Author Topic: Malt in dough?  (Read 502 times)

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Offline Auralnauts

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Malt in dough?
« on: March 06, 2014, 08:19:30 PM »
Howdy pals. Today my boss is asking a question. "How much malt should I add for a 50 pound of high gluten flour? "

Now, I don't know what he means by malt and he said you guys would understand so hopefully you guys will help him out.
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Malt in dough?
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2014, 08:44:23 PM »
Howdy pals. Today my boss is asking a question. "How much malt should I add for a 50 pound of high gluten flour? "

Now, I don't know what he means by malt and he said you guys would understand so hopefully you guys will help him out.
Auralnauts,

There are two types of malt that can be added to flour--diastatic and nondiastatic. Diastatic malt is to get more enzyme performance to release sugars from damaged starch. Nondiastatic malt is a form of sugar that can be used for sweetening purposes. You might ask the boss which form of malt he has in mind.

Peter

Offline Auralnauts

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Re: Malt in dough?
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2014, 11:46:09 AM »
Will ask him today Pete, his daughter is having a baby so it's really slowing down this adventure of adding malt to our dough.
Dough, stretch, sauce, cheese; check.

Offline Auralnauts

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Re: Malt in dough?
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2014, 02:41:20 PM »
Bossman said he has no idea and he would like a recipe for both diastic and non-diastic.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Malt in dough?
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2014, 04:48:54 PM »
Bossman said he has no idea and he would like a recipe for both diastic and non-diastic.
Auralnauts,

To familiarize yourself with the differences between the two forms of malt, you might want to read the definitions given for diastatic and nondiastatic malt in the forum's Pizza Glossary at http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html. There is also a good article on malt in general--albeit more technical in nature--at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8308.0.html. You can also see Tom Lehmann's discussion of the two forms of malt at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=609.msg5969;topicseen#msg5969.

I can't speak for flours in Columbia, but in the U.S. just about all milled white flours are malted. The ingredient most often used is malted barley. You will usually see it in flour ingredients listings, both at the retail and commercial levels. Malted barley is often called diastatic malt. As mentioned above and in the articles and posts cited, its purpose is to attack damaged starch in the flour and convert it to natural sugars to feed the yeast and for crust coloration purposes. Sometimes you will see the word enzyme in a flour ingredients list and, less often, fungal amylase. They all are diastatic ingredients that serve the same purpose as diastatic malt. In your boss' case, you may want to find out whether his flour is already malted or not. In the U.S., according to what a General Mills rep told me, the amount of barley malt that is added to flours is typically in the range of 0.1-0.2% of the flour weight. If the boss's flour is already malted, he may not want to add any diastatic malt, or he may chose to add only a small amount. But you don't want to overdo the diastatic malt because too much diastatic malt in the flour can lead to a wet and slack and clammy dough with poor performance. So, if a pure diastatic malt (malted barley) is to be used, I would try to keep the total amount of that form of malt at no more than about 0.75-1% of the flour weight. There are commercial diastatic malts that can be used at greater levels but they usually are not pure diastatic malts or they are specialty malts produced for specific applications.

As for nondiastatic malts, since they are used only for sweetening purposes, usually as a substitute for ordinary table sugar, the amount to use will depend on the dough recipe used. If there is already sugar in the recipe, up to one half of that can be replaced with nondiastatic malt, although I have seen recipes on occasion that use only nondiastatic malt. Several years ago, Sbarro restaurants used only nondiastatic malt (i.e., no sugar) for its NY style dough in its stores in the U.S. I believe that the nondiastatic malt was at around 2% of the flour weight. You also don't want to go too high with the nondiastatic malt because it can lead to a crumb that is too dark in color.

Both the diastatic and nondiastatic forms of malt come in liquid or dry form. So, if a liquid form is used, the boss may want to adjust the formula hydration (lower it) to compensate for the liquid component of the malt used. That liquid component will depend on the type and brand of malt used.

It is also possible to use both forms of malt in the same dough, since their purpose and function are somewhat mutually exclusive when used at the proper values, So, you don't want to go overboard with either form of malt.

Peter


 

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