Author Topic: Got Bubbles?  (Read 645 times)

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Offline DNA Dan

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Got Bubbles?
« on: June 30, 2014, 09:21:42 PM »
Tonight's pie using a different approach than I normally use.


Offline fazzari

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Re: Got Bubbles?
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2014, 01:03:56 AM »
That's a beauty Dan!!!!!!

john

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Got Bubbles?
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2014, 01:08:59 PM »
Thanks John!  Too bad this is the exception and not the rule. Now I need to re-analyze some of the variables involved..... BTW, this was made with All Trumps.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Got Bubbles?
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2014, 08:42:17 PM »
How do you consider this the exception and not the rule? I haven't looked at your Malty Laminated thread in a while, but I'm sure there are at least several pizzas that look about like that. A couple of them have even been posted by others on the Tommy's thread to show the similarity(ies) of a couple pizzas I made that looked a lot like that (last summer).

If I'm wrong, tell me why I'm wrong.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Got Bubbles?
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2014, 11:36:32 PM »
Photos don't convey taste, texture and mouthfeel. I'm sure you've made a few that looked good but tasted just, okay. Then you might have a few that looked just okay and tasted great. There's several areas where I grade my pizza tasting experience and this one was about a 9 for me. If I had made it a little thicker, it probably would have been my best pie yet. I like to have a decent gummy layer in there and this one was lacking in that department.

As you get better at making pizzas (and more experience eating the same style over and over  :P) the vague criteria that once defined a "success" becomes more elaborate. You start to see more subtle details in each area. For example, someone just starting out with this style is probably hoping for "a crispy bottom layer".  After making, cooking and eating about 100 or so of these in various experiments over the past decade, I now have about 5 different "types" of crispy bottom layer that register in my brain. Each one unique, each one distinct.

Finally the pizzas I have posted are usually the better pies I have made anyway. Certainly not ALL the pizzas I have made end up here.  :angel:

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Got Bubbles?
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2014, 11:35:23 AM »
Awesome as usual Dan.

I was recently in Orange County, CA on vacation and had dinner on a Sunday night with my family at a Round Table Pizza.  I noticed on this particular visit the pizza does not seem as tasty and robust as I remember.  The bubbles were there, but not as much as I remember.  The taste was also not as good (maybe from using that new no-fat dough recipe that Californians are subjected to).  Your pizza looks spectacular!   :drool:

I am looking forward to your further experiments and results.  One question: what was the amount of heat used in baking the pizza?  I find that makes a huge difference in the amount of bubbling I get when I make cracker/low hydration pizzas.

Keep up the good work  :)

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Got Bubbles?
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2014, 09:10:16 PM »
Thanks ME. Kinda sucks hoping for a 1980s or 1990s RT experience when in the back of your mind you just know it isn't going to be like it once was huh? Everytime I am near one I give it a shot, only to be disappointed every time. I can't even remember the last good RT experience I had. It's like those times are gone, lost up somewhere in pizza heaven. . .

Cooking - I concur with your comments about temperature. This was cooked on a 3/4" stone @ ~500 degrees. I'll take it a step further and add that I have found the amount of heat TRANSFER is critical too. When I had the conveyor, I used the anodized discs and the heating elements in the oven heated those up pretty fast. If I take the same approach and put the disc on my stone, the pizza isn't nearly as good. So for the fat stone I am using, I use the baking paper method. If I could launch directly on the stone, I think that would be better, but I haven't perfected my cornmeal dusted pizza peel technique enough. I also like to use an aluminum peel and it seems more difficult to launch compared to a wooden peel. Anyway, I go about 5 minutes, pull the paper so it's directly on the stone, rotate 180 degrees and give it another 5-7 minutes depending how heavy the toppings are. My oven has a convection fan that I turn on for the full duration of baking. When I go to rotate it halfway, the side towards the fan always shows more bubbling. I assume this is because it's being blasted with more direct hot air. I think an ideal oven would be an impinger or stone deck. I think from here I would like to try baking on a piece of steel.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Got Bubbles?
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2014, 04:36:56 PM »
So for the fat stone I am using, I use the baking paper method. If I could launch directly on the stone, I think that would be better, but I haven't perfected my cornmeal dusted pizza peel technique enough.
 I think from here I would like to try baking on a piece of steel.

Try semolina flour instead of corn meal on a wooden peel.  Use a metal peel to slide the pizza from the wooden peel to the stone in the oven.  See if that works.  Depending on the hydration, you will need very little or quite a bit of semolina flour.

I would like to try the baking steel method sometime, too, and if you do give it a try, let us know how it turns out.

Thanks again for posting,

-ME
Let them eat pizza.