Author Topic: Miscellaneous Breads  (Read 2144 times)

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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #20 on: May 28, 2014, 12:40:42 AM »
Would you be so kind as to share the workflow recipe so I can attempt?


Dear Stefano, so far I have only scratched the surface in my attempts to make baguettes. I have a lot to learn. As far as I know, there are different ways of making baguettes. Some years ago, a Frenchman told me that baguettes generally fall into two broad categories: "classic baguettes" and "street baguettes". The proponents of the former treat baguettes formally/formulaically or according to certain conventions while the proponents of the latter treat baguettes with much less formalities or conventions, concentrating mainly on texture and flavor rather than being overly concerned with the right geometric configuration of the bread and et cetera.

Very, very briefly put, my workflow, if I do a straight dough and use fresh baker’s yeast, begins with a twenty-minute autolyse (flour and water only, no salt and yeast added at this point). My hydration is usually 70% or higher, depending on the type of flour and other factors.

After the autolyse, I add fresh baker’s yeast (thoroughly crushed and rubbed into a small amount of flour) and salt (non-hydrated) to the autolyzed dough and begin mixing. (In passing, I should mention that it is common to use poolish or levain in making baguettes, but here I am just doing a straight dough.) Next, I let the dough undergo fermentation 7-10 hours at room temperature. Then, I do the "pre-shaping" by cutting the dough into 180-200 gram portions. My wood-fired oven at home is very small, so I am not able to make full size baguettes, about 400 grams each. After a bench rest of 30-60 minutes at room temperature, I do the "final shaping" (a very critical stage of making baguettes), and let the baguette-shaped doughs rest on a dusted couche at room temperature for about 30-60 minutes. At last, I score the baguettes and bake them—with steam—for about 18 to 24 minutes at about 450 to 470 F on the oven floor.

Of course, there is lot more to making baguettes than the brief description above. Below are some videos that very briefly summarize the process. Being an amateur baguetteer, I do not know how good the videos are. Good luck!

<a href="http://youtu.be/masipMhrV5c" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/masipMhrV5c</a>

<a href="http://youtu.be/fCDaAvAHnkk" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/fCDaAvAHnkk</a>

<a href="http://youtu.be/cpqGHiPxuQU" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/cpqGHiPxuQU</a>

<a href="http://youtu.be/HuQ5K9eLfJ0" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/HuQ5K9eLfJ0</a>

<a href="http://youtu.be/RaMpIy6s_Aw" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/RaMpIy6s_Aw</a>

<a href="http://youtu.be/o8YQDc2w19M" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/o8YQDc2w19M</a>


In case you are interested in making ethnic flat breads, which are crusty and very much taste like baguettes, you may like to check out my thread at The Fresh Loaf:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/36357/persianiranian-barbari-bread

Good day!
« Last Edit: May 28, 2014, 02:18:59 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2014, 01:08:34 AM »
Here are some mini sourdough baguettes I baked yesterday. Unfortunately, they got over-baked by about 6 minutes. For flour, I used Giusto's "Artisan Bread Flour" (unbleached and malted) at about 72% hydration. Good day!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2014, 01:08:48 AM »
Here are some mini baker's yeast baguettes I baked yesterday. For flour, like above, I used Giusto's "Artisan Bread Flour" (unbleached and malted) at about 72% hydration. Good day!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #23 on: May 28, 2014, 03:01:21 AM »
Here is a great video on quality baguette v. mediocre baguette:

<a href="http://youtu.be/ntrp7i5CrfA" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://youtu.be/ntrp7i5CrfA</a>
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2014, 05:37:45 AM »
Here are some amateurish mini-baguettes I baked yesterday. For flour, I used white Khorasan flour (Kamut®), hydrated at 80%. Khorasan wheat (named after the Khorasan province in Iran, where the wheat is speculated to have originated from) is an ancient grain, which is said to be sweeter and nuttier (indeed!) in flavor than the modern wheat.

At 80% hydration, the dough (which was short-mixed, using no poolish or any other types of preferments) required only two stretch-&-folds throughout the initial warm fermentation, which took about 12 hours. Khorasan flour naturally has high protein content (reportedly higher than the modern wheat); hence, it can absorb a lot of hydration. Nonetheless, the generated gluten network is not as strong. It can be, in my experience, fragile. However, once the dough is acidified enough, because of the fermentative reactions, the dough becomes progressively easier to work with. Because of the weak gluten, it is difficult to achieve open crumb. Yet, the crumb is very soft, moist, and buttery. Below are some pictures. Good day!
« Last Edit: June 03, 2014, 05:41:11 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2014, 08:48:04 AM »
Are you heating your WFO with your propane torch or a fire to bake these beautiful loaves?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2014, 05:00:51 PM »
Are you heating your WFO with your propane torch or a fire to bake these beautiful loaves?

Dear Craig, thank you! Yes, I heat my WFO with the propane torch you kindly recommended. It is a great tool. Alternatively, sometimes I use the residual heat to bake baguettes if I happened to bake Neapolitan pizzas with wood-fire the day before. The latter usually works much better than the former.

I have a question. Do you know if it is safe to use steam injection (i.e., atomized/sprayed water) in a Neapolitan oven in order to bake breads? Good day!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2014, 05:18:45 PM »
Yesterday, I baked two batches of mini baguettes (180 grams each), using Giusto’s "Golden Haven" flour (unbleached, malted, 11.5% protein). The first batch was prepared with sourdough culture while the second batch was prepared with fresh baker’s yeast. Below are some pictures of the sourdough baguettes.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2014, 05:23:56 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2014, 05:19:12 PM »
Fresh yeast baguettes:
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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Offline deb415611

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2014, 08:24:12 PM »
beautiful breads Omid


Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2014, 06:38:14 PM »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #31 on: June 20, 2014, 05:29:18 PM »
Here are some mini baguettes (180 grams each) I baked in my WFO at home last Monday. In my experiments, I prepared 5 different batches of baguette doughs using Giusto’s "Golden Haven" flour (unbleached and malted, protein 11.5%). While each batch had about the same hydration (70%), the first one was prepared as a straight dough (no preferments), and the rest had varying percentages of poolish, i.e., 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of the formula flours at 100% hydration. The baguettes that I considered the best in terms of flavor, texture, and structure were from the first batch (see the first three pictures below), which were prepared as a straight dough, using fresh baker's yeast, without any preferments and using a total of fermentation time of about 12 hours at room temperature (75-81 F). Below are some pictures of the 1st, 2nd, and 5th batch.
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #32 on: June 20, 2014, 05:31:31 PM »
And, I ended the day with baking three tuna blankets, using the leftover baguette dough, stuffed with hard mozzarella, sliced fresh grape tomatoes, and tuna salad (white albacore, diced red onion, diced Persian pickles, a little mayonnaise, fresh lemon juice, salt, and red chili pepper flakes). Good day!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #33 on: June 20, 2014, 06:31:50 PM »
And, I ended the day with baking three tuna blankets, using the leftover baguette dough, stuffed with hard mozzarella, sliced fresh grape tomatoes, and tuna salad (white albacore, diced red onion, diced Persian pickles, a little mayonnaise, fresh lemon juice, salt, and red chili pepper flakes). Good day!

Oh my goodness. I will be trying this within the next week!
Pizza is not bread.

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #34 on: June 20, 2014, 06:42:32 PM »
Thanks for those photos Omid. The baguettes look really delicious.  My vegetarian month will be over July 13 and I think a "tuna blanket" is in my future. 

On another subject, may I ask where you buy the Giusto's Golden Haven flour? 

Thanks.

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #35 on: June 21, 2014, 07:09:55 AM »
Oh my goodness. I will be trying this within the next week!


Dear Craig, I learned about "Tuna blanket" (which is essentially some kind of calzone) when I worked at Sir Pizza in Key Biscayne, an island located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. That was about 27 years ago, that is 1987. Tuna blanket, which I initially did not care for, was one of the most popular items on the menu in those days. Per the pizzeria's website, the item is still on the menu.

http://www.sirpizzarestaurants.com/menu.php?m_id=2

Good day!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #36 on: June 21, 2014, 07:35:52 AM »
Thanks for those photos Omid. The baguettes look really delicious.  My vegetarian month will be over July 13 and I think a "tuna blanket" is in my future. 

On another subject, may I ask where you buy the Giusto's Golden Haven flour? 

Thanks.

Regards,

TinRoof


Dear Tinroof, thank you! I purchase Giusto's flours directly from the website for the company:

http://giustos.com/home_baker/flours/bread-flours/organic-golden-haven-unbleached-flour.html

Let me give you an idea as to how much the shipping and handling may cost. About two weeks ago, I ordered 3 bags of Golden Haven (5 pounds each) and 3 bags of Artisan Bread Flour (5 pounds each), and the shipping cost me $25.01. Have a great weekend!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #37 on: June 21, 2014, 11:48:57 AM »
Dear Craig, I learned about "Tuna blanket" (which is essentially some kind of calzone) when I worked at Sir Pizza in Key Biscayne, an island located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. That was about 27 years ago, that is 1987. Tuna blanket, which I initially did not care for, was one of the most popular items on the menu in those days. Per the pizzeria's website, the item is still on the menu.

http://www.sirpizzarestaurants.com/menu.php?m_id=2

Good day!


I will try it with blackfin tuna I caught and canned with fresh oregano and Calabrian chilies from my garden last summer. Thank you for sharing.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Totti

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #38 on: June 22, 2014, 08:46:39 AM »
Wonderful Omid. I want to begin to churn out some baguettes, but I just can't find a recipe online that seems to work well.

I'm beginning to think I should just use my pizza formulas.. Yours look truly art-worthy. If you would share your recipe, I would very much appreciate it!  :drool:


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #39 on: June 22, 2014, 03:05:33 PM »
I have a question. Do you know if it is safe to use steam injection (i.e., atomized/sprayed water) in a Neapolitan oven in order to bake breads? Good day!

I'm sorry. I missed the question and just saw it. No. I don't know for sure if it is safe, but I've done it with mine. I can't imagine it would matter. There is a lot of water vapor from the wood and baking pizzas in an operating NP oven. I don't think steam will absorb into the brick if they are significantly over the boiling point of water.
Pizza is not bread.


 

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