Author Topic: Freezing Sheeted Dough  (Read 523 times)

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Offline Talls6

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Freezing Sheeted Dough
« on: April 21, 2014, 04:33:57 PM »
Has anyone frozen, for a length of time, the sheeted skins?  I looked at some of the threads for freezing dough and it mainly deals with the Dough balls or don't have results?  I am curious if it works and if so what is the procedure for preperation after bringing them out of the freezer.  The reason is my parents and Sister want to use my skins for a party, but I don't want to be over there making pizza for them.   :chef:  If I make them at home, freeze them, transport them the 30 miles at my convenience and let them store them in a freezer until needed.  How would they go about making the pies.  Any suggestions or leads would be appreciated.  My apologies if I missed a giant thread on this..... Darren


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Freezing Sheeted Dough
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2014, 04:53:11 PM »
Darren;
Slow or static freezing of just about any type of dough is possible if you can live with a shelf life of 10 to 15-days, and in your case it looks like you will be well within the shelf life expectancy of your dough. Just formulate and process the dough in your normal manner, then form into pizza skins and place on screens or some other flat surface and freeze until solidly frozen. I like to allow for at least 90-minutes for this. Once frozen, the skins can be packaged with pieces of parchment paper separating the individual skins and placed into a plastic bag and then into a corrugated box for deliver to the place where you will be making the pizzas. For added insurance toss in a piece of dry ice before you seal up the case and drive over. When you get to your destination you can either separate the skins and place them on pans with a little peel dust and allow them to thaw overnight in the fridge, or you can keep them forzen until shortly before (about 1.5-hours) before you anticipate using them. Remove a frozen skin form the case and place it onto a surface with some peel dust or in an oiled baking pan if you intend to use one. then brush lightly with olive oil, tent with a piece of plastic and store at room temperature. The skins should be ready to go in about 90-minutes.
Tom Lehmann/the Dough Doctor

Offline Talls6

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Re: Freezing Sheeted Dough
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2014, 04:58:53 PM »
Thanks Tom, I will give it a try.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Freezing Sheeted Dough
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2014, 05:47:37 PM »
Darren, I've been thinking about freezing some Donatos style skins in the near future. It'll be a new trick for me, too, so I don't have any additional information to share. But if I do it soon, I'll try to let you know where to find whatever I have to say about it. And if you do it before me, I'll definitely be curious to read whatever you have to say about your results.

Offline Talls6

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Re: Freezing Sheeted Dough
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2014, 08:49:59 AM »
I will probably be doing some experimenting this weekend so if I come up with any good tips I will make sure I post them.  It's probably a good idea to get the technique down before I commit to providing skins for a large Pizza Party.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Freezing Sheeted Dough
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2014, 01:49:08 PM »
Tom,

Do you have any opinions of the temperature of the freezing vs. how well the skin performs after being thawed? I'm sure a lot of commercial operations that do this "flash freeze" the skins using -20 or -80 freezers. Would you expect oven spring perfomance to suffer using a regular home freezer? Is the flash frozen mainly to keep the product smelling fresh?

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Freezing Sheeted Dough
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2014, 08:50:59 AM »
Dan;
The difference between slow or static freezing (0 to -10F) and blast freezing (mechanical -25 to -35F) or cryogenic (-45 to -60F) is to establish a smaller ice crystal size at the lower temperatures. The smaller ice crystal size promotes better yeast survival and also serves to protect the gluten structure to a great extent which allows these doughs to exhibit a much longer shelf life, typically 16 to 22-weeks as opposed to 10 to 15-days for the static frozen product. When an entire pizza is frozen the lower temperatures also serve to protect the integrity of the vegetable toppings as well. As for dough performance from dough that has been frozen in a static freezer (home freezer included) if the dough is used within the shelf life limitations (10 to 15-days) the performance of the dough is actually quite good, but beyond that time period the performance of the dough gets to be somewhat "iffy" until at about 30-days you will see a dramatic loss of consistent dough performance. I have always related frozen dough performance to the old question of "how strong is a chain" with the answer "no stronger than its weakest link".
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor