Author Topic: Miscellaneous Breads  (Read 2485 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pizza Napoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1350
  • Location: San Diego, CA
    • A Philosophy of Pizza Napoletanismo
Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #40 on: June 26, 2014, 06:28:22 PM »
I'm sorry. I missed the question and just saw it. No. I don't know for sure if it is safe, but I've done it with mine. I can't imagine it would matter. There is a lot of water vapor from the wood and baking pizzas in an operating NP oven. I don't think steam will absorb into the brick if they are significantly over the boiling point of water.

Dear Craig, thank you.
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/


Offline Pizza Napoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1350
  • Location: San Diego, CA
    • A Philosophy of Pizza Napoletanismo
Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #41 on: June 26, 2014, 06:28:33 PM »
Hi Omid,
Would you be so kind as to share the workflow recipe so I can attempt?

Dear Stefano, so far I have only scratched the surface in my attempts to make baguettes. I have a lot to learn. As far as I know, there are different ways of making baguettes. Some years ago, a Frenchman told me that baguettes generally fall into two broad categories: "classic baguettes" and "street baguettes". The proponents of the former treat baguettes formally/formulaically or according to certain conventions while the proponents of the latter treat baguettes with much less formalities or conventions, concentrating mainly on texture and flavor rather than being overly concerned with the right geometric configuration of the bread and et cetera.

Very, very briefly put, my workflow, if I do a straight dough and use fresh baker’s yeast, begins with a twenty-minute autolyse (flour and water only, no salt and yeast added at this point). My hydration is usually 70% or higher, depending on the type of flour and other factors.

After the autolyse, I add fresh baker’s yeast (thoroughly crushed and rubbed into a small amount of flour) and salt (non-hydrated) to the autolyzed dough and begin mixing. (In passing, I should mention that it is common to use poolish or levain in making baguettes, but here I am just doing a straight dough.) Next, I let the dough undergo fermentation 7-10 hours at room temperature. Then, I do the "pre-shaping" by cutting the dough into 180-200 gram portions. My wood-fired oven at home is very small, so I am not able to make full size baguettes, about 400 grams each. After a bench rest of 30-60 minutes at room temperature, I do the "final shaping" (a very critical stage of making baguettes), and let the baguette-shaped doughs rest on a dusted couche at room temperature for about 30-60 minutes. At last, I score the baguettes and bake them—with steam—for about 18 to 24 minutes at about 450 to 470 F on the oven floor.

Of course, there is lot more to making baguettes than the brief description above. Below are some videos that very briefly summarize the process. Being an amateur baguetteer, I do not know how good the videos are. Good luck!








In case you are interested in making ethnic flat breads, which are crusty and very much taste like baguettes, you may like to check out my thread at The Fresh Loaf:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/36357/persianiranian-barbari-bread

Good day!

I want to begin to churn out some baguettes, but I just can't find a recipe online that seems to work well.

I'm beginning to think I should just use my pizza formulas.. Yours look truly art-worthy. If you would share your recipe, I would very much appreciate it!  :drool:

Dear Totti, thank you! While I sympathize with your predicament re finding a baguette recipe, I, as an amateur baguetteer, am having a difficult time to communicate to you a baguette recipe because I do not know about your skill level and the circumstances under which you will implement the recipe. Philosophically speaking, a recipe is like a map, and as the great maxim has it, "The map is not the territory."

Moreover, as you can imagine, whatever recipe you employ to make baguettes, it needs to be responsive to a number of factors. For instance, a baguette recipe needs to take into account the physicochemical needs of the flour that you will use while keeping in mind the final physical and gustatory attributes of the baguettes that you desire to accomplish. I do not know what kinds of flours are available to you in New Zealand. Nonetheless, below is a straight dough recipe for making baguette dough, which needs to be adjusted to your particular circumstances. I recommend that you first experiment with straight dough before advancing toward making more complicated baguette dough with either poolish or levain.

Flour 100%
Water 70%
Salt 2%
Fresh Baker’s Yeast 0.1%

At last, please understand that my baguette-making knowledge is very limited, and I am still struggling with it. Have a great day!

Regards,
Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1350
  • Location: San Diego, CA
    • A Philosophy of Pizza Napoletanismo
Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #42 on: June 26, 2014, 06:45:01 PM »
Last Monday, I baked two batches of mini baguettes (about 180-185 grams each). The first batch was made with fresh baker's yeast while the second batch was made with sourdough culture. Each batch had about 70 to 72% hydration, using Giusto's Artisan Bread Flour (unbleached & malted, protein 11.5% +/- 0.5). Overall, the sourdough baguettes came out, in my opinion, way better than the baguettes fermented with fresh yeast. They had better structure and flavor. Below are some pictures of the baguettes made with fresh yeast. 
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1350
  • Location: San Diego, CA
    • A Philosophy of Pizza Napoletanismo
Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #43 on: June 26, 2014, 06:45:16 PM »
And, here are some pictures of the baguettes made with sourdough culture.
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Totti

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 154
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #44 on: June 27, 2014, 07:13:45 PM »
Thanks Omid! I decided to just experiment with my pizza workflow and did a 70% water, 3% salt and 40% ischia culture with Caputo flour. The taste was incredible and I was able to bake in 6 hours. They certainly aren't lookers but gee they were tasty. I didn't have any bakers couche so I had to just use my pizza boxers and some baking paper.

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12993
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #45 on: June 30, 2014, 04:43:43 PM »
And, I ended the day with baking three tuna blankets, using the leftover baguette dough, stuffed with hard mozzarella, sliced fresh grape tomatoes, and tuna salad (white albacore, diced red onion, diced Persian pickles, a little mayonnaise, fresh lemon juice, salt, and red chili pepper flakes). Good day!

I tried the tuna blankets. Simply incredible. I posted on them here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=32602.0

Thank you very much for sharing.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Pizza Napoletana

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1350
  • Location: San Diego, CA
    • A Philosophy of Pizza Napoletanismo
Re: Miscellaneous Breads
« Reply #46 on: July 15, 2014, 09:14:37 PM »
Thanks Omid! I decided to just experiment with my pizza workflow and did a 70% water, 3% salt and 40% ischia culture with Caputo flour. The taste was incredible and I was able to bake in 6 hours. They certainly aren't lookers but gee they were tasty. I didn't have any bakers couche so I had to just use my pizza boxers and some baking paper.

Dear Totti, thank you for sharing the picture of your baguettes. You made good efforts for a beginner. Baguettes are not easy to make; it takes a lot of perpetual practice and patience. Whenever I stop making baguettes for a month, I suffer the consequences.

Below are some more amateurish baguettes I made yesterday, along with some Iranian style "salade d'olive". Good day!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/


 

pizzapan