Author Topic: Another dryfit question  (Read 194 times)

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Offline peteH

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Another dryfit question
« on: May 04, 2014, 05:00:18 PM »
I have been admiring the pies coming out of Michael's dryfit and I would like to build one myself up in the rural woods of northwest CT.  Part of the reason I would like to go dryfit is to avoid pouring a super heavy slab.  I do want to add the appropriate insulation though.   I have some woodworking skills (I think) so I built this rustic base out of locust trunks (~12" across)and pressure treated wood.  The base is 6 ft x 6 ft so it gives me plenty of flexibility and room for insulation.  So the question is, how do I build up from here.  One idea I had was to pour 6" of 6:1 perlcrete on top of a piece of pressure treated plywood.  Let me know if you have other ideas.  Thanks


Offline stonecutter

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Re: Another dryfit question
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2014, 08:07:47 PM »
I'm assuming you don't  want to pour a structural slab.  O.k. Then I would put a couple layers of 30# felt over the PT deck, then two layers of 1/2" Durock... Not hardy board.  Make sure to stagger the joints of the boards on the layers. Use the proper screws too.   Install a capillary break on the top layer if the DR, then pour the insulating slab on top of that.

I don't remember if I asked you, but were are you in NW CT? That's my neck of the woods ( until I moved to SC )
« Last Edit: May 04, 2014, 08:58:03 PM by stonecutter »
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Look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred-and-first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Jacob August Riis

Offline peteH

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Re: Another dryfit question
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2014, 08:17:19 PM »
This one will be in Salisbury CT.  Yes, you are correct, I would like to avoid the structural slab, what is #30 felt?  Also, what is a capillary break?  Thanks.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Another dryfit question
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2014, 08:54:16 PM »
30#.....heavy weight roofing felt.  Big box stores carry it...but if you're out in Salisbury go to Herrington inc out in Hillsdale, NY....not the Millerton store.  They have a good stone and masonry yard in Hillsdale, and there is everything you need for oven building....flues, fireclay or Heatstop 50, firebrick.  Not sure about perlite or vermiculite, but Agway might.  Or ask the guys in the masonry office, they are very helpful.


I lived in Goshen, CT...my friend and next door neighbor is a promenent memeber of the MHA, and well known masonry heater builder and an excellent soapstone fabricator. If you wanted any soapstone he sells slabs. I'll be up there sometime this late spring or summer...can't wait visit New England again.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2014, 10:22:40 AM by stonecutter »
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/

Look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred-and-first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Jacob August Riis

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Another dryfit question
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2014, 08:57:03 PM »
Whoops....capillary break.  A water proof membrane that stops moisture migration.

For that you can use a layer of 4 or 6 mil poly sheeting or EPDM ( rubber roofing )
http://oldworldstoneandgarden.com/

Look at a stone cutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred-and-first blow it will split in two, and I know it was not the last blow that did it, but all that had gone before.
Jacob August Riis


 

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