Author Topic: Thin and flexible dough  (Read 1574 times)

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Offline shari23

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Thin and flexible dough
« on: February 27, 2014, 09:56:12 PM »
Hi, I am in search of pizza that is on the thinner side and you can bend in half to eat.  I've made mine with all purpose flour and baked on stone in a regular oven and it comes out hard not flexible when baked. Any great recipe out there would be so helpful :)


Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2014, 07:38:37 AM »
can you post your recipe, first?
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Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2014, 09:41:40 AM »
Here's my recipe:  1 cup water 120 degrees
                              2 tbsp. virgin olive oil
                               3 1/2 cups all purpose flour divided
                              1 package active dry yeast
                              1 tsp. sugar
                              1/2 tsp. salt
I let rise 45 mins. in warm place  than I put in frig overnight.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2014, 11:04:20 AM »
Shari23;
You might try this:
Change your flour to a stronger, bread type flour such as Pillsbury "Bread Flour" available at most supermarkets. This flour has about 12% protein content. To the flour, add 1-tablespoon of wheat gluten (also available at most supermarkets). If you can't get the gluten, don't sweat it.
Adjust the water temperature to 105F.
Put the active dry yeast into the water and stir well, then set aside for about 10-minutes, or until you see bubbles forming in the yeast suspension.
Stir the yest suspension and pour into mixing bowl.
Add flour and remaining ingredients and begin mixing the dough in your normal manner.
Immediately after mixing, form the dough into a ball, lightly oil it and place it into a bread bag. Twist the open end into a pony tail to close it and tuck the pony tail under the dough ball as you place it into the refrigerator. Allow the dough to cold ferment overnight. The dough can be used over 24 to 48-hours. To use, remove the dough from the fridge, and allow to temper AT room temperature for about 2-hours, then turn the dough out of the bag into a bowl of dusting flour and open into pizza skin(s) for dressing and baking. Bake on a preheated stone in a HOT oven. You may need to experiment with the position in the oven.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline norma427

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2014, 11:35:10 AM »
Tom,

I don't know if you read Shari's other posts, but she is looking to learn how to make the kind of style of pizza she wants for a pizza business.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30482.msg303855#msg303855  and  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30492.msg303933#msg303933   

Shari did PM me and I basically said there were too many things to explain about learning how to make a changeover from a home pizza maker to a professional pizza maker in PM's.  I also said they are many variables in understanding how to make pizzas. 

Norma
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2014, 04:56:35 PM »
Norma;
No I didn't. I just caught the one that is posted above. With my very heavy and tight travel schedule right now (will continue through the entire first quarter) I don't have time to go back and read all of the earlier posts all the time. You are absolutely correct, it is a big thing to go from home pizza making to making pizza in a store. Anymore, I don't even encourage anyone to practice making pizzas at home in preparation for their store because so many things will ultimately change unless they have a taste for home made pizza. What a lot of people don't realize is that you can get away with a lot more in your home kitchen than you can in your store where you will be forced to crank out pizzas faster than leaves falling off of a tree in the fall, plus you are tasked with managing a lot more dough than just a few dough balls, and the end pizzas all have to be of consistent quality if you expect to get a good price for your pizzas. Right now I'm working with a company that is expanding from just a couple of stores to over 50 and now they have discovered that what they were doing previously in those two stores cannot be effectively managed across the number of stores they already have much less 50 stores.
Tom Lehmann/TheDough Doctor

Offline norma427

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2014, 06:49:47 PM »
Norma;
No I didn't. I just caught the one that is posted above. With my very heavy and tight travel schedule right now (will continue through the entire first quarter) I don't have time to go back and read all of the earlier posts all the time. You are absolutely correct, it is a big thing to go from home pizza making to making pizza in a store. Anymore, I don't even encourage anyone to practice making pizzas at home in preparation for their store because so many things will ultimately change unless they have a taste for home made pizza. What a lot of people don't realize is that you can get away with a lot more in your home kitchen than you can in your store where you will be forced to crank out pizzas faster than leaves falling off of a tree in the fall, plus you are tasked with managing a lot more dough than just a few dough balls, and the end pizzas all have to be of consistent quality if you expect to get a good price for your pizzas. Right now I'm working with a company that is expanding from just a couple of stores to over 50 and now they have discovered that what they were doing previously in those two stores cannot be effectively managed across the number of stores they already have much less 50 stores.
Tom Lehmann/TheDough Doctor

Tom,

I agree it is much harder to manage a lot of dough balls in the course of a days time than a few.  The oven used, mixer and everything else including temperature of the final dough, how hot is where someone is working and many variables all can make it different than making pizzas at home. 

Good luck with your heavy and tight travel schedule and also with the company that is expanding from a couple of stores to over 50.  I find that interesting that they have discovered what they were doing previously in those two stores can not be effectively managed across the board when expanding to a lot more stores.

Norma
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Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2014, 08:18:20 PM »
Than you for the info, I found a store that sells 50 lb bag of flour with high gluten, how high should the protein on it be?  Also, what's up with gluten free flour

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2014, 09:10:57 PM »
Than you for the info, I found a store that sells 50 lb bag of flour with high gluten, how high should the protein on it be?  Also, what's up with gluten free flour
How high do you want it.... what type of pizza do you want?
Gluten free flour if for making gluten free pizza.Celiac disease.

Bob
« Last Edit: February 28, 2014, 09:13:23 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline norma427

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2014, 09:41:54 PM »
Than you for the info, I found a store that sells 50 lb bag of flour with high gluten, how high should the protein on it be?  Also, what's up with gluten free flour

Shari,

What is the name of name of the high gluten flour?  High gluten flour can mean different things and that is why I asked the brand.

Norma
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Offline mp233069

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2014, 11:27:10 PM »
Your recipe is similar to mine except I use 1/2 tbsp of sugar and 1 1/2 tsp of salt. I also use a 2 hour rise. I make 2 dough balls and then refrigerate 24 hours minimum. This makes a New York style pizza that is crunchy on the outside and chewy on the inside. I can fold it in half and it reminds me of the pizza I use to get on 42nd street when I was a kid living in NYC in the 60's. Sometimes I'll throw in an egg while I'm mixing the dough.
Mario

Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2014, 10:28:55 AM »
You use bread flour but what does an egg do???

Offline mp233069

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2014, 11:25:13 AM »
Hi shari23
I use all purpose flour. The egg idea I got from watching a video link provided on the forum about Bruno D'Fabio. I don't always use it. But the last 1/2 cup of flour I add slowly to the mixer and stop every once in a while and test the dough with my finger. If it doesn't need anymore dough, I won't necessarily add the full 1/2 cup.
Mario

Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #13 on: March 02, 2014, 04:29:09 PM »
Shari23;
You might try this:
Change your flour to a stronger, bread type flour such as Pillsbury "Bread Flour" available at most supermarkets. This flour has about 12% protein content. To the flour, add 1-tablespoon of wheat gluten (also available at most supermarkets). If you can't get the gluten, don't sweat it.
Adjust the water temperature to 105F.
Put the active dry yeast into the water and stir well, then set aside for about 10-minutes, or until you see bubbles forming in the yeast suspension.
Stir the yest suspension and pour into mixing bowl.
Add flour and remaining ingredients and begin mixing the dough in your normal manner.
Immediately after mixing, form the dough into a ball, lightly oil it and place it into a bread bag. Twist the open end into a pony tail to close it and tuck the pony tail under the dough ball as you place it into the refrigerator. Allow the dough to cold ferment overnight. The dough can be used over 24 to 48-hours. To use, remove the dough from the fridge, and allow to temper AT room temperature for about 2-hours, then turn the dough out of the bag into a bowl of dusting flour and open into pizza skin(s) for dressing and baking. Bake on a preheated stone in a HOT oven. You may need to experiment with the position in the oven.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
Here's my recipe:  1 cup water 120 degrees

                              2 tbsp. virgin olive oil
                               3 1/2 cups all purpose flour divided
                              1 package active dry yeast
                              1 tsp. sugar
                              1/2 tsp. salt
I let rise 45 mins. in warm place  than I put in frig overnight.
I bought Pillsbury bread flour, on it the protein was 4, isn't that the same as aLl purpose flour?

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2014, 01:24:50 AM »
the nutritional protein content isn't the same thing as protein in the flour. one cup of flour may have 4g of protein (of your DV), but the protein in the flour can be at 8%.

if you put one teaspoon of salt in a cup of flour, you have 290% of your daily value in sodium if you consume that cup of flour. but the cup of flour has ~4% salt. do you follow?

read below.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2014, 01:26:52 AM by c0mpl3x »
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2014, 07:37:14 AM »
Jon,

I believe that the 4 grams of protein that Shari mentioned is the number of grams of protein per serving of the flour. Because of rounding, you can't do a simple calculation to arrive at the actual percent of protein of the flour in question. This is a matter that came up recently and was discussed in detail at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30417.msg303328#msg303328 .

Peter

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2014, 07:44:26 PM »
Jon,

I believe that the 4 grams of protein that Shari mentioned is the number of grams of protein per serving of the flour. Because of rounding, you can't do a simple calculation to arrive at the actual percent of protein of the flour in question. This is a matter that came up recently and was discussed in detail at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30417.msg303328#msg303328 .

Peter

yes, pete, i pointed that out. 4% of dv of protein per 'cup' of flour, i explained why 4% is not correct with the salt and flour example.
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline shari23

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2014, 09:31:08 PM »
the nutritional protein content isn't the same thing as protein in the flour. one cup of flour may have 4g of protein (of your DV), but the protein in the flour can be at 8%.

if you put one teaspoon of salt in a cup of flour, you have 290% of your daily value in sodium if you consume that cup of flour. but the cup of flour has ~4% salt. do you follow?

read below.
I am still confused, I bought bread flour and the protein was 4 percent. It's a bit confusing doing the calculation. Also, they sell King Arthur flour in a small bag and it is quite expensive in my food store.  I am going to try making a pizza Tom with the bread flour on my stone in regular oven. Will it make a foldable pizza crust or is the way in a pizza oven?

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2014, 10:10:48 PM »
I am still confused, I bought bread flour and the protein was 4 percent. It's a bit confusing doing the calculation. Also, they sell King Arthur flour in a small bag and it is quite expensive in my food store.  I am going to try making a pizza Tom with the bread flour on my stone in regular oven. Will it make a foldable pizza crust or is the way in a pizza oven?
Your 4g was per serving of 30g of flour.  30 divided by 4 = 7.5%(this is how you compute protein %)     Bread flour is waay more than 7.5% but as Peter pointed out....the producers are allowed to round/approximate and therefore you can not rely on what the bag says.  OK?

Bob
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Online mitchjg

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Re: Thin and flexible dough
« Reply #19 on: March 03, 2014, 10:23:26 PM »
Your 4g was per serving of 30g of flour.  30 divided by 4 = 7.5%(this is how you compute protein %)     Bread flour is waay more than 7.5% but as Peter pointed out....the producers are allowed to round/approximate and therefore you can not rely on what the bag says.  OK?

Bob

Sorry Bob.  4 grams of protein in a 30 gram serving is 4/30 = 13.33%.

Also, I recommend you guys see the thread that Peter discussed:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30417.msg303328#msg303328

You will see that the actual protein %, when the stated number of grams is 4, is somewhere in a pretty wide range.  Rounding off to the nearest gram makes it pretty impossible to use the information.

- Mitch


 

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