Author Topic: are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?  (Read 610 times)

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Offline preppystud

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are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?
« on: March 05, 2014, 09:27:02 PM »
right now i am using a non-stick pan to make pizzas.

other than the bottom being crisp, what else can those things do?


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2014, 11:23:19 PM »
Search the forum and note how many others are using non-stick pans...and then ask your question again.  ;D

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline bigMoose

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Re: are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2014, 09:13:19 AM »
Preppy, I am sort of a newb at sorting out my baking... am in my early 60's and learned from my Italian Grandma... but just got back into it full steam after retiring for the 2nd time...

Here is what I can tell you:

I started with a bare oven and a cookie sheet.  Pie was "great" ... well because I made it from Grandma's recipe... but then I went in search of other styles... Crispy Cracker Crust, NY style, Chicago thin... each different, but all Pizza's.  I started to "dither" with my oven.  Bought a cheap $10 pizza stone.  Made things better, a bit.  More skin crispiness and a bit more dewatering of soggy toppings.  Then I learned to max out the oven at 550 deg.  Pizza better, and the stone shattered twice.

There abouts I had the privilege to take my ingredients and bake 3 pies in Walter's commercial Blodgett 1000 ovens.  One ran around 460 deg F and the other perhaps in the 600's (I think.)  I was BLOWN away.  All those pizzas were the best I ever made.  I went home, and for 2 months now have been trying to reproduce those results.

I have gone to a thick cordierite stone from Old Stone Ovens.  It does not have to be babbied, and made a huge jump upwards for my bread and pizza baking.  Crusts got crispier, toppings dewatered, more thermal mass in the oven. I have it about mid way up in my oven.

The next step that helped came from my bread baking quest.  I put a 8 x 10 inch tray on the bottom rack filled with new barbecue lava rocks.  In my bread baking I pour 4 oz of hot water on them at the beginning of the bake cycle to create oven steam.  For pizza I just leave them in the oven.  With a good preheat, they give more thermal mass to my oven and again make the baking better.

My next steps are to re-engineer our (read wifey's) GE oven to defeat the lock on the clean cycle, so I can cook on the clean cycle.  I also looked at snagging a Blodgett 1000 oven and putting it in the garage...

My wife is starting to have a real hard time with me and wants me to find more clients and get back to, as she said, "real work..."   :(   I tried to explain to her, that after visiting two operating pizza/bakeries (Walter's and Larry's) that those guys work harder in a day than I ever did in a week!

Bottom line suggestion: Drop the 40 or 50 bucks and get a good Cordierite stone... leave it in your oven... you will never look back!

Good luck on your journey.

Offline anverc

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Re: are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2014, 04:22:23 PM »
Preppy, as bigMoose said, and i don't think he said it clearly enough, you're going to see a huge difference with even a $10 stone over your non stick pan.  (What you're doing now might not even be safe... DuPont doesn't recommend going above 500F for instance.)

what will happen, though, with that $10 stone is that it's going to break on you while you're making a pizza one night.

alternatively, for a few bucks you can line your oven with quarry tiles.  The DIY checkouts at homedepot accept pocket change like a coinstar (but they don't charge you).  Clear out your sofas and car of change and you've got yourself a "free" trial.  They're also going to break on you, but at that point you're going to do whatever you can to pick up a nice stone instead of reverting back to your non-stick.

The next step that helped came from my bread baking quest.  I put a 8 x 10 inch tray on the bottom rack filled with new barbecue lava rocks.  In my bread baking I pour 4 oz of hot water on them at the beginning of the bake cycle to create oven steam.  For pizza I just leave them in the oven.  With a good preheat, they give more thermal mass to my oven and again make the baking better.
cool idea for holding the water, i'm going to get some of these this weekend :D

i'm making a pizza utility app.  check it out and give suggestions! http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30444.0

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2014, 04:32:31 PM »
In other words...yes, it's crisps the bottom and allows you to make a real pizza....what more could you want.  :chef:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline pythonic

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Re: are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2014, 04:22:22 PM »
Preppy, I am sort of a newb at sorting out my baking... am in my early 60's and learned from my Italian Grandma... but just got back into it full steam after retiring for the 2nd time...

Here is what I can tell you:

I started with a bare oven and a cookie sheet.  Pie was "great" ... well because I made it from Grandma's recipe... but then I went in search of other styles... Crispy Cracker Crust, NY style, Chicago thin... each different, but all Pizza's.  I started to "dither" with my oven.  Bought a cheap $10 pizza stone.  Made things better, a bit.  More skin crispiness and a bit more dewatering of soggy toppings.  Then I learned to max out the oven at 550 deg.  Pizza better, and the stone shattered twice.

There abouts I had the privilege to take my ingredients and bake 3 pies in Walter's commercial Blodgett 1000 ovens.  One ran around 460 deg F and the other perhaps in the 600's (I think.)  I was BLOWN away.  All those pizzas were the best I ever made.  I went home, and for 2 months now have been trying to reproduce those results.

I have gone to a thick cordierite stone from Old Stone Ovens.  It does not have to be babbied, and made a huge jump upwards for my bread and pizza baking.  Crusts got crispier, toppings dewatered, more thermal mass in the oven. I have it about mid way up in my oven.

The next step that helped came from my bread baking quest.  I put a 8 x 10 inch tray on the bottom rack filled with new barbecue lava rocks.  In my bread baking I pour 4 oz of hot water on them at the beginning of the bake cycle to create oven steam.  For pizza I just leave them in the oven.  With a good preheat, they give more thermal mass to my oven and again make the baking better.

My next steps are to re-engineer our (read wifey's) GE oven to defeat the lock on the clean cycle, so I can cook on the clean cycle.  I also looked at snagging a Blodgett 1000 oven and putting it in the garage...

My wife is starting to have a real hard time with me and wants me to find more clients and get back to, as she said, "real work..."   :(   I tried to explain to her, that after visiting two operating pizza/bakeries (Walter's and Larry's) that those guys work harder in a day than I ever did in a week!

Bottom line suggestion: Drop the 40 or 50 bucks and get a good Cordierite stone... leave it in your oven... you will never look back!

Good luck on your journey.

BigMoose,

I'm finally using a coerdite stone myself and I love it.  Next step for me is the 1/2 inch steel.  To better pizzas.........
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline bigMoose

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Re: are quarry tiles and pizza stones really that good?
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2014, 04:36:03 PM »
I just got a 3rd rack for the wife'y oven... Still concerned about 50# of steel and our porcelain floor tile in the kitchen.   I KNOW what is going to happen sooner or later... I'd rather put a Blodgett 1000 out in the garage!  :-D


 

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