Author Topic: Who wants to talk about salt?  (Read 393 times)

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Offline mkevenson

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Who wants to talk about salt?
« on: May 16, 2014, 04:06:07 PM »
I have been reading some posts by Marco, from 2005. Interestingly it seems that in Italy, perhaps today but at least in past times, water was the ingredient that derived the amount of salt, yeast and flour. Unlike what we are used to, being flour.
At any rate, Marco was describing in one of those posts that for 1 litre of water it is common to use 45-55 grams of sea salt. This results in 4.5%- 5.5% salt, not % of flour however.
Since it seems the flour amount is based on texture of the dough and other factors including humidity and age of the flour, I wonder how   % of salt using bakers % would equate with the 4.5-5.5% of the water?
Any takers?
 
Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles


Offline mitchjg

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Re: Who wants to talk about salt?
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2014, 04:12:27 PM »
Let's say you have a 60% hydration dough.  Then, if the salt is 4.5- 5.5% of the water, it is

4.5% X 60% = 2.7%
to
5.5% X 60% = 3.3%

salt as a percentage of the flour, which is the baker's % approach.

- Mitch

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Who wants to talk about salt?
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2014, 04:46:06 PM »
Let's say you have a 60% hydration dough.  Then, if the salt is 4.5- 5.5% of the water, it is

4.5% X 60% = 2.7%
to
5.5% X 60% = 3.3%

salt as a percentage of the flour, which is the baker's % approach.

- Mitch

Mitch, if I had extended my thinking before I posted :o , as you have kindly pointed out, I would have had my answer.
On a side note, I find using the water as a basis of measurement, logical, especially when factoring in the humidity of the room one is making the dough in. Something I never think about! :-[

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Who wants to talk about salt?
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2014, 07:04:54 PM »
I believe the reason for using water as the basis is that it is the first thing to go into the mixer bowl.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Who wants to talk about salt?
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2014, 07:36:44 PM »
Starting with the water makes special sense when you are talking about the way dough is made in Naples and fermented at room temperature. Because everything is done at room temperature, a wide range of adjustments have to be made to adapt the dough to changes in the seasons so that the dough is ready for use at the same time every day when customers show up for pizza. These changes can involve the flour, the salt, and the leavening agent (commercial yeast or starter). But not the water. I discuss some of the adjustments in Reply 81 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=17779.msg176650;topicseen#msg176650 . When you see how much skill is required to make these changes, it is understandable why pizzaioli who have mastered the process are national treasures and held in such high esteem.

Peter

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Who wants to talk about salt?
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2014, 07:57:43 PM »
Starting with the water makes special sense when you are talking about the way dough is made in Naples and fermented at room temperature. Because everything is done at room temperature, a wide range of adjustments have to be made to adapt the dough to changes in the seasons so that the dough is ready for use at the same time every day when customers show up for pizza. These changes can involve the flour, the salt, and the leavening agent (commercial yeast or starter). But not the water. I discuss some of the adjustments in Reply 81 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=17779.msg176650;topicseen#msg176650 . When you see how much skill is required to make these changes, it is understandable why pizzaioli who have mastered the process are national treasures and held in such high esteem.

Peter

Amen!
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles