Author Topic: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation  (Read 690 times)

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Offline norma427

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Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« on: June 05, 2014, 08:58:43 AM »
I removed the Ischia starter from the fridge yesterday afternoon.  It had a gray liquid on the top and also a gray color in some of the flour and water.  I drained off the gray watery part and also removed most of the gray flour and water part.  I fed the Ischia starter two times yesterday. 

The photos show what the Ischia starter looked like yesterday and this morning before another feed.

The last time I did recall doing anything with the Ischia starter was at Reply 61 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=28766.msg303016#msg303016  Reply 498 
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26483.msg303158#msg303158 and using part Ischia starter and part IDY at Reply 170 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30641.msg310352#msg310352

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2014, 08:31:13 PM »
Photos of Ischia starter after two feedings today.  The Ischia starter culture looks active enough to be used.

Norma
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2014, 09:11:43 AM »
I removed the Ischia starter from the fridge yesterday afternoon.  It had a gray liquid on the top and also a gray color in some of the flour and water.  I drained off the gray watery part and also removed most of the gray flour and water part.  I fed the Ischia starter two times yesterday. 

I've always just stirred it back in, however I don't know if it makes a difference either way.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2014, 09:43:55 AM »
I've always just stirred it back in, however I don't know if it makes a difference either way.

Craig,

Thanks for telling me you always just stirred the gray part in.  How many feeding did it take until your Ischia starter was then active enough to be used?

Norma
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2014, 10:00:16 AM »
Last week, I fed my back-up Ischia. I always write the date of the prior feeding on the lid, and the last time I fed it was November 2013 - so at least 6 months ago. After I fed it, it sat on the counter not doing much for about 18 hours, then it quickly increased 2-3X over the next 6 or so hours. I fed it again, and it seemed like it was ready to go. I put it back in the fridge, so I can't say for sure, but I'd say two feedings would have been enough. It looked and smelled right.
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2014, 10:22:00 AM »
Last week, I fed my back-up Ischia. I always write the date of the prior feeding on the lid, and the last time I fed it was November 2013 - so at least 6 months ago. After I fed it, it sat on the counter not doing much for about 18 hours, then it quickly increased 2-3X over the next 6 or so hours. I fed it again, and it seemed like it was ready to go. I put it back in the fridge, so I can't say for sure, but I'd say two feedings would have been enough. It looked and smelled right.

Craig,

Thanks again for your reply.  That sure was a long while ago that you fed your back-up starter.  :o I think you are right that is important that the starter looks and smells right.  :chef:

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2014, 10:49:06 AM »
I fed the Ischia culture again last evening before going to bed.  The starter looked and smelled good this morning so I mixed enough dough for 2 doughs balls.  I used Craig's methods for making the dough.  The dough is now in the Styrofoam container with a frozen dough now.  The temperature in the Styrofoam box is 62.3 degrees F.  I would have made enough dough for more dough balls but want to see how these dough balls bake into pizzas with firebricks in the BS.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2014, 03:45:52 PM »
If anyone is interested, the bulk dough was divided, scaled and balled a little after 25 hrs. 

Norma 
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2014, 05:09:43 PM »
If anyone is interested in the bakes of these two dough balls in the Blackstone the photos start at Reply 637 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26483.msg318836#msg318836

The dough balls were a little bit overfermented.

Norma
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Offline Totti

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2014, 06:39:51 PM »
Norma that second pizza in your bake looked incredible, and cooked to perfection  :drool:


Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2014, 07:39:28 PM »
Norma that second pizza in your bake looked incredible, and cooked to perfection  :drool:

Totti,

Thanks!  I used the GM Neapolitan flour that was over a year old for that pizza.  Maybe the flour is going bad.  I had the flour in a 5 gallon plastic container with a lid but a flour over a year old might have not produced the best results.  The closest business to me that sells the Caputo Pizzeria flour is about an hour away from where I live.  I guess I had to take a road trip before I attempt a Neapolitan pizza again.  :-D

I wonder how I could tell if the GM Neapolitan flour was too old.  It smelled okay but I don't think that tells all.  I hate to waste flour but don't make that many Neapolitan pizzas.  I used this formulation but think I could have upped the hydration. 

I might as well post a couple photos of the pizza on this thread too.

Norma
« Last Edit: June 12, 2014, 07:42:37 PM by norma427 »
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Offline Totti

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2014, 04:17:05 AM »
Incredible Norma  :drool: :drool: :drool:

Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2014, 06:38:01 AM »
Incredible Norma  :drool: :drool: :drool:

Thanks Totti,

I removed the Ischia starter culture from the fridge yesterday morning and started feeding it again.  The Ischia smelled just like when I had placed it back into the fridge.  Two feedings and it is now back to almost normal.  I have to watch the weather, but think I will make some dough balls for Thursday for the open house at the brick place.  I still did not get any new OO flour and guess I won't find time to get any. 

Norma 
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2014, 08:30:50 PM »
This is the formulation and process so far for the dough balls that might be used tomorrow.  There is a 50/50 percent change of thunderstorms tomorrow.  I do not know what temperature the Chicago Oven will be run at.  I am not the person that will be maintaining the oven.  It will be another pizzeria owner from Mt. Joy.  He will be using the WFO at higher temperatures to bake his pizzas, but they will be his regular pizza doughs for NY style pizzas.  Since I could not make dough yesterday I had to mix the dough this morning.  I don't know what will happen with my dough.  I did not find time to purchase Caputo Pizzeria flour.  I will ball tonight.

Norma 
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2014, 08:32:42 PM »
Norma
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Offline fazzari

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2014, 10:16:19 PM »
Hey Norma
I noticed last week when I did the 24 hour room temp rise, I got all those black specks in my dough...   Did you get those too?  Your pizzas look amazing....I'm wondering how you like the texture of those in comparison to what you normally make?
John

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2014, 10:41:56 PM »
Hey Norma
I noticed last week when I did the 24 hour room temp rise, I got all those black specks in my dough...   Did you get those too?  Your pizzas look amazing....I'm wondering how you like the texture of those in comparison to what you normally make?
John


John,

No, I never saw those dark specks in any of my OO flour dough balls.  This type of dough balls are being kept at a somewhat constant temperature in the 60's.  I do like the texture and taste of Neapolitan pizzas very much.  I also like many other styles of pizzas, but I think my heart will always be with a NY style first.  :-D

What kind of flour were you using when you got those dark specks in the 24 hour room temperature rise? 

I am getting those dark specks in the dough balls since I am trying some 4-day cold ferments like at Reply 600 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30641.msg319927#msg319927  The dough balls when placed in plastic containers do get dark specks, but the ones in plastic bags don't get the dark specks.

Norma
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Offline fazzari

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2014, 04:14:53 PM »
John,

No, I never saw those dark specks in any of my OO flour dough balls.  This type of dough balls are being kept at a somewhat constant temperature in the 60's.  I do like the texture and taste of Neapolitan pizzas very much.  I also like many other styles of pizzas, but I think my heart will always be with a NY style first.  :-D

What kind of flour were you using when you got those dark specks in the 24 hour room temperature rise? 

I am getting those dark specks in the dough balls since I am trying some 4-day cold ferments like at Reply 600 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30641.msg319927#msg319927  The dough balls when placed in plastic containers do get dark specks, but the ones in plastic bags don't get the dark specks.

Norma

Using All Trumps flour....specks showed up after the 24 hour bulk fermentation, disappeared when I scaled and balled for refrigeration.  Interesting observation regarding plastic containers vs bags.  I have to keep that in mind as I observe....my bulk fermentation was in a plastic container.

Thanks Norma
John

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2014, 08:44:32 PM »

Using All Trumps flour....specks showed up after the 24 hour bulk fermentation, disappeared when I scaled and balled for refrigeration.  Interesting observation regarding plastic containers vs bags.  I have to keep that in mind as I observe....my bulk fermentation was in a plastic container.

Thanks Norma
John

John,

I don't think I ever tried a bulk fermentation for 24 hrs. at room temperature.  I didn't think dough would spot that fast but maybe it had something to do with the mass effect.  I sure don't know though.  I could understand how the dark spots then disappeared when you scaled and balled for refrigeration.  I would guess if any dough ball has spots on the top and then is reballed they might disappear too.  Did you ever notice that when reballing dough balls that were cold fermented for days?  Thanks for telling us what flour you used.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Taking Ischia starter out of hibernation
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2014, 08:51:09 PM »
I did not get to open any of the 4 Ischia starter doughs or bake them in the Chicago Oven.  I did have a great time talking to Sal and watching what he did.  First of all for anyone that does not know, Sal was the person that helped me first when I wanted to learn about making pizzas.  He was going to show me how to make pizza dough, but he became sick and needed an operation.  I then learned here on the forum how to make pizza dough after a long struggle. 

When I got to the brick place Sal was having problems with the wood they gave him and none of the wood would catch on fire and make flames.  It just burned and smoldered.  Sal was trying to work with that wood for 2 hours before I got there.  Sal said last year at the open house event the wood they gave him burned fine.  Sal kept his cool and tried to make pizzas out of his NY style doughs but the oven floor was not hot enough.  The dome of the oven was black too.  Sal said when the oven is working right the dome is white.  The top of the pies would bake but the bottom crusts were almost white.  Sal threw those pies away.  Sal told the one owner that the wood would not ignite and burn enough to get the oven floor hot.  The man said he would go to a local convenience store to pick up some wood.  Sal and I knew that would not be the best type of wood to use.  Sal had to take some of the smoldering wood/ashes out of the oven and could not find a bucket or shovel.  He used his metal pizza peel and a pizza pan to place the ashes on several times.  The new wood would ignite but it did not bring the oven up to a high enough temperature in an hour.  Sal move the burning wood and embers back and forth in the oven to try to get the floor hot enough.  That really didn't work out that well either and the oven never got to more than 717 degrees F.  The 717 degrees F temperature was near the end of the event.  Most of the time the floor measured in the middle 600's or lower in temperature.  Sal did make a lot of pizzas but was not satisfied with them.  The attendees at the open house event loved Sal's pizzas. 

Sal said he would try my dough balls near the end of the open house event.  I had watched how Sal had opened his dough balls and knew the Neapolitan dough balls should not be opened the same way.  Sal said the Neapolitan dough balls opened easily but already I knew they might not have a lot of oven spring in the oven or bake well.  They didn't bake well or have oven spring.  The Ischia dough balls did look like they had fermented enough.  Sal had a regular bigger metal pizza peel to dress the pizzas on, slide them into the oven and retrieve them.   

It was a lot of fun talking to Sal again this afternoon and evening.  8) I learned a lot from him and it brought back a lot of memories about when I didn't know anything about making pizzas.  I never saw Sal open dough balls or dress pizzas, so that was fun to watch too. 

Guess I will be trying some more Ischia dough balls in the BS. 

Norma 
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