Author Topic: How do you get great color on dough?  (Read 639 times)

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Offline PizzaAlaJoey

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How do you get great color on dough?
« on: March 12, 2014, 07:15:06 PM »
I had to make dough in one day the other week for a friend's family. Usually I let it ferment for three to five days. The color seems to get darker when it is aged. Would it however benefit the color to put a tad of oil or sugar in it? I have stayed away from that because it affects the dough in other ways.


Offline pythonic

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Re: How do you get great color on dough?
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2014, 12:35:32 AM »
Yes.  Sugar and oil will help with browning.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: How do you get great color on dough?
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2014, 06:06:47 PM »
@Pizza AlaJoey, I also like a simple, lean dough without sugar or oil, and I have no trouble getting great color on my doughs thanks to long, cold fermentation. The greatest artisan breads in the world are made or four ingredients, flour, water, salt and yeast (or sourdough starter) and most are dark without the need for oil or sugar. Oil's primary role in a dough is as a tenderizer, sugars primary role in dough is as a sweetener/flavor enhancer. Proper fermentation and cooking technique is all that is needed to give dough color, why change your dough if you are satisfied with the result you are getting now?

Offline Qapla

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Re: How do you get great color on dough?
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2014, 07:56:14 PM »
Since the only part of the dough that needs to have good color is the outer crust .... you can always try an egg wash.

Offline PizzaAlaJoey

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Re: How do you get great color on dough?
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2014, 01:03:36 AM »
Thanks DmCavanagh. I think I need to just make it a rule to not make pizza with less fermentation than two or three days. Also I think oven's can have an effect primarily WFO. I may put a touch of oil just to get the dough more tender and less grainy feeling. Perhaps my technique has improved though where that won't exist with thicker pizzas anymore though.

Offline bhopper

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Re: How do you get great color on dough?
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2014, 08:27:14 PM »
Sugars roll in the dough is to feed the yeast over a longer ferment and it also caramelizes, the by product of the yeast eating the sugar is alcohol which I believe also helps with color. Oil and hydration effect the elasticity of the dough.  An egg wash will make it look like a pretzel.

Offline PizzaAlaJoey

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Re: How do you get great color on dough?
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2014, 11:03:33 PM »
Wow. Thanks Bhopper.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: How do you get great color on dough?
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2014, 08:16:39 AM »
Sugar and oil in small amounts, around 1% for sugar and up to 3% oil, will help with browning significantly. Coupled with a fully fermented dough, you can get great results with these two ingredients in a standard home oven at an acceptable bake time. Pizza shops and restaurants with high heat ovens don't necessarily need help with their dough browning, but they often add it anyway to get a certain amount of crispy "char" speckled around the crust. Bread bakers do not add sugar or oil because they are normally baking their product for 30 minutes or more, which gives the bread enough time to brown properly. A pizza baked at 30 minutes would be toast.

In those small amount, you will never taste the ingredients in the final product.

John


 

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