Author Topic: Cordierite Question  (Read 181 times)

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Online the1mu

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Cordierite Question
« on: February 04, 2016, 12:46:26 AM »
The oven I have came with two stones and I finally pulled one out to weigh and measure it.

It came in at having a density (?) of 1.64 cm^3, which I believe is super low.

The only seller I have found in my area to do cordierite stones (I can custom order size and thickness, but not density) can do a 1.8 cm^3 stone.

Is it worth it to go up? How much of a difference is there really in .16 cm^3 of density? I believe scott123 used to say 2 was minimum and 2.6 was the best for a dense stone but how close are those numbers when it comes down to the thermodynamics of it?


Online the1mu

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Re: Cordierite Question
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2016, 08:42:56 AM »
All the engineers must be busy eating pizza....

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Cordierite Question
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2016, 09:31:33 AM »
You left out a couple important data points: what kind of oven, what kind of pizza, and how thick are the stones?

I can't remember anyone ever talking about a cordierite  stone with density that low. Are you sure it's cordierite?  Low density may mean lower thermal conductivity, and it will mean lower the heat storage - linearly, AOTBE. I think most of the cordierite stones we see are around 2.6, so even the denser stone you mentioned is almost 40% less dense. That's a lot of heat storage. The only way to get it back is with thickness.
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Online the1mu

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Cordierite Question
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 10:07:01 AM »
Okay. Maybe I'm just confused as to how it works.  I thought density was calculated by weight/(l*d*h). Is that true?

Going by memory, I believe my current stone is 38.67cm^2 with a thickness of 1.27cm and weighs 3110 g.

The second stone I mentioned is 38x38x1.5 and weighs 3900g approx.

Regarding the other questions... It's an electric oven and I'm shooting for NY style.

Edit: I am sure the latter is cordierite and the former, I am certain that it claims to be.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2016, 10:12:13 AM by the1mu »

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Cordierite Question
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2016, 10:27:10 AM »
I think you math is right. For NY in an electric oven, steel is probably worth looking into.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
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Online the1mu

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Re: Cordierite Question
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 10:30:51 AM »
That's fair and I've thought about it a lot. Unfortunately, my location doesn't have a lot available and what I've been able to source will cost me about 100 US and the cordierite about 1/6th of that.

So, I guess a density of 1.8 is not much more than marginally better than 1.6?

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Cordierite Question
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2016, 10:50:10 AM »
I don't know, but I'd be surprised if it made much difference.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage