Author Topic: First pizza on 1/2 steel..... disaster, burned nasty pizza - help please  (Read 764 times)

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Offline haeffnkr

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Hi,
I made my first pizza a few weeks ago.
I tried to use a pizza stone... part of it broke, on my weber gas grill.
Temp was around 550/600 per the thermometer on the grill.
The remaining part of the pizza stone was intact and I made pizza, it was pretty good for my first try.
The sauce I made was not the best.

Fast forward to this week.
I researched steel instead of stones...I got my 16 x 22 - 1/2 steel plate ready to go yesterday.
I researched PJ sauce, I used the same dough, Peter Reinhart's recipe that I had success with last time.,
I had some cheese and pepperoni, trying to make some decent, plain pizza that the kids will eat.

I fired up the grill for 30 minutes, made the new pizzas, came back and the thermometer was around 650, great I thought.
I got the pizzas on there and went up to make another one... came back in 4 minutes... pizza where not quite done on the top by burnt on the bottom.
I threw on the last one, ham and pineapple, and it burned faster.

After attempted to eat it I found the bottom was burned but the top/middle of the crust was not cooked through.
So...can you get steel TOO hot?
What did I do wrong?

See my pics below of my setup.
I have a standard older style weber grill, I left baffles in it, I added 4 rocks, so the steel was about 2" higher than the cooking grates.
Again, when I did this with the pizza stone, it was pretty good and the bottom of the pizza was about perfect.

thanks in advance
Kevin

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5478/14322106181_3369802767_b.jpg

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2926/14138827450_3599af1e17_b.jpg

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5320/14302304436_1939fee5ed_b.jpg

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5506/14325441085_7526db3562_b.jpg

https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2911/14138823610_948a691bc1_b.jpg

« Last Edit: June 01, 2014, 10:30:03 PM by haeffnkr »


Offline TXCraig1

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You can't use steel with a bottom heat source. It's way too conductive. I would suggest going the exact opposite direction with a grill - very low conductivity stone such as a FibramentD and insulate the top to get as much top heat as possible. Here is how I was able to achieve some measure of balance:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=9614.0

Keep in mind that grills are not designed for this and it is dangerous. You really shouldn't do it, and if you do, be very careful and keep the kids the heck away from it.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline haeffnkr

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Hi,
I did not know a steel would be too conductive with bottom heat.
How is a steel used in a regular oven?
I thought it was preheated and then the broiler was used also


Thanks for the links those are some nice setups.
If I put fire bricks down on my grill to buffer the heat, then the steel would it burn the pizza the same?

thanks Kevin


Offline TXCraig1

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Steel works well in a regular oven where you don't have the heat source directly below it as you do in a grill. That's why a preheated steel+broiler works so well. It balances the heat. High radiant heat above and high conductive heat below.

If you diffuse the heat below the steel on a grill with bricks, you may alleviate the bottom burning, but you will likely still have difficulty browning the top. Sufficient top heat is always the difficulty with grills.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline haeffnkr

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I just googled a slick setup.
http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2013/04/the-pizza-lab-combine-the-kettlepizza-and-the-baking-steel-for-the-ultimate-home-pizza-setup.html

What if I put fire brick on the grates and put the steel above the bricks and make a "Pizza Sandwich" like they did in the link?
Brick to slowly heat the crust and the steel to radiate heat down on the toppings?

thanks Kevin

edit - looks like some people are already making a pizza sandwich :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1O1x4bdpC0
« Last Edit: June 01, 2014, 11:20:56 PM by haeffnkr »

Offline TXCraig1

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Try it, see what happens, tweak accordingly, and try again. That's how great pizza is made whether you are working on the oven or crust.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline norma427

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haeffnkr,

I agree with Craig.  Try some different oven set-ups, temperatures, and also try different formulations.
 
If you didn't already see Steve (Ev's) modded grill it is at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20006.0  I also modded my regular propane BBQ grill for some pizzas at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20126.0 This is the thread I went on the journey of modding my propane BBQ grill with different set-ups.  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=11133.0   Different members helped me there and a few members posted photos and told of their BBQ grill set-ups.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Also, if the thermometer is on the lid of the grill, that 550-600 reading probably means the temperature of the stone/steel is more like 750.

Offline misterschu

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The baking steel is meant to be used in an oven, where the maximum temperature is 500 or 550F. Using a steel in this environment mimics a higher temperature oven through faster conduction of heat into the dough.

Your outdoor bbq grill can easily be 700F. Putting dough on 700F steel will cook the bottom VERY quickly, and without equivalent heat conduction around the rest of the pizza, you will see uneven cooking, as you have.