Author Topic: Concealed bottom electric oven elements?  (Read 428 times)

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Offline nick57

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Concealed bottom electric oven elements?
« on: April 17, 2014, 09:05:31 PM »
 My home oven finally bit the dust after only 5 years. It was one of the ceramic top ranges. The big element in the range failed 2 years after we bought it, and I could  not even find anybody who knew how to fix it. Well, two others quit working Monday. So since then I have been trying to find a similar range. It ain't easy to find a home stove that that bakes at 550 degrees with exposed heating elements. I was informed that it was to keep food from burning on them and causing a short life to the element. In about the $1500 to $2000 price range I can find a few. I have found a few in the lower price range ( around $500) that use the traditional heating coils on the top. It seems the ones in the mid price range all have the hidden heating elements. I have found one that Sears makes that is on sale for $539, regular price of $750. It has a ceramic top, goes to 550 degrees, and has exposed elements in the oven. I am liking this one.

 So my question. Will concealed elements work as well for making pizza. My thinking is that exposed elements give off more heat, and concealed do not. I would think that the radiant heat form the metal surface instead of an exposed element would not heat the stone or crisp up the bottom of the pizza as well. Any thoughts!


Offline scott123

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Re: Concealed bottom electric oven elements?
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2014, 04:19:23 AM »
Heat rises.  Enclosing the elements will slow down the heat from rising, but, it will eventually reach the hearth and bring it to the same temperature that the exposed elements would bring it to.

You might have to pre-heat the oven a bit longer to reach the target hearth temp with an enclosed element, but it really depends on the wattage of the element.  Wattage is far more important, than enclosed/exposed, imo. The higher the better.

Whether or not enclosing an element prolongs it's life... I've seen exposed elements last 30+ years without an issue, and these were stove elements where food was frequently roasted directly on the element (roast peppers). If anything, enclosing the element will most likely cause the element to run a bit hotter, and that additional heat will probably shorten it's life span.

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Concealed bottom electric oven elements?
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2014, 07:27:28 AM »
Nick, can't answer your question, but if you get a concealed element, do not put aluminum foil on the bottom of the oven to catch drips -  numerous posts on garden web by people who bought a new stove, lined the bottom with aluminum foil as they had with their old stove with an exposed element, and ended up with aluminum "welded" to the oven floor.  As Scott says, heat rises.  In the old stoves with exposed elements, the floor was below the heat, so it got hot, but not hot enough to melt aluminum.

Offline Mmmph

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Re: Concealed bottom electric oven elements?
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2014, 10:10:54 AM »
Heat rises. 

Hot air rises.

Heat radiates in every direction. If heat rose, if you sat next to a campfire or fireplace, you wouldn't feel it.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline nick57

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Re: Concealed bottom electric oven elements?
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2014, 04:49:07 PM »
 Hot air does rise, but most of the heat you feel from a campfire is radiated heat. I have worked in A/C and heating for 40 years. and was taught thermal dynamics to get my degree in Environmental Controls and Heating.

Anyway, I bought a Sears stove that has bottom and top exposed heating elements. They are 6 pass elements, which is the same as the last stove. To see if it is as good as the last, I'll have to do a pizza test. One nice thing, my last stove would only accept a 16" stone, this will take a 18" stone. Now I can make full sized NY pizzas. I just have to find a good stone.

WARNING!!!! I did a lot of research before my purchase. I got info from service techs and owners. NEVER EVER use the cleaning cycle. The high heat will degrade the electronics, plus the burners and controls could fail after one or two cleanings. I think that is what happened to mine. Right after the first cleaning, the main element on the cooktop quit.

Thanks guys for all the great input!!!  After I started this thread I realized it should have gone into the home ovens thread. If any Mods read this, move it if you feel it is in the wrong area of the forum. Thanks!!   
« Last Edit: April 22, 2014, 08:19:48 PM by nick57 »