Author Topic: perlcrete weight?  (Read 531 times)

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Offline peteH

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perlcrete weight?
« on: March 15, 2014, 01:32:32 PM »
Easy question from me today, what is the approximate weight of 6:1 perlcrete when thoroughly dried (lbs per cubic foot).  Thanks


Offline Tscarborough

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2014, 03:20:36 PM »
It depends upon the perlcrete.  The one I sell is 33# for 4 cut ft, so 6 cuft would be 49-1/2#, plus 94# (one cuft of portland), plus some amount of water. Call it 24# per cuft.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2014, 03:53:23 PM »
Is yours that dusty block fill kind, T?
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Offline Tscarborough

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2014, 04:00:48 PM »
It is block fill, but we recently switched manufacturers to a coarser one.  Much better.

Offline peteH

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2014, 04:12:03 PM »
Ok, thanks for the info.  I am thinking about pouring a 4ft x 5 ft x 4" perlcrete  slab in my garage since is is still going below freezing up here in CT.  Assuming that will weigh about 125 lb, me and a buddy should be able to lift that into place

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2014, 04:28:56 PM »
If it doesn't break into 3 or 4 pieces.  Better to pour-in-place if at all possible.

Offline peteH

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2014, 05:00:04 PM »
Ok, thanks for the advice, i will wait.  How many days in a row does it have to be continually above freezing?

Offline shuboyje

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2014, 05:16:29 PM »
Pour it on top of a piece of 3/4" plywood, and then use that to move it and you won't have any issues.  Well made Perlcrete has some tensile strength, just not much.  I've cast pieces in forms and moved them without issue multiple times.
-Jeff

Offline stonecutter

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2014, 05:23:47 PM »
A week at least, probably longer. Though I don't think it would matter much if it froze, perlcrete  is pretty  crumbly even in perfect conditions.   

I lived in NW CT until a few years ago, I don't miss those single digit working days...at least your not trying to build a stone wall in it.


If it was me, having the garage space and if I wanted to do that type of pour at this time of year,  I would form and pour the slab on a sheet of 3/4" plywood, over 2x4s in the nice warm garage.   Then you can carry it over to your stand and slide it onto the structural slab after it dries out.
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Offline stonecutter

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2014, 05:24:23 PM »
Pour it on top of a piece of 3/4" plywood, and then use that to move it and you won't have any issues.  Well made Perlcrete has some tensile strength, just not much.  I've cast pieces in forms and moved them without issue multiple times.

Jinx...you owe me a beer.
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Offline Tscarborough

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2014, 06:16:40 PM »
If you do it on plywood, cover the plywood with poly first or you wont get it off.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2014, 06:26:26 PM »
You could do that or spray it down with WD40... When it dries it will pull away from the ply, especially with a coarse perlite at 6:1
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Offline peteH

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2014, 06:55:32 PM »
Correct me if am wrong with plywood form ideas, I would flip the form over so the open side would sit on the structural concrete and the plywood bottom  side would now be the top where the hearth firebricks would go , correct?

Offline shuboyje

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2014, 07:47:09 PM »
I wouldn't do it that way personally.  Trying to flip a piece that size is gonna be nearly impossible to do without breaking it.  I would just make sure to screed it like you would if you were pouring in place and then I would put the plywood next to the concrete slab on legs and slide the Perlcrete over.
-Jeff

Offline peteH

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2014, 07:54:28 PM »
I understand now, thanks

Offline stonecutter

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2014, 08:40:01 PM »
My suggestion of the 2x4s is so you can use them to carry the form without deflection. Also, I would not unmould the insulating slab until it is slid off the plywood, so you don't chip the edges and corners moving it into position.

Either way should work fine.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2014, 08:42:42 PM by stonecutter »
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Offline peteH

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2014, 03:47:03 PM »
Ok, so my question around the perlcrete weight for the floor insulation was asked because I was thinking about using that as the base of a dry fit oven.  As I got many replies, my wheels continued to turn, I recall reading that dry perlite is added for extra insulation.  Since a dry fit oven is meant to be assembled quickly while sacrificing performance (at least the one I plan to make), would it improve the performance of the oven if I placed the bricks over a 3-4" layer of dry perlite and then poured dry perlite in between the inner and outer brick walls (first is firebrick, the outer wall would be any clay brick I could find.  Lastly, I would place a sheet of aluminum over the roof firebrick (to prevent perlite from falling on the pizza through the dry fit gaps) and add a layer of dry perlite to this (with maybe something to prevent that perlite from blowing away (more brick or another sheet of aluminum).  So I know this idea is well outside the box,  do you think it would work, would it be only marginally better than just a simple dryfit oven with no insulation, or last, a complete waste of time.  I did build a dryfit a few months ago and the pizzas that came out of it were great but it had to be recharged between pizzas.  Anyway, interested in any ones thoughts.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2014, 04:07:53 PM »
Ok, so my question around the perlcrete weight for the floor insulation was asked because I was thinking about using that as the base of a dry fit oven.  As I got many replies, my wheels continued to turn, I recall reading that dry perlite is added for extra insulation.  Since a dry fit oven is meant to be assembled quickly while sacrificing performance (at least the one I plan to make), would it improve the performance of the oven if I placed the bricks over a 3-4" layer of dry perlite and then poured dry perlite in between the inner and outer brick walls (first is firebrick, the outer wall would be any clay brick I could find.  Lastly, I would place a sheet of aluminum over the roof firebrick (to prevent perlite from falling on the pizza through the dry fit gaps) and add a layer of dry perlite to this (with maybe something to prevent that perlite from blowing away (more brick or another sheet of aluminum).  So I know this idea is well outside the box,  do you think it would work, would it be only marginally better than just a simple dryfit oven with no insulation, or last, a complete waste of time.  I did build a dryfit a few months ago and the pizzas that came out of it were great but it had to be recharged between pizzas.  Anyway, interested in any ones thoughts.

It won't work, no compressive strength. Pour the insulating slab, it's no big deal....Or use insulation board
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Offline peteH

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2014, 04:45:02 PM »
thanks for the speedy reply. How about on the walls and roof, dry perlite or poured perlcrete?  Although if I went with poured perlcrete, my portable dry fit oven would no longer be portable or dry fit.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: perlcrete weight?
« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2014, 06:17:19 PM »
Works great as loose fill insulation..even better than a perlcrete cladding insulation. Wrap the dome with mineral wool then fill the remaining space with loose perlite for an even better system.
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