Author Topic: OO Caputo recipe - 550 convection oven on Pizza Stone - feedback appreciated.  (Read 296 times)

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Offline jvp123

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Tried my first 100% 00 Caputo recipe with a 61 percent hydration four day cold rise and 3 hour rest on counter at room temp before hand shaping my pizzas.  FYI - The dough had doubled in size under the cold rise.

I previously had used a half 00/half all purpose recipe with good results but looking to try 100% Caputo as it seems to get favorable reviews.

I was surprised that the dough stayed relatively flat after a 7 minute cooking time on 540 degree pizza stone.  It just didn't get the poofy quality I was expecting.  and was almost a bit "cracker"-like to be honest.  Still tasty but not my best. 

I just ordered a baking steel to see if that helps and if its a temperature issue.

Any feedback to help me improve my results would be appreciated. 

Thanks!  (tried to attach some pics)






Offline jsaras

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Ditch the Caputo.  It's meant to be used in ovens that operate at 800+ degrees.  Caputo has recently started making a flour called "Metro" that is made to be used with ovens that operate under 700 degrees.  I don't think that anyone here has used it as of yet.

In any event, your oven setup is not going to produce a Neapolitan pizza with or without steel.  It may be advisable to move on to another style of pizza that's more compatible with your oven. 
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Offline TXCraig1

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How much did your dough balls weigh? What is the diameter of the pies? Was all the rise time in balls?

7 minutes @ 540F is probably going to be crispy no matter what flour you use.
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Offline jvp123

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Yeah I'm thinking of trying KAF bread flour.  But I thought the baking steel was supposed to get the temp to 700 degrees or so which might make the caputo work?  Otherwise I'll just try the KAF on the steel too. I want to go higher heat so I'm hoping the steel will help.  Not ready to go all the way to a wood fire oven yet so the steel will be a baby step.
TX Craig1 - my balls were 250 grams each with about 12" pies.  Tried to hand shape them so as not to compress the dough and create more air pockets.

Offline Tscarborough

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The Caputo can be made work in a blend, but you need to get some large but shallow doughball containers.

Offline jvp123

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oh Tscarborough could you please expand on why i need large but shallow containers? 
Did you mean like a refrigerator sized proofing tray?


and do i need to separate my dough balls at the time of mixing?  or can i leave it together until the day i make the pizzas?

Offline TXCraig1

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Yeah I'm thinking of trying KAF bread flour.  But I thought the baking steel was supposed to get the temp to 700 degrees or so which might make the caputo work?  Otherwise I'll just try the KAF on the steel too. I want to go higher heat so I'm hoping the steel will help.  Not ready to go all the way to a wood fire oven yet so the steel will be a baby step.
TX Craig1 - my balls were 250 grams each with about 12" pies.  Tried to hand shape them so as not to compress the dough and create more air pockets.

If you want a more Neapolitan-like pie, I'd go with KAAP over KABF. The steel should help your oven spring. Tom's right about the wide, shallow container. starting from a larger disk will allow you to retain more (damage less) of the internal structure that makes oven spring possible.
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Offline jvp123

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Ok I'll get a wide shallow container thanks so much.  I assume you mean like a proofing tray?  or a wide shallow tupperware to put my dough balls in individually in the fridge while it develops?

Regarding King Arthur all purpose vs bread flour.  Doesn't the bread flour have more protein which is more gluten which is better for pizza?

Offline TXCraig1

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Ok I'll get a wide shallow container thanks so much.  I assume you mean like a proofing tray?  or a wide shallow tupperware to put my dough balls in individually in the fridge while it develops?

Regarding King Arthur all purpose vs bread flour.  Doesn't the bread flour have more protein which is more gluten which is better for pizza?

No - not a proofing tray. Just something like the reusable Rubbermaid containers they sell by the zip-lock bags in the grocery store. Look for one that is about 7" on top and 6" on the bottom.

Bread flour typically does have more protein (though KAAP is not low at about 11.7% if I remember correctly), but I for one do not subscribe to the more protein is better for pizza philosophy. The best pizza is made with the right flour for the job - not the one with the most protein. Do you want a tough pizza with a firm bite or something more tender? Given that you posted in the NP section and commented on the first attempt being crispy, I'm guessing the latter?
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Offline jvp123

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Thanks so very much!  This is so extremely helpful.  What a great forum!

I am posting here because originally i was looking to use the simple ingredients of a Neapolitan pizza.  The basic four for the dough and in terms of sauce and cheese i wanted simple too.  San Marzano tomatoes uncooked and buffalo mozz and basil.  In terms of crust I am looking for something which is charred but has a bit of that "chewy" quality.  Perhaps that isn't "neapolitan" so perhaps I am doing a blend of both NY and Neapolitan.  Is that Neo - Neapolitan?
Anyway - i definitely don't like dough that taste like dense bread and don't like it too thin and cracker-like either.  A bit chewy and tender on the inside (with air pockets) and charred bubbles and crust on the outside is how I'd describe it.


Offline TXCraig1

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I think you'll see a big improvement with AP on steel - particularly if you can get your bake time down a couple minutes. You can always use a propane torch to get some browning on top if top color is the only reason you need to leave it in the oven longer. Doing this and using steel, maybe you can get your time near 3 min. That should be a reasonably tender and puffy pie.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline jvp123

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oh the torch idea is brilliant for a final touch!  ;D


 

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