza winner of Zagat. 2013

I am not an expert on crust but from what I gather, they do several things that are cost cutting that make it so spongy.  Without knowing the recipe I cant really comment but I would guess they use some oil in the dough which helps for browning but kill the gluten... so more dense crust.  They also use minimum wage part time workers so let's just say they do not know how to really push out the dough correctly.  And probably most important is the oven.  The best pizzas are made in a wood fired oven at high heat baking in about 2 minutes, Domino's uses some kind of conveyer system and therefore the heat is probably a lot lower so the dough dose not get the big blast of heat it needs to puff up in the oven before the structure sets.  Ergo, thick bready crust.  I would not be surprised at all if they use dough conditioners and other chemical so it can be made in huge quantities and stored for long periods of time.

Thanks for the reply.  You mentioned oil helping it to brown, but killing gluten giving it a more dense crust. Nothing about this crust seemed dense. It tasted light and almost rubbery. Not like a pleasant light and fluffy dough. It tasted like the particulate stuff Subway just got busted for putting in their bread trying to be pizza dough. It simply tasted cheap.

Clearly there was less of something I'm used to getting, and possibly more of something I'm not used to. You mentioned dough conditioners. Do you happen to know what some common dough conditioners are, and what their effects are?
“The cheaper the crook, the gaudier the patter.” -- Sam Spade - The Maltese Falcon

Offline UrbanNoir75

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Re: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2014, 07:29:02 PM »
I guess a good general question more succinctly distilled from my original post would be, what are common ways for major chains to cut corners with their dough, and what is the effect of that corner-cutting?
“The cheaper the crook, the gaudier the patter.” -- Sam Spade - The Maltese Falcon

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: California style crust vs. cheap fluffy Domino's crust?
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2014, 05:22:14 AM »
Thanks for the reply.  You mentioned oil helping it to brown, but killing gluten giving it a more dense crust. Nothing about this crust seemed dense. It tasted light and almost rubbery. Not like a pleasant light and fluffy dough. It tasted like the particulate stuff Subway just got busted for putting in their bread trying to be pizza dough. It simply tasted cheap.

Clearly there was less of something I'm used to getting, and possibly more of something I'm not used to. You mentioned dough conditioners. Do you happen to know what some common dough conditioners are, and what their effects are?

adding the oil after the water has been mixed with the flour will produce oil between the gluten strands, instead of oil impeding the gluten

and, whole milk, egg. great dough conditioners, cheap, easy. a few % on the egg and same with the milk is all you need really
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